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1

There's an easy way to do this for a limited set of cases. If your destination is a popular tourist area, go down to a bricks and mortar travel agent and get a brochure for holidays in the area. Most of those have a table of prices for the same vacation on different weeks or months. From that you can tell which are the cheap months. If you don't want to do ...


2

You'll have difficulties to find such a site. Still, a bit of logic will allow you to predict which dates are the best and then you'll just need to verify that your assumptions are right. Here are the factors influencing the hotel rates/level of frequentation: - school holidays - major convention or event in the city - bank holidays next to a week end - ...


1

It's cultural, in Mexico even locals have to do it with some services or in some markets but when they see a tourist they try to sell everything for more... this because they know tourist have money to spend and they will try to get more money but this only happens with non-established businesses.


3

This is a huge topic - good negotiation technique is both an art form and the applied science of psychology. I am by no means an expert, but here are some tips that have worked for me: Look for the same goods in "official", "no-negotiation" stores (for example, in souvenir shops in expensive hotels or airports, anywhere where the price is clearly posted). ...


3

The VRS Pocket Guide (PDF) has all the info you need in a very accessible format. I've copied the fare segment here: The weekly ticket (which always starts on Monday!) can be very cost effective if your travel matches it. To figure out which type of ticket you need (1-7) you can input your trip in this journey planner: ...


1

you can get day-passes (called "TagesTicket") if you know you need to take the trains regulary on that day. They cost 8.50 for 1 person or 12.90 for 5 persons in the area of cologne, for the other variants check out their site (https://www.vrsinfo.de/tickets/preisliste.html)


1

My advice is to avoid street food. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3209856/ A study in Santa Fe de Bogota, Colombia revealed that over 30% of a group of food handlers examined were carriers of pathogenic microorganism including Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enteritidis, and Shigella The report details a number of ...


4

Disclaimer: I've not been to Colombia yet, but I have it on good authority that this is one of the most typically Colombian street foods, and I've tried it from Colombian places in other countries and it's pretty distinctive. Arepas They're a kind of stodgy corn (maize) bread, often served with cheese. Surprisingly filling, good for breakfast or after ...


2

I don't think you will find something as universal as Trivago, Skyscanner, Kayak for campsites but your friendly neighborhood Google can yield some results that will let you book at least some of the sites online: Reserve America HipCamp Recreation.gov - For US National Park Service sites. There is probably more but you should be able to find them on ...


6

Uber.com provides an official Fare Estimator now, which gives out a range for all types of transport.


5

I use a combination of packing cubes, amenity kits I get for free from airlines, and cheap little zippered bags that get sold as pencil cases, makeup kits etc (the dollar store has lots of sizes.) I deliberately get a wide variety of colours (so they're easy to tell apart) and sizes (because sometimes you need a lot of room and sometimes you don't.) I give ...


4

As EdmundYeung99 mentions, packing cubes, I use different kinds for different purposes: ebags cubes are all-flexible but come in really small sizes as well (small slim is just 6.5" x 5" x 2.75"), Samsonite cubes are a little bit better keeping their shape but it's still just a packing cube (these come in a set of three). Cables and small electronics go in ...


4

Enter at 42nd and 8th. It's the big building with the taxis and sketchy characters standing outside (or if arriving by subway, enter through the direct subway entrance). Go downstairs to gates ~60-90ish. There are signs labeling it, but I don't recall the exact range listed. After descending the stairs to the correct level, the bus to DC will be somewhere ...


3

You can find your gate by asking someone from the Greyhound ticket booth or you can use the new touch screen that tells you your gate by searching for your travel id located somewhere on your ticket.


9

Your Greyhound will certainly leave from Port Authority in New York, some tickets don't have the door or gate number printed on them, but everything is available at the station. I've done this myself on a few occasions, it's a big station and they've organized it a little like an airport in the sense where they have some panels up with the next departures ...


8

I was walking around Narita Airport (Tokyo) today during a transit, and saw these signs outside toilets that immediately reminded me of this question. It appeared that all the toilets in Terminal 2 ( where I was) had the facilities. Feeling curious, I also took a photo of what I presumed to be these facilities in the disabled toilet. Therefore, another ...


0

Place your backpack in a large lightweight waterproof duffel-like bag, of the kind you'd use to avoid problems with straps getting caught in conveyor belts when checking in large rucksacks. I remember seeing Dutch backpackers use this method, and they had a lightweight cover/bag designed specifically to contain and protect their packs.


2

I regularly travelled with liquid and semi liquid products and the best way to avoid a big problem is to put it in a jar (even glass should be ok) with a threaded cap. Then protect it in a box specifically designed for jars. You have a lot of examples there : Sample protection box for jars


5

Use a rain cover. They are basically nylon or alike fabric sheets, with a bit of sewing on the corners and have elastic sewn on the outer edge, which will tighten it around your pack. Covers are available in a wide range of sizes and it does not matter if the fit is not really close, as long as the bag is covered and the elastic can reach the back. It does ...


3

Although camping in Byron Bay and surrounding suburban areas is not permitted, if you head north of Byron Bay along the Pacific highway there are numerous free parking spots. One of them is the Yelgun rest area. There is also one about 5 minutes north of the Byron turn off. If you go further north, you can also find the Sleepy Hollow rest area even further ...


5

Simple: use a third-party site like Uber Estimate. Obviously any results you'll get from here will be unofficial and not guaranteed, but they seem to be pulling data directly from the app. Note that even in the Uber app itself, you don't have precise control over what you'll get: for most cities, your choices are basically "normal cars driven by random ...



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