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12

In the US hotels I stay in, room service dining typically includes a service charge and delivery charge with wording such as: All Room Service Orders are Subject to State and Local Taxes, a Delivery Charge of $3.50, and a Service Charge of 22%. The Service Charge Includes Gratuity. Being the USA, there will normally be an extra space for yet ...


12

Typically in-room dining is charged to the room. The person who delivers it will hand you a slip of paper to sign. There will be room on this slip to add a tip. You don't know if that tip will go entirely to the person delivering your food, or be pooled with other people in the same department, but tipping that way is the norm. If you prefer, you could ...


8

Although I'd never presume to tell people what they should do, it would be quite common to tip for delivered housekeeping items such as a toothbrush, toothpaste, extra soap, extra pillow or whatever. The only thing I'm ever likely to ask for is a toothbrush and/or toothpaste if I've forgotten mine, and I often don't have local currency on me. So, sometimes I ...


5

Using your cited vend-o-matic "restaurant", I would hazard a guess that the card swipe / authorization process is simply sale and does not offer a tipping option. Encouraging folks to "tip" a vending machine would likely not be viewed favorably by the buying public. Taking the automated restaurant further, to where robots are taking your order tableside, ...


10

In the US, tipping is usual (and expected) in so called full service restaurants; meaning you sit down directly and order at a table with the server. No tips are usual (but of course allowed and liked) in half-service restaurants, those are restaurants where you order yourself at a central desk, sit down, and your food is brought to your table by the server....


12

No, robots wouldn't even know what a tip was, and you'd not tip at McDonald's even staffed by humans.



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