Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

The best way to leave a tip is in cash and prominently with a note. It's best to tip once at the end of the stay. It makes it more convenient for you, and for them. Don't worry about not getting the right person - it all averages out, and tips are frequently pooled anyway. Don't worry about the language issue. Most domestics know enough English to ...


0

Simple: tip daily, if you can. If you tip daily, your tips will definitely go to all the people who clean your room. If you tip at the end of your stay, your tip may or may not go to all the people who clean your room. Also, by frontloading your tips, you build up goodwill with the staff, and housekeeping will be happy to do you a favor if you need it. ...


5

Tim Urban's wonderfully thorough piece Everything You Don't Know About Tipping explains what tipping in the US is about. Unless a server was actively hostile, rude and offensive to you, it's not right to deprive them of their income. That's just how it works in the US. Furthermore, as is mentioned, if they get good tips, servers see it as a reflection of ...


4

In general in the US, the 15% guideline only applies if you're getting some service associated with your food/beverage - service in a sit-down restaurant, food delivered, etc. If I'm getting coffee to go and paying cash, I'll usually throw some of the coins I get in change into the tip jar, but that's as much because I don't like carrying coins as anything ...


1

Just for additional information and warning: A lot of restaurants in New England and along the Canadian border will add an automatic 18% gratuity to your bill. This means they've decided how much you're going to tip and put it on your bill. They will always tell you that they're adding it, or forewarn you that it will be added... but only ever in small ...


4

The quality of the food is irrelevant to the tip. The cook gets payed a full wage and does not receive any of the tip. Therefore your only concern when deciding how much to tip should be on the service provided by the waiter or waitress. DO NOT reward the service staff for the work of the kitchen. Personally, if I get bad service then I tip about half of ...


3

While in the US, you should definitely tip. This should only be based on the service; you're tipping your waiter/waitress, NOT the cook. I generally use 20% as my starting point, if I don't feel that they did a good job I'll drop down to 15% (or further if need be). Likewise, I'll go up to 30% if I feel like the server really earned it. In almost all cases, ...


4

If the tip is not included in the bill, I will do what you indicated... make a rough guess add the rough guess to the bill top up the new total to the next highest integer put that figure in the total and sign the receipt (or credit card) This same technique works for me in the USA, the UK, France, Italy, Germany... basically all of the EEA, and Russia, ...


1

In all but the most exceptional circumstances try to tip between 10-20% (even 10 is a bit low) however certain scenarios would definitely lean towards not following this standard, keep reading for my own personal example. I went to a Chili's restaurant for dinner, it wasn't busy at all and we were seated immediately. Our server took our order and then we ...


5

I've worked in a bunch of restaurants (many years ago) as both a waitress and a bartender. In both instances I've placed takeout orders for customers either in the restaurant or calling in to pick up. At the time I was making below the standard minimum wage because it's assumed by the government that I'll make it up in tips. That was not always the case. ...


1

A feedback to the managerial staff of how the waiter/waitress served you will do it I believe. However it the food is great surely leaving a tip is something that can be consider, since in the kitchen there are some dedicating cook that are making everything they can to put a smile on your face when you're leaving the restaurant.


4

In the US, it is generally advised you do not tip for takeout; however, this does not prohibit you from tipping the cashier anyways (which I do). There's no concrete answer for this. Remember, tipping is a way to show that you appreciate the service wrought upon you; people don't tip if the service is bad or horrible, or tip less. For myself, if I have to ...


6

I've never received such poor service that the waitperson did not deserve a tip for their time. Most cases where the server did the worst job, they were obviously in, or just out of, training and still slightly overwhelmed. I typically use 15% as a starting point. If it was on the extreme end of bad, I'll play fast and loose, maybe round to the nearest $1 ...


10

In many locations, tips are not only for the waitstaff, but are actually shared with the busboys, the bartender, and sometimes other members of the staff - usually not the cooks, but even occasionally then. They're also a significant fraction of their wages, most waiters earning a few dollars an hour "plus tips" rather than a full, normal wage. When I ...


11

The people at the takeout counter probably aren't dependent largely on tips as their primary wage (as waitstaff in the US are), but if your order is complicated, it is courteous to tip. And, I'd recommend being consistent with a dollar or two if this is a neighborhood restaurant you order from frequently — they'll remember. The blog "Wait But Why" has a ...


27

cdkMoose is correct in that the quality of the food should not influence your tip. However, your question appears to operate on a bit of a false premise, and I think it should also be said that leaving a small tip for poor service should be done only in exceptional circumstances. By exceptional circumstances, I mean active hostilty or extreme rudeness on ...


56

Tipping is for the service, the menu price is for the food. If the service is bad, leave a small tip. This will show the wait person that you didn't forget to tip, but felt that their service was undeserving. On the converse, it is important not to leave a poor tip if the food was bad but the service was good. The wait staff can not make the food ...


16

I like to tip them the smallest value coin I have; that way they knew I didn't forget a tip. Then I talk to the manager or email feedback.


12

Generally the worker at the cashier will take tips if given, but they aren't required. Usually the "tip jar" in those circumstances serves as a "put that pocket change you didn't actually want here," like if you're paying cash or the like. Just because there is a jar of some sort next to the cash register doesn't mean they take tips, either; Some ...


16

No, I wouldn't. A tip is for good service (someone bringing food drink to your table, keeping on top of your requests etc.) but with takeout you're buying a product. Its similar to going to McDonalds or Wendy's. Generally, its waiters and waitresses that get tips as they make a lower Federal minimum wage than the other staff. While some states have laws ...


32

No. You don't tip unless it's a delivery charge. For example, if you order takeout food and have them deliver (especially common in hotels), then you'd want to tip the driver. From Wikipedia: Tips are also generally given for services provided in golf courses, casino, hotels, concierge, food delivery, taxis, spa and salons. If you're going to the ...


0

Tipping is not expected in Vietnam, but will be greatly appreciated. Smart hotels and restaurants nowadays add a 5% -10% service charge (which should be indicated on the bill) but elsewhere it’s up to you. In most cases, a few thousand dong will be an adequate tip. It is customary, though not compulsory, to tip tour guides and drivers at the end of a tour. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included