Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

53

As a flight attendant for years, NO, no one tips flight attendants. Flight attendants are usually paid very well, and in some cases, very very well. They are usually paid per hour in addition to a basic salary and many bonuses for having layovers out of town and other stuff. Tipping them would be considered offensive and an insult in most airlines anyway. ...


32

There's a bit of per-country variation, but the rule of thumb across Western Europe is that service charges are already included in the bill (sometimes as a separate line item, sometimes not) and it's not necessary to tip in addition to this. If you must, and you usually wouldn't unless the service is really good, rounding up a euro or two to the nearest ...


29

In the Netherlands (I live there...), most people tip by just leaving some cash on the table or by rounding up the amount on the bill or credit card slip. Amounts tend to not be steep either, there's no such thing as the "expected 15% tipping" in the US. Literally rounding up the bill to a nice round number is common. Say your bill is for 46 Euro, make it ...


27

Scandinavia (where I'm from): matches the UK as described by Rory here. If the service is really good, you can tip upwards of 5-10% if you want. But please note that most entry-level jobs like cashiers, waiters, cabdriver etc. pays a lot better in Scandinavia than in the US (or frankly, most other countries), so you're not stealing anyone's lunch by not ...


26

Tipping in the US is much more common than elsewhere. In much of the US service staff are deliberately paid very low wages and expected to make it up in tips. Remember this when comparing prices in North America and Europe - the price of a restaurant may look low, but you are going to have to pay up to 30% extra on it - 15% tax and 15% tip. I can't do ...


22

I believe you are mixing two pieces of advice. The best currencies are Euros, Canadian Dollars... This is because of the trade embargo against Cuba from the USA. This means US dollars are very expensive to exchange in Cuba, so other currencies should be used. Euros are often said to get the best exchange rate. This is not saying that vendors, hotels or ...


18

Not sure if this is quite the scenario you are outlining, but: If you're really really broke, chances are you won't be eating at restaurants or places that require tipping in the first place :) At least in the US, tipping is not the norm (or is completely optional - eg. tip jar might be present) at fast food (McD, Chipotle), sandwich shops (Subway) or other ...


18

You've just seen a reason why to avoid tourist trap restaurants in the centre of Prague. Just today there is an article published in Czech newspapers about these service charges in the centre of Prague. They write that English speaking inspectors got these additional charges 5-15 % in many restaurants they checked. That never happened when they spoke Czech. ...


17

While it's occasionally being seen a bit more, tipping is NOT expected in Australia. Wages are expected to cover the employees, and everything is included in your bill. Indeed, in some places, tipping is forbidden - for example you might not be able to tip a security guard or dealer in a casino. It's occasionally common to tell taxi drivers or waiters ...


16

Officially, you are not supposed to / expected to give tips to anyone on the Indian Railways network. On most express or mail trains, these attendants used to be IRCTC employees, a public sector company but many of them are now being directly handled by the Indian Railways while on other routes, these are handled by private companies. Regardless of who ...


16

In the UK you would definitely be expected to tip in a restaurant if the service is good, and the tip should be around 10% of the cost of your meal. Most reasonable sized places give you the option on the credit card reader, but cash also works.


16

I'm in Istanbul right now, and when I got here I asked a friend who has been here before. According to her, no, it's not required, but is always welcome. I have not got any noticeable negative reactions over the past week from not tipping, and very gracious thanks when I have done so, but I'm still new to the country and may have trouble 'reading' people ...


16

For the US in general, 15% is the commonly expected bottom line, not 10, unless you're trying to send a mean spirited message to your server. 20% is far from unheard of. In NYC in particular, 17% is probably the most common number - this is because NY Sales Tax on your restaurant bill is 8.5%, and most people just double the tax to calculate their tip - ...


16

The classical way to go about this is to leave cash on the table. Your receipt will usually come in either a receipt-wallet (left), or a small plate of some kind (right): After you pay for the meal, drop the tip in there. Usually this means that the waiter who attended you will collect the tip, before clearing the table for the next customers. You can ...


16

In continental Europe, use cash, nothing else. That's a simple rule you should follow, all other discussions are a distraction. There are some differences between countries but generally speaking tipping on the credit card is highly unusual, in most countries you won't find any routine way to add a tip on the bill and many people will not know what to do if ...


15

In my opinion Airbnb is nothing but a short-let provider. Yes people do rent out their spare rooms, and thus welcome you in their house. But they do so in exchange for money, very much like a hotel, or a bed-and-breakfast, would do. In that sense I don't think tipping is necessary. If you want to show appreciation to an excellent host, the best way to do ...


13

In whole Germany (quite similiar in Austria and Suisse / Switzerland) it's quite usual to tip. As waiters are payed (salary or by hour) the tip doesn't have to be high, typically below 2 or 1.50 Euro (example: 16.80 Euro --> 18) - by every person (!). Of course it depends on the price category... Only if you're really disappointed you would let give back ...


13

In Europe there aren't really any rules that govern tipping as a whole. Simply reading the various answers might already have given you a good indication; the rules differ per country, and within the countries they often differ per establishment as well. As the rules differ so widely, it may be more useful to use some common sense, and try to figure it ...


13

As a rule, tipping is not necessary in Australia, wages are sufficient to make a living anyway and this shows in the eye-watering prices for any service. Most cafes and casual restaurants have tip jars, where you're welcome to reward good service with a coin or two (or, like us when eating out with our two-year-old, apologize for mess), but this is purely ...


12

Is the rule the same for all occasions to tip, or are there different amounts depending for a table service restaurant, the tip jar of a fast-food restaurant, a bar waiter, a taxi driver? Rules are not the same. In a restaurant it is considered typical to tip ~15% for an average service. If the service is good, go for double sale tax (in CA/NY ...


12

I usually round up to the next 5 dollar increment, with a minimum of 15%. If paying by credit card, I'll usually just use the automatic 20% button (the smallest offered), out of laziness. This WSJ Article claims that the average in NYC is 18-19%. Which is above the national average by a little, but not much. That's a pretty decent number to target, but I'll ...


12

I am not aware of any "common" rule around here except that tip is almost always given by rounding the price up to next multiple of 5 or 10 CZK. Which makes the usual amount depend on the price quite a lot, considering that normal pub where commoners go to lunch the lunch costs around 100 CZK. Tip is not mandatory. It is quite common, but usually not that ...


11

Here's a pretty good compile list of different countries. It obviously doesn't have every country but it should get you started... http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/travelbuzz/738653-foreign-tipping-guide-country-region.html


11

but [tipping] is meant to be for a good job Yes, in theory, but in practice it's standard to (almost) always leave a tip. Even if the service is merely "bad", then you generally leave a tip on the low end of the scale. If it really is appalling (ie, they got your order completely wrong, or were excessively slow for no good reason), then you leave a ...


11

Well, I think it is true :-) Not every time but it depends on the waiter. It happened to me also and I am Polish. So just in case, hold the 'thank you' for a while ;-)


11

In general if there is a "Service Fee", then this is the same thing as a tip. This is not the same as a "Room Service Fee", which is NOT the same as a tip. Generally a "service fee" will be a percentage of the total, normally around 15-20%, whereas the "Room Service Fee" (sometimes referred to as a plate fee, a tray fee, delivery fee or something similar) ...


11

In the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany its very common to tell the waiter, make it (Price+ Price * 5-10%) euro. Then they will simply input this in there credit card reader, and it get's sorted at the end of the day. (Your tip is divided along all staff working during your visit.) Source: I live in The Netherlands close to the Belgium and German border, ...


10

There are different ideologies when it comes to tipping. As a former waiter in the US myself, I tend to tip very generously. This is how I do it. YMMV. I calculate a 15% tip, based on the price of the meal (before any discounts are applied). If the service was very good/friendly, I increase, up to 25%. I only ever exceed 25% in very rare/exceptional ...


10

There is generally no cultural expectation of tipping in Australia. Restaurant staff do not rely on tips to supplement their wage (their minimum wage is the same as everybody else). This is one reason why the food seems so expensive.


10

In Sweden - when paying with credit card - you almost always get the option of specifying the total amount you want to pay. Many people don't use cash at all any more so it is the only way for the restaurant staff to get a tip. (I guess it then depends on the restaurant if and how it is distributed among the staff.) This seems to differ from most of ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible