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3

Adding a new answer since this needs an update: there's now a new choice in town, namely the Opal card. At time of writing (Oct 2014), it can be used on all trains and ferries plus most buses, but not the light rail; by sometime in mid-2015, it should cover the lot. Opal is your standard pay-per-use 'smartcard', just tap on and tap off every time you get ...


2

The Immigration Advice & Rights Centre has a pdf document on Visitor Visas, including the 651. Essentially, you have to be able to prove to the immigration officer that you have the intent to return home. ONE of the means of doing so includes having a purchased return ticket, showing that you're leaving the country on day x. Most countries have this ...


1

There is not such "rule" in the airline industry. It really depends of the airline's policy and the destination flights. Other than that, weekdays are usually busier as more people fly and there's always a huge demand for tickets. Less travelers decide to buy last minute ticket during the weekends, for example. The airfare goes down during the weekends to ...


1

Well, if the airlines change their policies, remove restrictions and make the tickets transferable, this would create a whole new market niche for resellers. If this happen there would be many complications related to liability of the resellers, quality guarantees, safety rules and more. It would be virtually impossible for the airlines to operate within the ...


11

You asked Why should the airline care if I depart on Tuesday and return Thursday of the same week, or the next week? and you answered: because business travelers will pay more. That's all there is to it. It's called price discrimination and it's practiced by just about any business that can get away with it -- all the more so in competitive ...


4

Basically, everything is now an “OV-chipkaart”. There are three main types of cards, all with an RFID chip in it: personal (for people with a discount card, yearly rail card and the like), “anonymous” (for infrequent use) and disposable (for punctual use). Depending on the card, you can load credit and travel using a pay-as-you-go system or directly load a ...


1

The GVB day pass costs 21 euros for 4 days (96 hours). You can use it in the tram, bus, metro of the GVB public transport company. See http://www.gvb.nl/ovinmamsterdam/Pages/bestdeal.aspx However if you want to use the OV-chipkaart you will have to have at least 20 euros on the card to travel with it. For example; You have 20 euros on the OV-kaart, and ...


4

Airlines aren't just in the business of selling "tickets" to seats. They are selling tickets to seats on different days. It's the "different days's" part that means that the same seat will sell for a lower price "in advance" and a higher price closer to the flight date. If you could re-sell the ticket to a friend, you could (theoretically) get the advantage ...


2

I realize there's already an accepted answer about "yield management" but, while their price discrimination strategy certainly exacerbates their rationale, I think that misses the point. I think the bigger reason is quite simply that they can get away with it. Let me expand on that. When most people book an airline ticket it's because they're planning to ...


1

If you are traveling with Emirates, check at their transfer desk - they will arrange the visa for you. Otherwise, for 12 hour transit you can get a transit visa at the counter right before immigration, and visit the city. However, you may not even need a visa depending on your nationality. It is best to check with the UAE immigration. Emirates provides a ...


1

Another reason might be that airlines tend to overbook planes, if they can. They expect a certain percentage of passengers to cancel their flight and want to prevent empty seats. If everyone found a replacement, there would not be enough seats on the plane for everyone!


3

Club Europe/World (Discounted). (A Business Class 'flavour'):


1

Transfers can be two ways. If they have to register the transfer then of course they should be able to control the flow of cash. HOWEVER, if they don't register it, as for example might the situation if I gave you my bus ticket then, apart from the economic factors, there are clearly a few accountability and safety factors. If the plane crashes for some ...


4

This may result in an abuse situation. You can think that a non-registered travel group bought so many tickets with different names on a certain flight, then start selling the tickets but for larger price. Unchangeable tickets will get rid of this situation and only registered travel companies can have legal deals with the airlines.


3

I think what Relaxed meant by "non-changeable fares" is tickets that are only valid for one specific flight at a given time and date and cannot be rebooked (or only for a considerable fee). Price-sensitive passengers will book those fares, but other passengers (mostly business) are willing to pay much higher fares for the luxury of not having to worry about ...


7

Another factor--sometimes life happens and you can't fly. In the old days you could simply sell your ticket to someone else, now you either have to eat a hefty change fee or lose it outright. That's money in their pockets that they didn't used to get.


7

According to cheapair.com, the price starts to skyrocket 30 days before the departure date. Quoting it, [Within 29 days] the increase began to accelerate and once you were within 14 days the fares really shot up dramatically. Their graph:


5

As a whole airfares do not increase, rather available fare classes sell out or become invalid. On average, a economy section can have 4 to 8 fare classes available, with a limited number of spaces available in each class. As the cheaper spaces get sold, then the reservation system shows the next higher fare that is still available. In years past, a fair ...


4

I am afraid the answer is going to be “it depends”. With low cost airlines at least, the increase is gradual and it's not uncommon to see markedly lower prices for flights at inconvenient times. So a ticket on such a flight might still be available at a given price a week out whereas similar tickets for a more attractive flight on the same day disappeared a ...


119

Airlines have a pricing strategy known as "yield management" or "revenue management" - they charge less for some seats than others, and expect these seats to be bought a long time in advance. They know that only a certain percentage of their customers are able to buy seats well in advance, and that those customers wouldn't fly if they couldn't get ...


1

The person whose credit card was used needs to be present when the other person checks in for their first flight. Once the card has been verified at check in, there will not be any need to verify it again when returning home. If by chance they are leaving at different times, then it is possible to go by the airport early or a city ticket office for the ...


1

No, when you book a ticket from point A to B then you have the right to travel only from A to B. That is because you pay only for the journey from A to B and not O to T. If there are other passengers who book tickets from O to A or B to A, the same seat might be allotted to them for those legs of the journey. In case there are no bookings for those legs, ...


4

I know this question is old, but the problem is still relevant. If you already have a ticket for Zone 100 and 200 you can buy a "Streifenkarte" (https://vag.tickeos.de/index.php/product/34/show/0/0/0/0) and stamp one strip for each zone. Example: You already have a ticket for The zones 100 and 200 and you want to go to Erlangen by train, you have to stamp ...


2

Prices are based on available seats within each fare class (and economy cabins can have numerous different fare classes or fare buckets in industry parlance). The fact that you found a lower fare closer to departure simply means that on that flight there are still cheaper seats available. Airlines start with X seats in a fare class, when those seats sell ...


1

I stayed in Brussels and then used the train system to visit each city I could one by one, while returning to brussels at night for my place to stay. They have '10 fare cards'...it's basically a ticket that has 10 open slots for you to write in...when you get on the train, fill the one line out and the conductor will stamp it when he takes your ticket. ...


6

There are a handful of high speed trains between Bruges and Brussels, but they're not very much quicker than the regular ones. So, unless you have a strong reason to take one of them (eg it's part of a longer Thalys or ICE journey), I'd suggest you skip those, and just go for the regular SNCB trains. Between Brussels and Bruges, you've basically got one ...


3

From Greyhound Australia's web page: Remember, with our Hop On Hop Off passes, you can get on and off as many times as you like, as long as you continue to travel in one direction. Each pass is valid for 6 months from date of purchase and 3 months once travel commences, so you have loads of time to experience the beauty of Australia! I suppose ...


0

,This trick is known to the airline and therefore a one way (OW) is never a 50% of a round trip (RT) but usually 70-130% (yes, sometimes even more then a RT). I can't see how 2 OW be less expensive then a RT (same airline?!) but assuming you're right - yes you can do that; it's perfectly legal from the airline POV. The only trick is that you should make ...


3

Yes, you can, but rarely would two one-ways be cheaper than a single return, so I suggest you start by doing more research. If you're planning to buy the one-way back to NZ at SA then you should consider that it's possible (though improbable, in my experience) that you'll be asked to present your return/onward ticket at some point on your way to SA. That ...



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