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22

Don't worry! Full middle names are never required on flight tickets, and even the initials are usually not needed. As long as the rest of the name and the initials match the passport, she will be fine.


18

You can travel the NS train either by buying a single ticket, or by using an OV-chipcard (Dutch: "OV chipkaart"). If you buy a single ticket it doesn't matter. If you travel with the OV-chipcard (as most people do), you pay for the distance you travel. The system needs to know how far you've traveled so you "check out" when you leave the platform. The ...


12

In principle overbooking does not happen in ryanair and in most LCCs. There might be other reasons but one of them is to assure that you take your hand luggage with you. Ryanair charges extra for checked in luggage therefore almost everyone carries hand luggage. This used to be a problem because there is not enough space inside the cabin for everyone to put ...


12

You can find some good information on all the possible Berlin public transport tickets on their English language website here. They have a few different short time-period based tickets, which include various tourist discounts. The discounts may or may not be of interest. Otherwise, you can get a day ticket (Tagesticket) for the AB zones for €6.90. That'll ...


12

The Internet was a game changer in many businesses and the travel agency world is no exception. Nowadays people can easily (this is arguable) find the cheapest price in a quick search; therefore, agencies need to present the best price to be able to sell since that's a key factor. How can they do this? (These are assumptions based on general commercial ...


11

Those people are scanning their 'OV chipkaart', and not their one way train tickets. Those cards are either prepaid or subscriptions and they need to check out to be billed for the actual trip they made. Failing to check out means getting charged more (because you might have made a way longer trip). With a one-way ticket there is no need to check out.


9

If it has your booking number on it, somebody could use it to access your reservation on the airline's website and tamper with it (e.g., cancel or change flights). An obvious countermeasure is to just blur if it is not essential for your purpose.


7

Get an Oyster Card or Use Your Contactless Payment Card If you plan on travelling a total of two journeys in two days then you won't need a 2-day travel ticket (nor 2 day travel cards) as that would be to expressive, as well as overkill. The simplest option would be to get two one way tickets covering the zones you need. These will definitely be cheaper ...


6

Todd from Flightfox here. I'd like to explain our major recent improvements, particularly the details of our price guarantees, to answer the original question. It's true that many things have changed with our format, policies, guarantees, processes, etc., over the past couple of years. These changes come from constantly trying to improve things for ...


6

Most people don't have tickets anymore but a pay-as-you-go RFID card like in many public transit systems (à la Oyster card). So you validate once to check in and another time to check out and determine the price of the ride. Of course, for single use tickets (paid in advance) it does not matter so much but some stations (e.g. Rotterdam) now have automatic ...


6

The point in reserving a seat is so that you are guaranteed (ish) a seat to sit in. It's especially useful in larger groups that wish to sit together. It does not limit you to that particular train. The National Rail Enquiries page on reservations says: When are reservations compulsory? On some routes around Bank Holidays. Sometimes you can only ...


6

It depends how detailed the boarding pass is! Probably the most useful information on the boarding pass is your frequent flier number. This is often printed in full. Together with your name, address and other information obtained elsewhere it may be possible for someone to purchase instant flights with the miles on the other side of the planet from your ...


6

People will know when you are not at home and might use this information to break into your home.


5

I will give you some practical reasons: Book now, pay later - this option is universally available at agents; very rarely available at the website. I use this all the time when I need to show a reservation (for example, as part of visa requirements) but do not want to commit to buying a ticket. Corporate accounts - a majority of agent's business is ...


4

If the flight has already transpired; then the risk is only that of information disclosure; of which there is limited use (all they would know is your name, which is easily Googled). I would blur the reservation number (if its printed on the boarding pass) for flights that are in the future as most airlines require just the last name and booking reference ...


4

No the validity of the ticket is not affected and moreover you may sit where you want on the actual train However if it is a busy train with no available seats (and this does happen off peak) you are entitled to your reserved seat, and this will be enforced by the train guard (in theory). In practise though I usually have no wish to eject someone less able ...


4

JUMP tickets are the classical paper tickets with a magnetic strip. They look like this: They have to be validated at the beginning of each journey, so each time you enter the metro or board a tram or bus. They don't have to be validated upon exit. JUMP tickets have to be inserted into the orange machines. The "red machine with the white eye" is for the ...


4

The "OV" as they call it can be used to determine your location of departure and location of arrival, so the price for your trip can be calculated automatically and can be subtracted from the "saldo" on the ov-ticket. So for example your location of departure (check-in) is Amsterdam Central. Let's say your going to Haarlem. At arrival in Haarlem you scan ...


4

I have not been to Berlin but a short google search did get me a page about a travel pass that also gives free entry to some museums, with a page in English. The site gives the option to buy online, as well as telling you where you can buy the pass. I can not help you whether you need to activate the pass, but when you first enter any public transport hold ...


4

Actually, it doesn't depend that much on whether it is on one ticket. More important is the quality of the IT infrastructure between the airlines, and second on the training (or interest!) of the check in agent. If the airlines get on well together and you have a competent check in agent, then the agent can do a "remote check in" for the second segment and ...


3

It it's booked on one ticket, the answer is yes. If it's on two separate tickets or bookings, the answer is no.


3

This is purely anecdotal, but I once showed up to an earlier flight due to timezone confusion. The checkin computer beeped at my boarding pass but the attendant did go to the trouble of checking my actual flight, saying if it was overbooked I could take this one as they had empty seats. However, the conversation only got as far as it did because I had no ...


3

There is no need to buy the Benelux Railpass. If you travel on InterCity (IC) trains, the trip will cost 53.30 EUR or 47 EUR if you are less than 26 years old. For IC trains in the Netherlands and Belgium, there is no advance purchase discount. Just buy the tickets as you go. There is even no need to commit to schedules in advance. Trains run very ...


3

You'll find that in Berlin especially you won't be asked for your ticket whenever you board your bus or U-Bahn train. I wasn't asked for a ticket at any point, although it is polite to show it to your driver if you are boarding your bus at the front. Inspectors are often disguised though, on my U-Bahn to the airport the inspectors unzipped their jackets to ...


3

There is no risk (or negligible risk) of being offloaded. There is a risk your bag will have to be stowed or put far away from you on the aircraft, which many people find irritating. I think most people get impatient, nervous or anxious when they see the flight is close to boarding—and simply do not want to sit any more. Either they join a queue or make a ...


2

I have the same issue when I travel as my name is extremely long as well. I've had them cut my name off, combine the names into one, and do all sorts of other things. But I have never had problems. I am sure the name is accurately documented somewhere in the system, it's just a space issue on any printed confirmation.


2

Alright here is my experience and what I think of how customers are treated on flightfox. I put my request in for a flight from from SYD - BRU (29/06/2015). I was without any say in it, given a guy as an 'expert' who read my request and probably just accepted it and slept on it. After 24 hours I get a message that he has started working on my flight and ...


2

I thnink they won't, because they want to avoid that people will do this as a strategy: "Book a cheap flight for 12:00, then come at 7:00 and fly with the expensive one."


2

It depends on the airline. Short answer: European airlines tend to be bad, USA and Asian airlines are quite good. Low cost carriers usually are terrible. First, no one knows if the flight is really overbooked until the flight is edited at the close of check in a few minutes before departure. Unexpected missed connections, people with visa/documentation ...


2

Try something with the following format: mm/dd/yyyy Such as 10/30/1981 for 30th of October 1981. If it still does not work, try again with different browsers, in this order: Firefox Google chrome Internet explorer (minimum version 10)



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