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119

TL;DR: If you know you're going, and there's a fare you can afford, book it. Waiting will almost never save you money, and never enough to offset paying double or triple the cheapo fare because you waited too long. Detailed explanation, with pictures: The problem is that there is no single "the price" that goes up and down. On any given flight you can buy ...


30

Appending MR etc seems to be a trend (ie becoming more commonplace) for air tickets/boarding passes and, particularly when names are relatively long, this might be without a space. Examples: Since very likely Aegean's custom, their staff should cope with interpreting this. The key point may be that the website you refer to does indeed recognise you ...


25

For domestic flights in the US, the cheapest price is almost always on the airline's website. Additionally, airlines sometimes include other benefits like additional frequent flyer miles, reduced baggage fees etc. for booking directly through their site. Online travel agents such as Expedia, Travelocity, Orbitz etc. can sometimes find flight combinations ...


24

If you're only going to be travelling within London (i.e. not starting outside of London, and not visiting outside of London), then by far and away your best bet is an Oyster Card. TFL have a very good website on the Oyster Card, with details of how to get one. They also have a dedicated Visitors to London section including a handy intro video. One of the ...


24

A number of airlines will append your title (MR, MRS, etc) to your first name when they issue your boarding passes, so it appears as SURNAME/FIRSTNAMEMR. It can appear this way on the gate agent's terminal as well. I have not had any personal experience with Aegean Airline's system, so can not say with 100% certainty, but likely you are OK.


23

Many of the major airlines do have self-service checkin machines at the airport. I know KLM, allows printing forgotten or failed prints. If your airlines does not have these self service machines, and you are not yet at the airport, try going to a print or copyshop. Most airports these days have these shops, but sometimes they can have quite some waiting ...


23

A few reasons: a final sanity check that you didn't walk down the wrong corridor. Some gates have two 'legs'. Or you could have snuck on or something. On larger planes, to see what aisle you should walk down. Otherwise people will randomly choose one and spend time climbing over seats and getting in the way. They're on a time schedule, and want you ...


23

First of all, it doesn't matter where you're flying from. What really matter is what airline you are flying with, so the short answer is: it depends. Some airlines, in an attempt to fight frauds, may ask you to show the card and if you fail to do so they CAN refuse to embark you. I once flew Royal Jordanian from Milano Malpensa to Amman and I was asked to ...


23

Yes. In my experience while you can't get a refund, you can get a credit. If the airline won't give you a credit, you can give yourself one like this: determine the change fee for your flight. In this example I'll use $150. remind yourself of the price you paid for your flight. I'll use $1000. find a flight a long way in the future that costs just under ...


22

You can do that. since one-way tickets are always more expensive. Booking a flexible return ticket will also be more expensive than the single ticket version, but you should look into it, since it should be cheaper than the double-return tickets in most cases. But you better make sure that you know where and how to buy a ticket in Hong Kong and how much it ...


21

Although they accomplish the same purpose for the end user, travel websites have different 'structures'. Kayak and SkyScanner for instance are 'travel search engines' - they simply search multiple airline websites, hotel sites, other online travel agents etc and then present the results. You'll notice that once you click on a result, you will be redirected ...


20

An acronym for 'Secondary Security Screening Selection' or 'Secondary Security Screening Selectee' which is an airport security measure in the United States and Canada which selects passengers for additional inspection Though there is no published criteria how passengers are selected for SSSS, Wiki page lists few probable ones.


19

What you want is an "open return" ticket. The outgoing flight is confirmed and the return is "open". Depending on the type of ticket, the return can be up to a year after departure. You can book the return ticket after departure--subject to availability of course. Sometimes you can even change a confirmed return without penalty. You'll probably have to buy ...


18

They are not standard codes actually, sometimes they are similar but not always. NONREF: Non-refundable. 0VALUAFTDPT: 0 value after scheduled departure. If you want to make any change make it before the departure time or the ticket has no value at all. CHGFEE: There is a change fee in case you want to change times.


18

For most journeys, only one train company can cover that route, so there's no comparison involved. For your journey from London to Newcastle-upon-Tyne, the only option is to use East Coast. When there are multiple companies, you can check using "National Rail Enquiries" which can search all the companies. A good example is London-Birmingham, for which ...


17

Short Answer Yes! Typically you will find a ticket conductor on-board who will check tickets in the start. Try to contact him beforehand in order to ensure risk free travel. The ticket conductor can help you purchase a ticket on-board the train. The ticket will be a little bit more expensive, but it is certainly possible. This is clearly mentioned on the ...


16

The obvious answer is to pay for your tickets! Presuming you have solid travel plans (which is what they are trying to ask you to prove by showing tickets!) then this shouldn't be a problem. Of course, the one catch with this is that if your visa application is rejected, you've now got tickets that you are unable to use. Some airlines will allow you to ...


16

The catch is that if you book the tickets separately and then the flight from A to B is delayed, causing you to miss the flight from B to C, it becomes your problem to arrange for alternative transport from B to C. The airline has no obligations towards you, even if it was their own delayed flight that caused the issue. Worse still, if the B->C ticket had a ...


16

It is at the discretion of the one checking your boarding pass but since they generally want you to have a good experience with them, obvious inacuracies are often let go. For a reversed name case, I really would not worry about it. All the parts are there and correctly spelled, so that would be easy to understand. Foreign airport personnel might not even ...


15

When proof of onward travel is required, it is always the job of an airline to check whether your documentation is in place. If not, and if you have to be deported, I believe in this situation the airline has to bear the cost of flying you back; this is standard practice around the world. Malaysia implements these requirements pretty unevenly. Citizens of ...


15

The most simple answer to this is "because they can"! In most markets International airfares are priced on a directional basis, so AAA-BBB-AAA will be priced completely differently to BBB-AAA-BBB, and it's extremely common for the prices to vary wildly between the two origins. Sometimes the price different at a point in time is simply due to a "sale" going ...


15

As you may have already found out on the Disney site, there are various "park hopper" tickets that let you go to more than one park on the same day. We spent an entire week at Disney World in 2009 and didn't see everything. That was staying at a Disney hotel close to Epcot, with early admission and late exit to/from the parks (only available to ...


15

Given that there are so many free sites in London such as the British Museum, the National Portrait Gallery, the Tate Britain and the Tate Modern (before you even fit in time for sightseeing), I would suggest that £46 is money that could be spent elsewhere. If you bought passes like that on such a short trip, you would spend more time worrying about what ...


15

Yes, I have seen this on many occasions, on flights to USA, Europe and Australia with multiple connections. The scenario is exactly as you describe - at the airport where they cannot be checked through, you need to pick up your luggage then check it back in for the next leg of your journey. A long as you plan for it, it ends up just being a mildly ...


14

Go to the airport anyway. Most likely you will end up with a seat. If not, the airline will take care of you and get you to your destination on another flight. Some possible explanations: The flight is overbooked. If someone else fails to show up for the flight, you'll have a seat. If not, they will offer incentives (vouchers for future travel) for ...


14

One major concern is that some airlines don't like it when you drop tickets (legs or entire flights) because it's cheaper for you. As a result, not turning up can be held against you and any frequent flyer program that you might hold with them. I don't know of anyone personally that's had theirs cancelled or penalised, but have seen it mentioned ...


14

There are a number of times and cutoffs and activities that happen before a plane leaves. How long these activities take depends on how many people are involved, in other words on the size of the plane. These include: paging passengers who have yet to demonstrate they'll be admitted to the target country, and looking at their passports. The more people ...


14

It certainly can be done -- is it reasonable, well that depends on your definition ... You're going to have two major issues here. Visas You likely need visas for the places you're visiting (Russia, Mongolia, China), and they will need proof of onwards travel. You'll likely have to get a specialist to help anyway and the overall visa validity is going ...


13

In general you shouldn't see what you're seeing here - especially for multiple dates, which makes me think that it's possibly either a website error, or a scam of some form. Airlines do have multiple prices for each flight, and a limited number of seats available in each class. ie, one specific flight might have 5 seats available for $100, another 10 seats ...


13

I have had SSSS once. I extended my stay - I was supposed to fly home let's say Thursday night, but Thursday morning I changed my tickets so I would fly home Friday night. When I checked in I was specifically told by the checkin agent that the change was the reason for the SSSS - I was taking a flight I had booked the previous day. She, and everyone else ...



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