Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

There are a number of elephant camps in Chiang Mai that treat the elephants well. There are several tourist camps, Lampang Elephant Conservation Center, Mae Sa Elephant Camp, Chiang Dao Elephant Camp. These camps have been around for 30+ years, have their own veternarians on staff, provide all the needs of the mahouts and elephants, raise the young in camp ...


3

I lived in Chiang Mai for over two years but never got around to visiting one of the few elephant parks in the region. There are a few parks that are known for their fair treatment of elephants, it not being uncommon the elephants at these parks to have been sourced from circuses and whatnot, where they would have been treated, well, not very well. I don't ...


1

I lived in Chiang Mai for 2.5 years until 2010 or so and never considered malaria a problem. Nor did anyone I knew. But, drug resistant malaria is becoming a problem in Thailand: http://m.bbc.com/news/health-31533559 That said, taking drugs to prevent drug-resistant malaria is pointless, too.


0

Don't forget to drink quinine - often in 'tonic water'. I understand this to be very beneficial with treatment if you do happen to get malaria. Seems to make sense to have quinine tabs on hand, although WHO recommends quinine as secondary treatment now.


1

Quoting the CDC's Infectious Diseases Related To Travel / Thailand page, Areas with malaria: Rural, forested areas that border Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, and Laos. Rural, forested areas in districts of Phang Nga and Phuket. None in the cities of Bangkok, Chiang Mai, Chiang Rai, Koh Phangan, Koh Samui, Pattaya, Phang Nga, and Phuket. Estimated ...


7

Personally I would be far more worried about Dengue, as you are traveling during the rainy season. Many more people catch Dengue than Malaria, partially because there is no preventative medicine (and Dengue is no fun, I speak from experience). The Thai government does record a number of cases of Malaria each year, but in terms of percentages and risks, it ...


4

No, they're not really needed. Thailand is close to (if not quite) malaria-free, and the neighboring countries are generally considered low-risk as well. If you take sufficient precautions while trekking (bug spray, long pants and shirts, sleeping in tents with netting, etc), malaria prophylaxis would be overkill. And since personal anecdotes are more ...


-1

For those who want to know how to go to Khao San Road from the airport i posted it on my blog. Added some travel tips as well for everyone who are planning to do the same trip in Thailand. If you have additional questions just comment on my blog and i will answer you as soon as i can. :) ...


23

The haze in northern Thailand is indeed a yearly phenomenon, but the main driver for it is local farmers burning fields to prepare for planting in the following wet season. Since it's the dry season, there's nothing to contain or tamp down the smoke and dust, plus there's 'normal' air pollution from cities, cars etc in the region. Throw in the local ...


9

While I can't be sure, I think this is a case of haze due to smoke from biomass burning. There was an episode with a lot of burning events in February and March in Northern South-East Asia (the pictures are satellite pictures where active fires are highlighted). This has been reported in the region (news article, Singapore meteorological service), and is a ...


2

It is hard to know what sort of cross checking the Thai Immigration computers do when your passport is scanned. My guess is that they only look to see if your passport has entered Thailand in recent years/months and they look to see if you are on any criminal watch lists. But that is just a guess. If your UK passport number was recorded when you reported ...


5

As you are visiting during the low season (or green season as many call it since it is also rainy season), most flights will not sell out in advance. But that said, there is only one flight each day direct from Chiang Mai to Koh Samui, so if you plan to use that flight, then booking ahead might be a good idea. If you plan to stop in Bangkok enroute from CM ...


0

Still the same. You'd be issued a 30-day visa-free stay upon arrival. I think the 15 days should only apply if you arrived in Thailand, by land, from a neighboring country. You could also apply for a single entry visa in your home country, allowing you to stay in Thailand for 90 days.


0

I agree with Tom. Songthaews and tuktuks will make you appreciate Chiang Mai more, and they're definitely a more affordable option. If you have to deal with a car rental company, be very wary and make sure to Google it up and contact the best ones. You might wanna check out EasyTerra.



Top 50 recent answers are included