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1

Give-away shops ("weggeefwinkels") are quite different from what you're describing but they might suit your needs very well. Here is a list. This article has extensive information about sharing stuff in the Netherlands. It's in Dutch but translates well through Google Translate.


4

If an airline is planning to open a new route, especially international routes, they will need a long list of approvals before they can operate that route. Usually this process is a bureaucratic process since it involves many organizations (civil aviation authorities, airport authorities, etc.). Anyway, airlines usually have a green light to open the route ...


-1

Any country can emit a passport for any person regardless of its citizenship. Case in point, France does not recognize a passport as a proof of citizenship for its own citizen. (In BOLD here and here for french readers) The passport is an official travel document stating to other countries that the holder is recognized as specified. Having a passport from a ...


2

On the Indian Passport we have three things i.e. Nationality Place of Issue Place of Birth Not sure if this is common in other countries though, but we don't do country of issue, we do place of issue. So an Indian Passport page would look like this, Here, as you may note, there is a place of issue as well as a place of birth which are very specific ...


5

It's difficult to know precisely without context but there are few cases where this could be relevant, in particular: Travel documents other than passports (e.g. refugee travel documents) are issued by the country where the person resides and indicate that the holder can be readmitted to the country of issue even though they are still citizens of another ...


18

Although not common, some countries issue passports to non-citizens as well. As you may have noticed, the data page of a passport often states the nationality or citizenship of the holder in a separate field and the citizenship may actually differ from the issuing country. One example is laissez-passer documents or emergency passports, which may be issued ...


6

From the ESTA website (which I was reading just as you posted the question!): Your "Country of Issue" is the same as your "Country of Citizenship". For instance, if you are a citizen of the United Kingdom, but are getting your passport from the UK Consulate in Hong Kong, the UK is your country of issue. The UK Consulate may be located in Hong Kong, ...



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