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2

"Bio" invariably either refers to biology (e.g., biochemistry, bio-informatics, biodegradability, bio-weapons) or is an abbreviation for biography (used on its own or, e.g., in biopic). In the context of travel, it's also the IATA code for Bilbao airport. In this case, only the second makes sense: it's asking for the photo page of your passport that has ...


6

The bio-date page of a passport is the page with your biographical data (name, date of birth, passport number, expiration date, etc...). Most passports will also show your picture on this page, along with the machine readable zone at the bottom. Examples: Public domain Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:GhanaianBio-pp.jpg


19

A stopover is the time period between two consecutive flights above a certain duration and is typically used for a multi-day period. So, say you're flying from London to Miami and want to spend a few days in New York, you would book a flight with a stopover in New York. A layover is a connection between two consecutive flights that doesn't count as a ...


19

Visas for many many years were placed in your passport using a rubber stamp, same as most entry and exit stamps are done today. And there are still countries that use rubber stamps for visas today. Hence the slang for getting visas evolved to being "stamped" and the visa itself was termed a "visa stamp". While modern visas have evolved to stickers with ...


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The confusion arises out of different terminology that some people use due to misconceptions about what a US "visa" is. Technically, the "visa" is what some people call the "visa stamp", which is the physical sticker that is placed into the passport. A US visa is solely for traveling to the US to apply to enter. A US visa only has to be valid on the day of ...


4

The physical visa in a passport is frequently referred to by a number of names. For US visas, the term "Stamp" is commonly used, whilst for other countries it might be a "foil" or a "sticker". The term "stamp" dates back to the days when Visas generally were a full-page stamp, which would then have the details of the visa written into boxes/areas within the ...



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