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13

The word you are looking for is haikyo (廃墟, "ruin"), and Japan has plenty of them for pretty much every conceivable category of building... except temples and shrines. Unlike corporate enterprises that get abandoned as soon as they stop making money, temples and shrines were never intended as money-making enterprises in the first place, so their costs are ...


8

General considerations There are several temples in the Kyoto area as well as Osaka which allow you to do this. However, not everyone every day. So you should check one of the several different lists of temples (one, two, three) offering anything between overnight stays, vegetarian food, copying sutras with a brush pen (which cleanses your mind), zazen ...


8

Great answer by jpatokal. One more thing to add to the kaimyō topic is that Japanese temples are run by private people as a business under something you could call a "religion business license" which is 100% tax-free. These businesses however do not only operate religious services such as funerals but also a lot of other non-religious operations such as golf ...


7

TL;DR: Don't worry about it. I've stayed in lots of temples and shrines in Japan, and their accommodations are effectively identical to "secular" Japanese inns: for example, you'll be offered alcohol with meals, and boisterous drinking parties for traveling groups are not uncommon, particularly in Shinto shrine lodges. Of course, the usual rules of ...


6

Mt. Fuji is one of Japan's "Three Holy Mountains" (三霊山 Sanreizan) along with Mt. Tate, in the Toyama Prefecture, and Mt. Haku, in the Hokuriku region. If you want to be immersed in Shinto religion, I'd recommend visiting Kyoto. There's lot of temples and shrines to see, and lots to do and even more to eat. Spending just a day there wouldn't do the city ...


5

The Daisen-in and Shunkoin have open medidation meetings (Information in English, the latter explicitly says instruction is in English), not free but reasonably priced. According to this forum: Rinzai and Soto zen temples should have a weekly zazenkai that is open to the public. It should be free, but donations are accepted (and probably expected, ...


5

Indeed as Doc says, it was Wat Sok Pa Luang, more commonly written as Wat Sokpaluang or, in Lao, "ວັດໂສກປ່າຫຼວງ". Sokpaluang is also the name of the suburb or region of Vientiane where it's located. The Wat is apparently also known as "The Jungle Temple". Sadly, in answer to the part of your question If it still exists? and according to reviewers on ...


5

Sounds like you're referring to 'Wat Sok Pa Luang'. I haven't been, but a few of the people I was traveling with in Laos did go and seemed to enjoy it. Any of the local taxi or tuk-tuk drivers will know how to get there. I don't recall the price, but I'm sure now that you know the name Google will be able to give you no end of information on it.


3

Hatsumōde (the year's first visit of a Shinto shrine, less commonly a Buddhist temple) happens not necessarily on the 1st - some people do it on the 2nd or 3rd (or already on new year's eve). Expect popular shrines such as the Meiji Shrine to be extremely crowded so that it can take an hour or more to get to the front - but many people will wear traditional ...


3

Shinto is at heart an animist religion that imbues many natural features (rivers, trees, mountains) with spirits, and Japanese buddhism has been influenced heavily by this, so yes, "sacred mountains" are pretty common in Japan. For Buddhism, sacredness is usually centered around places where famous Buddhist teachers lived, taught or are buried. The two ...


3

When I went to Japan I wanted to hunt for some abandoned places as well, even though I was mostly interested in modern-looking places like Nara Dreamland. Anyway, my starting point was Jordy Meow's site. He is a French photographer based in Tokyo specializing in urban exploration. Temple of Lies* is just an example. Beware that he doesn't give any ...


1

Bangkok has so many temples, most biggest and famous are Wat Po and Wat Arun. They are just opposite of each other along the river Chao Praya. You should take the boat along the river, as it is an interesting experience as well. If you have ample time probably you want to visit Ayutthaya, the old capital, especially when you like buildings, palaces, foreign ...



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