Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

My boyfriend and I (female) were able to rent a private room at the Blue Baths in September '10. Okay, here's the Long Answer: At any one of the baths, it is possible to rent a private room, exclusive of massage and kisa (skin scrub). From my personal experience, The Royal Baths have the single best/nicest room (gorgeous blue paneled "dressing room" with ...


9

Typically there is very little amount of snow in Tbilisi which usually melts in a day or two in most parts of the city but it can also pile up and go icy (in 2008 we had snow for about three weeks). Wind and rain is more common. I'm not sure what you mean by 'special winter clothes' but a sweater and a coat should be enough most of the time. You will also ...


7

Take the train to Makhinjauri (also transcribed Makhindjauri) - that's the closest passenger station to Batumi. (Though you can just as well ask for a ticket to Batumi.) There's currently one night train every day, which departs Tbilisi at 22.45 and arrives at 7.25 (the one from Batumi to Tbilisi leaves at 22:25). So the travel time is 8h 40min. The train ...


6

If such exists, they are a well kept secret. You'll likely have to do this in stages. The most attractive option I could find (excluding flights) would be to take trains as far as Istanbul and then there is a bus from Istanbul to Tbilisi. The train segment is about 50 hours (including three nights where you could opt for comfortable sleeping compartments ...


6

There is a train from Bucharest to Istanbul every day at 12:20 pm, it merges with the train from Sofia in Eastern Bulgaria and arrives in Istanbul at 7:30 the next morning. One source mentions 36 Euros as the price. There are also buses going directly from Bucharest to Istanbul taking 18 hours. I am not sure about the prices but I travelled on trains and ...


6

Following my own advice from my answer to Is there an equivalent to “The Man in Seat Sixty-One” for bus travel?, I looked on the Lonely Planet page for Tbilisi: A minifleet of four or five buses run by different companies departs at noon for Istanbul (US$40, 27 hours) via the border at Sarpi, Hopa, Rize They leave from the second bus terminal: ...


6

During the Soviet period, some scientific research center was established in this building (don't remember the profile of them, any more). In the late 1990s the building was granted by Georgia to the Greek state as a residence for the Greek ambassador in Tbilisi. The building still is uninhabited and looks "as is" now.


6

Damn, I wanted to wait for 2 days with answer for this question, and now it had activity :) All I could find is quite uncertain, but it is better than nothing. During the war for independence between Greece and Turkey in 19th century, many Greeks migrated to the Russian Empire, in Georgia. Most of them lived in Tsalka, but many of them had some property in ...


5

From the official timetable of Georgian Railways. There is a train #202/201 Tbilisi - Yerevan which leaves at 8:20pm and arrives 7am. This train leaves Tbilisi on odd dates such as was yesterday and when you have 31 days in a month skips the 1st. This train will go back the next day such today leaving Yerevan at 10 pm and arriving to Tbilisi at 9 am EDITED ...


4

If you are really really curious I may suggest to ask the question directly to the Greek embassy officials in Tbilisi www.greekembassy.ge or maybe contact to tbilisiguide.ge The building is located at the "Sololaki Alley".


4

A Dutch travel site called hansrossel.com has a page on Telavi including how to get there from Tbilisi: Travel by public transport : Bus Tbilisi - Telavi, since 2002 there are brand new busses running 5 times per day (last bus departs around 17:00) from Samgori station (reachable by metro), about 2 hours traveling. (from Didube station there are no ...


4

It turns out that Ortachala and Didube are not the only places to catch a bus or marshrutka in Tbilisi. It's easier to find the departure times on the Internet when you know the names of the others. Here is the full info compiled from the official government published Tbilisi Guide tourist information handbook: By bus Ortachala (ორთაჭალა) a.k.a Tbilisi ...


4

How's your russian? If good take a look at the discussion on batumionline.net If not I will attempt to translate: Marshrutkas are leaving from multiple places for Batumi. From the Railway Station starting at 8 in the morning and leaving every hour or if full. There those leaving from the Sports Palace starting at 9 and then every hour. From Didube but ...


4

That's a lot of questions! Should I hire a car or are there tours available to tourist areas? You probably don't need a car, the public transport in Tbilisi is pretty efficient, and when it's not it's still interesting :-) Are there regular bus services? Yes, there is a metropolitan bus service. Most locals use the minibuses that you have to wave down. ...


3

Yes, taxis are available 24/7. A simple Google search revealed: http://www.tbilisiairport.com/en-EN/Transportation/Pages/Taxi.aspx Also: http://www.info-tbilisi.com/usefulinfos/taxi/ You can book at least one service online, but it appears to be just the equivalent of a paper form. Perhaps your best bet is this: http://www.airport-transfer.ge/


3

Yes." ...or in the customers' service offices located in Tbilisi (46/50 M. Kostava Street) and Batumi (5 Mazniashvili Street)" Those two offices look like the only two they have. Relevant Google map of the area.


3

Well, I did the trip today. Here goes: There are indeed minibusses scheduled from Sheki to Balakan at 1010 and 1400. I took the 1010 minibus. This minibus that was supposed to go to Balakan (as told by the clerk at the bus station and agreed to by the driver) actually only went as far sa Zaqatala. Here, I was bundled into another minibus, that did go to ...


3

Wikitravel's article on Sheki (aka Shaki) seems to make it at least somewhat clear: (Balakan is the border town, about 12km from the crossing with Georgia.) By taxi: A taxi is also a fine, if more expensive, way to get to Georgia, and you should have no trouble finding a taxi, bus, or marshrutka onward from the border at Lagodekhi to Tbilisi. By Minibus ...


3

About security: it's become very safe to travel! As I understand nature of georgians even drunk they don't cause trouble even they will like to invite you to share their drinking. About mini-buses: there is a lot of mini-buses waiting for costumers just outside train station. It is cheap but not comfortable. But you can see a lot during travel. Since ...


3

Yes, there are plans to reopen at least two of them. The cable car mentioned in Karlson's answer has been completed and operating for roughly a year now, but is a new route with new stations in new locations that did not previously have any of the older cable cars in Tbilisi. But I only just discovered today by chance an answer on a Georgian website called ...


2

Buses are leaving from the Ortachala bus station 4 buses a week 20 Lari from Tbilisi to Baku Source: OnTheStreet For times and confirmation of the service, I would still go over to the bus station. The Lonely Planet page for Tbilisi also mentions buses from Marneuli (30km south of Tbilisi) to Baku.


2

I could find no reference about route Tbilisi-Chiatura. There are references to possible Train service from Kutaisi or Zastapone, but no links exists. You might have to visit the train station to get more accurate information. There are references to buses going from Kutaisi to Sachkhere but again nothing online so it will have to be found out on the ...


1

I don't know about direct, but you could do it in two legs. There are plenty of busses from Tbilisi to Istanbul and then there are more from Istanbul to Thessaloniki which cost around 95 lira.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible