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63

Almost all tap water in the US is drinkable. The exceptions are generally noted and announced and temporary.


47

Tap water in MA is quite drinkable; I've lived here for over 30 years, drinking it. No funny colors or odors, either.


34

Yes, tap water in the US is regularly tested and drinkable except when explicitly noted. For example, here in Portland, Oregon we usually have a "boil alert" (i.e. boil your tap water before drinking it) about once a year for a couple days because a regular sample indicates possible E. Coli contamination. There usually isn't, but they get the warning out ...


21

The other answerers have answered your question about whether it is safe. I'd like to address the issue of chlorinated water not being very pleasant to drink by explaining how to dechlorinate the chlorinated water. You can reduce that chloriney taste somewhat, mainly by aerating the water. I kept tropical fish for years and you can't use chlorinated water ...


21

My understanding is that chlorine, in the concentrations found in drinking water, does not pose an acute health danger. There may be health risks associated with long-term exposure, and this is a more controversial topic, where the literature and expert opinions are mixed. Most main-stream information seems to suggest it's safe, but the skeptics claim a ...


17

The Netherlands certainly doesn't have that many public taps as other countries. Maybe also because the regular tap water is of very good quality. But the recent years more and more taps are placed. Mostly to advertise against bottled water, and help people who use own (recycled) bottles. I know of two websites / apps which have a map of taps: ...


16

No, you just got lucky. Virtually everywhere in the world, tap water is fine when it leaves the processing plant, the problem is what happens between the processing plant and the tap you drink it from. If there's a leaky water pipe with another leaky sewage pipe dripping on to it, you're screwed. This is also why flooding and heavy rains often make tap ...


16

First off, except in the case of short-term disasters, tap water is safe to drink everywhere in the United States. In the US, the Environmental Protection Agency regulates tap water quality. The Food and Drug Administration regulates bottled water as a food. EPA standards are stricter than FDA standards. For bottled water products that are bottled and sold ...


16

My parents live in the countryside (in the UK, not Colombia, admittedly), their tap water comes from a natural spring. They don't drink it. The problem is the water like this tends to be in the open have a lot of crap can get in there. Including literal crap, live and dead animals, chemicals from farms and other businesses, etc, etc. The closer you get to ...


16

Water regulations in Switzerland are very strict and most tap water is of impeccable quality. There is also a law which states that any fountain, which doesn't have regulated drinking water, has to be declared as such, so if you see a fountain with no sign on a village square, it's very likely safe to be drunk. This is most likely the reason why there is a ...


15

No, tap water is usually not safe to drink in India. Households commonly buy large, office cooler type bottles of drinking water or have in-house filtration systems. So if it's a normal tap, then don't drink from it. The exception is if the tap has a cooling or a filtration unit next to it. (I can't find a free image for this to include here.) These could ...


14

Even though I do not recommend anyone to drink tap water in India and the 18 years of my life I was born and brought up in Delhi, I had no idea that you could drink tap water in other countries. Fortunately, I know much more now. Tap water in India is certainly filtered and chlorinated and all the other things one would expect in any other country. It is ...


13

I asked my Turkish friends and here's what they had to say: although major cities do have water filtration plants and water is considered drinkable at the source, the quality of water pipes that supply it within a building or in specific localities might be suspect. You are, thus, better off not drinking tap water straight unless you're using it after ...


13

I'm living in a high populated area (at least for NZ's standard) in Auckland, but the question goes for the whole country. Yes. Except in exceptional circumstances, NZ tapwater is universally safe to drink. Standards exist to ensure that major contaminating organisms such as Protozoa and Cryptosporidium are removed or reduced to safe levels. Auckland ...


13

U.S. municipal water systems provide drinkable tap water. Most of them add chlorine compounds to sterilize the water. (Of course, if you want to be certain that the water is sterile, you need to boil it or chemically treat it yourself.) Many also add fluoride compounds, allegedly to prevent dental cavities. The biggest problem with American "tap water" ...


12

I was advised by both locals and colleagues who'd travelled to India to even be careful which bottled water you drink, as some (such as refilled glass bottles provided in hotel rooms) are filled from tap water. The rule of thumb I was given was to stick to brewery brands, as most have related bottled water brands. These have filtration and other sterilising ...


12

This is hard to answer with an authoritative source since the quality of non-potable water varies widely from the source it comes from (is it groundwater? river water? is there anything recycled from drainwater from houses?) and even within a country. I'm speaking mostly from my experience living in India, but in practice I have seen similar practices in ...


12

I live in Izmir and have travelled in Istanbul many times. Tap water all over Turkey including big cities is a hit-or-miss affair. It's not guaranteed to kill you, but it doesn't generally taste that good and drinking it is considered a bad idea just in case. Most cities try to treat it enough to make it non-dangerous, but that doesn't make it good water. ...


12

Tap water is always drinkable in Italy, especially in the cities (of course, it may be a little bit different if you are talking about a cottage in the middle of nowhere). The real question is how good is that. For instance, in Rome the water has a very strong percentage of limestone and it taste doesn't very good. For this reason, several people tends to ...


10

Yes tap water is safe in Shkodër, I was born there, grew up drinking that water. I live in New York and I can tell you that the water there has a diff taste regardless if it's tap or from a bottle, but make sure to keep very cold in the fridge so you won't notice the difference. Have fun while you're there. About the tourists, they're all gone by the end of ...


10

Short answer - you'll need to ask the property to be sure. All the mains tap water will be fine to drink everywhere in the UK and Ireland. However... Some hostels may have a tank which feeds some of their taps, so you may find that the taps in the kitchen are mains-fed and fine, but the ones in bathrooms (for an example) could be fed via the tank, and may ...


10

I would personally advise against it, unless you plan on staying there for a long time and are trying to get used to it. I found a UN report about water quality in Laos. You should read it for yourself to get the details, but here in short: Most water sources/wells seem to pose a health risk. There is little contamination with chemicals and the like, so ...


10

I don't think you can make any assumptions about future trips just because of this single trip. There are just too many variables to say that you will be fine every trip in the future, e.g. The specific bugs in a water source can vary over time. If you were immune to some, you may not be immune to the ones next time around. If there has been a lot of ...


10

You cannot build up a resistance to every water-borne disease. Of the diseases you can build up an immunity to, there are more than one, and you have to build up immunity to each of them. You can only build up immunity by exposure, often by getting sick and recovering, sometimes more than once. The little bit of local water you drank is unlikely to have ...


9

I long ago gave up worrying. I find I get sick so often (esp in third world countries) that I now just assume I will, carry a bog roll (toilet paper), and some Immodium (medicine to help prevent the need to run to the toilet every few minutes). It's not ideal, and if it happens, there are ways to prevent the infamous Delhi Belly. However, there are some ...


9

According to Wikipedia, the Reedy Creek Improvement District provides water for WDW, and they do not add fluoride, but there is roughly 0.10 ppm of fluoride found in the water. There are also reports that the water at WDW tastes horrible, so you may want to consider bottled water aside from the issue of fluoride. As a general rule, when traveling, if you ...


9

On top of what has been written by @toy and @user34936, which I can support 100%, I would like to give you the following advice: When traveling to remoter areas in Asia (I would count Laos into that), and specially if you do not do so frequently (several times a year), you are risking to get Diarrhea as a minimum and intestinal parasites as a worst case ...


9

Yes. The chlorine is put in there exactly in order to make it safe to drink by killing germs. If tap water is not chlorinated, it can mean one of two things: either the place has no regulations concerning germ counts in tap water and whether it's safe to drink is basically up to luck. or there are such regulations and the water provider is able to ensure ...


8

You don't have to leave North America to find non-potable water - the cottage I used to visit for decades drew its water from the lake, and this was used for showers, toilet flushing, dishwashing, and even for water-that-would-be-boiled eg for pasta or mashed potatoes. Eventually it developed a colour that nobody liked and we switched to using bottled water ...



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