Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I've travelled around rural parts of Russia, Mongolia, China and other countries where English is not widely spoken and few tourists go without knowing the native languages myself. As others have said, it's surprising how much you can communicate without using language when you have the need. My advice is to bring along some phrase books which list phrases ...


5

I rode my bicycle around the whole of Taiwan. English is spoken a bit more in Taipei than other places, but it's hit-or-miss everywhere. I found a tea shop in Taipei where the staff did not understand "tea" or any other relevant words...but a helpful local next in line stepped up to translate. As with many places in the world, younger people (under 30) ...


11

I was in Taiwan in August. Very few problems in Taipei; there's usually someone around who can speak some English, and failing that, hand signals and waving and pointing goes a long way. In addition, many of the signs are in English as well. Even in the markets, you could point, or some friendly person would take you where you wanted to go. Probably in ...


2

It's hard to write an answer that rules all. But from my experience, booking sites do not charge (or authorize) your card if it's a reservation that is either free or you will pay by alternative means (cash payment at the hotel). Booking sites ask your card details anyway for two things: - confirm your identity. To prevent any bad reservations (a ...


5

It is very common in many parts of Asia and Africa for people to adopt Western names, especially English ones, and to use them even in local contexts. So in terms of travel, do not be suspicious if a stranger says he is Christopher or she is Emily. In some cases, it is simply can be one of many names someone adopts. In traditional Chinese culture, one can ...



Top 50 recent answers are included