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14

You can, but the travel is a bit on the unconventional side. Most shipping companies will accept passengers at a relatively cheap rate and you can just tag along. I live in Manila, my father in law runs one such company, my brother in law is a cook for another. There are some caveats: You're surrounded by 'salty sailors', which may or may not be ...


13

Unfortunately in this case common sense trumps political pride: entering Taiwan is considered leaving China, and you'll thus need a multiple-entry visa to get back to the mainland. (Incidentally, the same applies to Hong Kong and Macau.) I'm having trouble finding an authoritative source, but this random Chinese visa agent (apparently banned here, replace ...


11

I don't think your Japanese will be much help, except for interacting with Japanese tourists. Where there are guides or directions in Japanese, there will almost certainly be guides or directions in English. Your kanji may help with Taiwanese signs or Korean newspaper headlines, but Japanese is not related to Mandarin and distantly if at all to Korean, aside ...


10

Your visa will indicate how many times you are permitted to enter China under that visa. On the first line, there should be a field "ENTRIES" with a letter and a chinese character following it. If that letter is M, you are eligible for multiple entries. China also has single and double-entry visas; presumably, those would be the letters S and D respectively. ...


8

TL;DR: You shouldn't. Taiwan is nowhere near as "bow-heavy" as Japan, but the same rule applies: foreigners are not expected to know or understand how to bow, and that's fine. Anybody meeting or being introduced to you is going to shake hands Western style. If you see people bowing at temples, funerals, whatever, what they're doing is none of your ...


8

According to this Google search it is the 'Stairs (or Stairway) to Heaven' in Yushan National Park.


7

As mentioned by Michael Pryor, there is a fine. Any natural force is still your responsibility, including typhoons. From my understanding, the only way you can overstay your visa is by government mandate (quarantine, jail, etc). That being said, I have overstayed a visa by 2 days and didn't have to pay anything because there was a typhoon. Really, it is up ...


7

Penalties are levied via a fine. The fine ranges from around 1000 NTD (if you overstay by an hour) up to 10000 NTD. Source (page 5) http://iff.immigration.gov.tw/public/Data/11714474471.pdf


6

Star Cruises operates cruises in 2013 from Keelung, Taiwan to Naha and Ishigaki in Okinawa. Their website is astonishingly disorganized, slow and flaky, but a search for cruises in July 2013 from Keelung indicates that they operate the Keelung-Ishigaki-Keelung route almost weekly in summer, with departures on July 3, 10, 24 and 31, with two-night cruises ...


6

If I am reading multiple place on the Interwebs you may be out of luck. There were ferries running regular scheduled service from Taiwan to Okinawa but they apparently went bankrupt (OpenJourney confirms this as well). If one to believe Wikitravel there is an irregular service offered by Star Cruises but I can't confirm through their website this to be ...


5

China and Taiwan, even though China does not officially acknowledge Taiwan's existence, do allow citizens from each others' country to visit. Yes, they have to jump through hoops, but it's allowed. In fact from what I've heard during my travels in Taiwan, there's a lot of economic interdependence between the two countries now. I've also met travellers ...


5

Depends on the nationality of your passport but if its UK or American you should be fine (ie http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/asia/300230-any-problems-entering-china-w-taiwan-passport-stamp.html)


5

Knowing Kanji will help a bit in Chinese-using areas such as Taiwan, in that you may be able to get the general idea of some signs. That's about all. Don't expect anyone in Taiwan or Korea to understand spoken Japanese. You would be better off trying English.


5

The maximum stay for a 'visa-exempt' stay in Taiwan varies: it's either 30 days or 90 days, depending upon your nationality, so it is important to check which category you fall into. In case of Taiwan, the duration of stay is counted from day after arrival. Here's the relevant excerpt from the Taiwanese Bureau of Consular Affairs: The duration of stay ...


5

It's enough of a problem that someone's built an app for that. So one 'trick' would be to download the app, provided you have a capable smartphone. Where are toilets in Taiwan? This will require a GPS signal and data to function, but claims to cover over 60,000 public toilets in the country. The second trick you can take note of comes from the app ...


5

As a US passport holder, you're "visa-exempt" and will generally be granted 90 days on arrival, no questions asked: The nationals of the following countries are eligible for the visa exemption program, which permits a duration of stay up to 90 days: ... U.S.A. ... Now, making a quick visit to another country for the sole purpose of renewing your ...


5

According to Conscription in Taiwan: Draftable males classified as Overseas Taiwanese are exempt from the draft provided they do not reside continuously in the Taiwan Area for a) more than four months at a time for those born in 1984 and before or b) more than 183 days in a two-year period. There is a reference on that quote but it's now a dead link. ...


4

Most ex-pats who are in Taiwan leave the day before visa expiration. There is a lot of back and forth within the government about what means what. While one bureau will give you one awnser another will tell you a different answer. This advice was actually repeated to me by an employee at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. I have also had issues at immigration ...


4

EDIT: Just called up the Keelung port in Taiwan. The operator is closed. I heard they were supposed to resume operation but did not. Please ignore my previous post about the ferry being back up. I used to know a guy who would bring people from the Philippines up to Taiwan through Koahsuing. It is possible, but you need to be careful. A lot of the people ...


4

Typhoons are the Pacific equivalent of hurricanes, great big storms that only hit occasionally, almost always in the August-October typhoon season, and Taiwan gets an average of 3-4 per year. If a typhoon hits squarely where you happen to be staying, you can expect to be washed out for a couple of days, possibly even briefly stranded if you're out in the ...


4

It'll be when you pass through customs. For example, let's say there's an emergency, you get redirected to China for a couple of days, and then flown to Taiwan. They're not going to do it based on your scheduled flight. Indeed, immigration won't usually care what flight you were on or when it was 'meant' to get in - they care that right now, you're ...


4

Taipei to Keelung is effectively a suburban service, there are trains every 15-20 minutes and reservations are not required (or even possible for most trains?). And even for long-distance trains, advance reservations are generally not necessary, unless you're traveling at peak season (eg. Chinese New Year) or on some special train (eg. the Alishan Mountain ...


4

Generally speaking you lose every time you convert currency. If you can get the JPY into your card as JPY (it seems to depend on where you buy the card whether that's possible or not), then you're probably be best off using that. Travelex say they take a 5% or 5.5% (depending on the website) cut every time you do a currency conversion (that's their cut, ...


4

They're in geographic order. However, long Taiwanese roads are broken up into "sections" (段), each of which restarts the numbering. So if you look at these two addresses: #456, Xinyi Rd Sec. 4, Xinyi District, Taipei City #16, Xinyi Rd Sec. 5, Xinyi District, Taipei City "#16" (Sec. 5) is actually further away from the city center than "#456" (Sec. 4). ...


4

DaveP is right and it's probably the Stairway to Heaven, in Yushan National Park. However, I'd like to add an answer that is more generally and not only applicable to this one. There is a tool called TinEye that is a reverse image search tool. You upload an image or provide a link to an image and the search engines searches for similar pictures in the web. ...


3

Well I thought this was going to be a silly question and that Ishigaki's airport might not be international. But then some hunting revealed that there are in fact direct flights from Taipei to Ishigaki on TransAsia Airways. Picking a random date in August I found the price to be $8448.0 TWD, which comes to $308 AUD, much cheaper than any non-direct flights ...


3

So there turned out to be a rather pedestrian reason for my problem -- I was looking for seasonal April flights in November, so they weren't loaded into the system yet. But handily enough, this Japanese site shows future schedules as well, and a few months later, they show up normally in ITA Matrix etc. (At least the AE flights, that is; GE may not be ...


3

I'm guessing you didn't go to "Loving Hut"? It's one of the bigger vegan chains and they're known for their simulated meats that are also found in the frozen/health food stores. You're right that Taiwan is one of the leading places to find simulated meats. Only place in the world where you can find soy bacon that actually crisps up. EDIT: A list of ...


3

No, it seems like you're not missing much. US to Taiwan appears to be surprisingly expensive. I got 1264 euros on momondo.com, 1764 USD on Google's flight search and 1525 USD on matrix.itasoftware.com.


3

In all probability you'll be fine. Unless you are getting a direct hit from the eye of the typhoon, you'll only experience a day or two of heavy rain and some wind. If your in a big city and shopping/dinning, you wont notice much. If you do find yourself on course for a hit, Taiwan is big enough that you could move to another city and keep out of the way. ...



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