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16

You can, but the travel is a bit on the unconventional side. Most shipping companies will accept passengers at a relatively cheap rate and you can just tag along. I live in Manila, my father in law runs one such company, my brother in law is a cook for another. There are some caveats: You're surrounded by 'salty sailors', which may or may not be ...


14

Unfortunately in this case common sense trumps political pride: entering Taiwan is considered leaving China, and you'll thus need a multiple-entry visa to get back to the mainland. (Incidentally, the same applies to Hong Kong and Macau.) I'm having trouble finding an authoritative source, but this random Chinese visa agent (apparently banned here, replace ...


14

Safety wise, if an airline is allowed to land at an EU airport they are safe. That simple. They need to adhere to the EASA regulations for that. Also, they are in the IATA IOSA registry and the last time China Airlines had a fatal accident was in 2002 and the last time they had any accident was in 2007. Source: ...


12

TL;DR: You shouldn't. Taiwan is nowhere near as "bow-heavy" as Japan, but the same rule applies: foreigners are not expected to know or understand how to bow, and that's fine. Anybody meeting or being introduced to you is going to shake hands Western style. If you see people bowing at temples, funerals, whatever, what they're doing is none of your ...


12

I was in Taiwan in August. Very few problems in Taipei; there's usually someone around who can speak some English, and failing that, hand signals and waving and pointing goes a long way. In addition, many of the signs are in English as well. Even in the markets, you could point, or some friendly person would take you where you wanted to go. Probably in ...


12

The reason there is no US embassy in Taiwan is because the US does not recognise the Republic of China (the government of Taiwan) as the legitimate government of China - it recognises the People's Republic of China (mainland China). The offical US embassy site notes: *Taiwan Note: The U.S. maintains unofficial relations with the people of Taiwan through ...


11

Your visa will indicate how many times you are permitted to enter China under that visa. On the first line, there should be a field "ENTRIES" with a letter and a chinese character following it. If that letter is M, you are eligible for multiple entries. China also has single and double-entry visas; presumably, those would be the letters S and D respectively. ...


10

I don't think your Japanese will be much help, except for interacting with Japanese tourists. Where there are guides or directions in Japanese, there will almost certainly be guides or directions in English. Your kanji may help with Taiwanese signs or Korean newspaper headlines, but Japanese is not related to Mandarin and distantly if at all to Korean, aside ...


9

As mentioned by Michael Pryor, there is a fine. Any natural force is still your responsibility, including typhoons. From my understanding, the only way you can overstay your visa is by government mandate (quarantine, jail, etc). That being said, I have overstayed a visa by 2 days and didn't have to pay anything because there was a typhoon. Really, it is up ...


9

According to this Google search it is the 'Stairs (or Stairway) to Heaven' in Yushan National Park.


9

Yes you can. There are still some in Taipei. http://www.u2mtv.com/html/about/03.aspx is one of the chains. You can pick the movie you want from the shelf (they're all legit copies, btw), then check out and pick a room. You can also order food from them for you to enjoy. Just FYI, it's popular among teenagers because of the private suites... and you could ...


9

It's because China manages its air traffic by routing flights along relatively narrow air corridors. For a discussion, see https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/explained-flight-delays-china-todd-siena.


8

Penalties are levied via a fine. The fine ranges from around 1000 NTD (if you overstay by an hour) up to 10000 NTD. Source (page 5) http://iff.immigration.gov.tw/public/Data/11714474471.pdf


8

Eva Air is definitely a good carrier but they only serve Vienna, Paris, London and Amsterdam in Europe. Depending on where you are in Germany one of those may be an option. If you allow for a stopover there a literally 100s of options. Most of them seem to be considerably cheaper than China Airlines and you could consider spending on "Premium Economy" for ...


7

Star Cruises operates cruises in 2013 from Keelung, Taiwan to Naha and Ishigaki in Okinawa. Their website is astonishingly disorganized, slow and flaky, but a search for cruises in July 2013 from Keelung indicates that they operate the Keelung-Ishigaki-Keelung route almost weekly in summer, with departures on July 3, 10, 24 and 31, with two-night cruises ...


7

If I am reading multiple place on the Interwebs you may be out of luck. There were ferries running regular scheduled service from Taiwan to Okinawa but they apparently went bankrupt (OpenJourney confirms this as well). If one to believe Wikitravel there is an irregular service offered by Star Cruises but I can't confirm through their website this to be ...


7

It'll be when you pass through customs. For example, let's say there's an emergency, you get redirected to China for a couple of days, and then flown to Taiwan. They're not going to do it based on your scheduled flight. Indeed, immigration won't usually care what flight you were on or when it was 'meant' to get in - they care that right now, you're ...


7

TL;DR: You're probably fine. The big occasion for firecrackers in Taiwan (and the rest of the Chinese world) is Chinese (Lunar) New Year, which is traditionally celebrated at the stroke of midnight by, you guessed it, lots of deafeningly loud firecrackers. However, lunar new year is well after the Gregorian one and next falls on February 8, 2016, so you'll ...


6

The maximum stay for a 'visa-exempt' stay in Taiwan varies: it's either 30 days or 90 days, depending upon your nationality, so it is important to check which category you fall into. In case of Taiwan, the duration of stay is counted from day after arrival. Here's the relevant excerpt from the Taiwanese Bureau of Consular Affairs: The duration of stay ...


6

As a US passport holder, you're "visa-exempt" and will generally be granted 90 days on arrival, no questions asked: The nationals of the following countries are eligible for the visa exemption program, which permits a duration of stay up to 90 days: ... U.S.A. ... Now, making a quick visit to another country for the sole purpose of renewing your ...


6

Taiwan has almost no embassies left, having lost the battle with the PRC for recognition (with very few, mostly insignificant, exceptions). What are usually present are offices that provide consular services with names such as "Taipei Economic and Cultural Center". China (The People's Republic) has nothing to do with Republic of China (Taiwan) visas, so ...


6

It is very common in many parts of Asia and Africa for people to adopt Western names, especially English ones, and to use them even in local contexts. So in terms of travel, do not be suspicious if a stranger says he is Christopher or she is Emily. In some cases, it is simply can be one of many names someone adopts. In traditional Chinese culture, one can ...


6

I rode my bicycle around the whole of Taiwan. English is spoken a bit more in Taipei than other places, but it's hit-or-miss everywhere. I found a tea shop in Taipei where the staff did not understand "tea" or any other relevant words...but a helpful local next in line stepped up to translate. As with many places in the world, younger people (under 30) ...


6

Taiwan will have the same week long holiday as the mainland, officially starting on the 18th. The biggest days are the first two: the 18th is new year's eve and the 19th is the first day of the new year. Things will be very busy. People come home from afar to be with their families during the holiday, so the population density goes up significantly. Whether ...


6

According to official US information (https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/country/taiwan.html), the American Institute in Taipei performs "consular services similar to those at embassies". Your sister-in-law should be apply to apply for a US visa from there. Also, a transit visa is intended to be used for a "brief layover in the United States when ...


5

Knowing Kanji will help a bit in Chinese-using areas such as Taiwan, in that you may be able to get the general idea of some signs. That's about all. Don't expect anyone in Taiwan or Korea to understand spoken Japanese. You would be better off trying English.


5

China and Taiwan, even though China does not officially acknowledge Taiwan's existence, do allow citizens from each others' country to visit. Yes, they have to jump through hoops, but it's allowed. In fact from what I've heard during my travels in Taiwan, there's a lot of economic interdependence between the two countries now. I've also met travellers ...


5

Depends on the nationality of your passport but if its UK or American you should be fine (ie http://www.flyertalk.com/forum/asia/300230-any-problems-entering-china-w-taiwan-passport-stamp.html)


5

It's enough of a problem that someone's built an app for that. So one 'trick' would be to download the app, provided you have a capable smartphone. Where are toilets in Taiwan? This will require a GPS signal and data to function, but claims to cover over 60,000 public toilets in the country. The second trick you can take note of comes from the app ...


5

Taipei to Keelung is effectively a suburban service, there are trains every 15-20 minutes and reservations are not required (or even possible for most trains?). And even for long-distance trains, advance reservations are generally not necessary, unless you're traveling at peak season (eg. Chinese New Year) or on some special train (eg. the Alishan Mountain ...



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