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3

While the previous answers justify the reason for it not being there, you can find it. At least for ÖBB trains, head over to the Fahrplan (i.e. the Timetable). These can typically be found around the stations or on the platforms. You will find that every train, even the S-Bahn, has a unique Zug-Nummer (Train Number). Source (Ignore the yellow circle. It ...


3

If you know the type of the train, the departure time and the destination you can uniquely identify a train — I don't know of a single case where two trains to the same destination via different routes depart at the same time. In those cases, the platform is always shown in electronic journey planners (and often on your ticket). If the scheduled platform is ...


5

The railway structure both in terms of pricing and network is very different in the Alpine countries than in Germany. Broadly speaking in these countries, it's expected that passengers will not plan their journey based on price, but that they'll just show up when they want to travel and take the next appropriate train. While there is some tariff discretion ...


0

Yes you can. You'd be better off finding a bureau de change though. Bureaux de change will usually be able to do the card transaction in euros and as a general rule have better exchange rates than ATMs.


5

There are a couple of things you should do. Driving license An International driving licensed is not required, when your driving license is in a language that the police can read. They have to verify that you license is up to date an valid. So, when your driving license is in German, French, Italian, or English, you should be fine, and probably there are ...


4

Yes, you can. Maestro Cards work with every ATM in Switzerland. The currency of the card doesn't matter. The fees depends on the issuing institute (bank). ATMs of the Swiss Post (the yellow ones) charge an extra fee.


3

You don't require any additional visa, as Switzerland is a schengen country itself - while not a member of the EU, it is a part of Schengen (and several other EU-related agreements). If you wish to drive on a motorway/autoroute however, you will need a pass/sticker affixed to your car, called a Vignette. This can apparently be bought either online or at a ...


2

Switzerland is member of the Schengen area. So you don't need any extra visa to enter Switzerland.


0

Yes. It is safe to drink water in Swiss mountain huts. Huts are generally high in the mountains and the water comes straight from melting snow and ice or from springs. It may not bear the certificate of the Swiss authorities, but pretty much everybody who visits mountain huts drinks this water. Some do sell bottled water but you absolutely don't need to ...


16

Water regulations in Switzerland are very strict and most tap water is of impeccable quality. There is also a law which states that any fountain, which doesn't have regulated drinking water, has to be declared as such, so if you see a fountain with no sign on a village square, it's very likely safe to be drunk. This is most likely the reason why there is a ...


0

There are no Schengen wide regulations on how to react on visa violations and overstays. Each member state is free to set their own penalties and reactions. Overstays are usually settled with a fine, but in severe cases, you can also be banned from entering Schengen for a period of time. I can't find any current rates, but in 2011 Switzerland issued fines ...


1

You can maybe find some private bus company unless there are rules that ban this, it might be cheaper but will surely take longer and you risk getting stuck in traffic. yes, by using the mountain railways on the alps, but it costs a lot and they are pretty far off from Zürich so it would take a long time, not a good idea without any stops in the middle. ...


11

Lepido.ch is a French-language site dedicated to everything related to butterflies in Switzerland with a wealth of practical information. According to the site, some butterflies are protected in the whole country and some cantons add further restrictions on top of that. Bad news for would-be Nabokov followers is that Vaud (where Montreux is located) ...


3

You should travel by train. It's easy and comfortable. The train from Zurich to Lucerne takes 45 - 50 minutes. There are two departures per hour and it costs 25 CHF. The journey from Lucerne to Basel takes 1h00 - 1h15 and costs 33 CHF. There are also two departures per hour. There is no need to book in advance. Go to the station, buy your tickets and ...



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