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According to EGTRE, the single rail border crossing between Sweden and Finland carries freight only. Sweden and Finland use different track gauges, and freight is transshipped between Swedish and Finnish cars in Harparanda. The line across the border is dual-gauge, but according to EGTRE the standard-gauge track does not see regular use.


3

No, there are no passenger trains between Finland and Sweden. There is actually a train line crossing the border between Haparanda and Tornio, but it is currently (since 1988) only used by freight trains. Coming from Sweden, you could take a train to Luleå, from which you have to bridge about 160km on the bus to Kemi, where you will have access to the ...


11

It depends on what you consider 'special skills'. With some excercise, paddling should be feasible for most people. For the English Channel, you can easily find operators and boat charterers offering planning support or equipment rent: http://www.fullthrottleboatcharters.com/kayak-across-english-channel/ Crossing the Øresund may not be much more than 5km ...


9

As of July 2014, bicycles were not allowed on the Øresund Bridge. Check back in 55 years: It's currently forbidden to cycle across the Öresund bridge, a part-bridge, part-tunnel connection between Malmö and Copenhagen, which was made famous by the hit television show The Bridge. But if new proposals by Sweden-based construction company Skanska and ...


4

Yes, "Köpenhamn Ingerslevsgade DGI" is Copenhagen (and Göteborg is of course Gothenburg). Ingerslevsgade is where most long-distance buses from Copenhagen leave. It's near the central station, just around the corner from the outer end of the S-train platforms. There are frequent train services from the airport to the central station -- continue straight ...


2

There's a train leaving from the Copenhagen Airport terminal at 13:38 next Thursday and you can book direct to Gothenburg. Travel time is about 3 hours. Regarding the 'tips-and-tricks' part of your question... Alternatively, to take in some local culture, you can catch the train from Copenhagen to Helsingør and check out Kronborg Castle, the traditional ...


4

Swedish stores have no obligation to accept Euro or any other currency besides Swedish krona. The exchange rate at the stores/chains that accepts Euro is far from the best for you as a customer. Your probably best option is to withdraw local currency/pay directly with card (I see other answers already touched upon that). If you want to exchange some cash at ...


5

Not sure about Gothenburg, but I've been in Sweden many many times, so I can comment on the general issue. The local exchange offices in Sweden (I used the ones in Stockholm and Malmö) charge you a huge amount of commission/service fee. That's far above the standards of any country I've ever been to outside Northern Europe. Considering this, I would really ...


9

Although many businesses in Göteborg accept Euros in cash, the most convenient option is just to use your card for everything. Parts of the transport system don't accept cash anyway. It doesn't matter what currency your card holds; it will be converted to SEK when you make a transaction. Important to bear in mind: Although some businesses (mostly in ...


11

You won't be able to withdraw Euros easily. There could be a limited number of special-purpose ATM in larger banks but I have personally never seen one in Sweden and/or Denmark (I have seen some in Switzerland). Regular ATM won't offer Euros. What you should be able to do is withdraw Swedish Krona with your Euro-denominated card (or perhaps even directly ...



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