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No, both countries are in the Schengen area, you do not need separate visas for them. The one visa you should apply for must be valid though for the whole period of time you're planning to be in the Schengen zone. In case you're leaving the Schengen area and coming back during the trip, it has to be a multiple-entry visa. Give the whole itinerary with ...


3

Generally speaking consulates from Schengen countries can issue what they deemed appropriate, you can't apply for a “90 days visa” or a “30 days visa” or anything like that. So if you submitted an itinerary for a business trip with meetings spread over ten days, you might receive a visa covering only that and you can't expect to get some sort of standard ...


6

I crossed that border in both ways. A special case nobody cited is that there's another narrow gauge track that ends at Hendaye/Hendaia coming from San Sebastián/Donosti. That is served by Euskotren, the basque railway company. This line allows passengers to cross the border in both ways. People from the zone are used to this setup. As cited, that comes ...


1

We did the same a couple of years ago. We decided on the destination first, and then looked at dive centres. We used Wikivoyage and PADI to get a list of local dive shops, and then Tripadvisor to read reviews on the dive shops. In the end we had it narrowed down to three shops, and wrote them an email asking about their prices and services. We then chose ...


10

The two tracks allow Spanish trains to go to the French station and French trains to go to the Spanish station. From a technical standpoint, you could also imagine a single station in one country or the other where both networks meet. In fact, it's the setup used in Latour-de-Carol, also between France and Spain (with another peculiarity, namely a third ...


6

According to Railways Through Europe: Under the terms of a diplomatic agreement concluded on 8 April 1864 between the two countries, the arrangements for handling the traffic provide that the French passenger trains terminate in Irun and the Spanish ones terminate in Hendaye, returning empty across the border. Because of the difference in track gauge, ...


3

All the places you mentioned are in the Schengen area and the 90/180 rule applies to the area as a whole. So leaving for three months in the middle is not a small thing you could circumvent by being smart, it's a major condition of visa-free visits designed precisely to preclude what you want to do. Staying and working for a full 9 months in the Schengen ...



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