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15

The options are: Tourist visa in your home country (1-3 entries, 60+30 days on each entry) Documentation is not particularly difficult. Exact requirements vary depending on the consulate, but usually it's a 1-page application form, two photos, copy of confirmed flight itinerary and a recent bank statement showing some minimal balance ($1500 or so). Visa ...


11

Yes, it is possible to hire motorbikes in Bangkok and Chiang Mai. I haven't done this myself but some friends did. It costs about 200-800 baht per day to hire one depending on the type of motorcycle you get. It might make sense to buy one from an expat or a another traveller, then sell it when (if?) you go back to Thailand. You will definitely need to have ...


10

Many Thai people vacation in Malaysia, it's not too expensive for them and they still feel at home there. So just as @MastaBaba suggested I would also suggest Malaysia. Many areas are very similar to Thailand and communication is not too much of a problem. Oh and you might poke in to Singapore while you're there to really fill up the meter for your ...


10

Getting to Aranya Pratet via train or bus from Bangkok There are 2 trains that leave from Bangkok daily for this town; The first train is at 5:55am from Hualamphong and the second is at 13:05pm. The tickets cost 48 baht and are available only on the day of travel. The trains do tend to get delayed along the way, so unless you have plans to break up your ...


10

Take a look at http://www.claudiocorallo.com/ His story is amazing, and he is probably one of the best cacao producers in the world. They do the whole growing of cacao to sell and they produce their own chocolate also. I know of a friend that went to Claudios farm in S. Tome e Principe and they have a guided tour where they explain the whole process of ...


9

Many tourists wishing to stay in Thailand longer than 30 days given on the standard tourist visa (on incoming flights) do 'visa runs' to nearby countries. You are correct that overland entries only get a two-week visa instead of a month-long visa, but sometimes you need to evaluate what works out cheaper for you. You'll obviously be looking for the cheapest ...


9

I did feel that major cities in Vietnam (Ho Chi Minh, Ha Noi) felt touristy, but considerably less compared to Thailand. Bag-snatching is somewhat common in the nightlife areas in Ho Chi Minh City but otherwise I didn't feel unsafe in any cities I visited. While I haven't been there, Ha Long Bay is particularly well-known for its beauty and there are enough ...


9

The same page on Wikitravel as referenced in Zeocrash's answer continues: As of March 2007, travel beyond Kengtung to the rest of Myanmar is not possible, even with a valid tourist visa Kengtung is a town several hours by bus from the Thai border. We stayed there for a few days and then took a domestic flight to Inle Lake. You can also fly to ...


9

Bali (an island of Indonesia) is similar to Thailand in all aspects. Bali is cheap. 10 Euros are basically 124.000 Rupiah. Native usually spends only 20.000 Rupiah for their lunch/dinner. It means You can live and eat like a king. Incredible beaches Bali has a lot of beautiful beaches. Try to search for Nusa Dua/ Sanur beach in Google. Stay away from ...


9

How often do cameras get stolen? Every. Single. Day. You should always guard your camera, and any other valuables, as if they were expensive, and could walk off at any time because, well, they are expensive, and could walk off at any time. Certainly the degree to which you guard your belongings can be very region-dependent, but will generally be a lot more ...


9

The practical answers are Japan and South Korea, both ~6 hours away (plus connections) from Thailand, Korea being a smidgen closer. Both have very developed, mature ski facilities -- you may recall that Nagano, Japan hosted the 1998 Winter Olympics, and Pyeongchang, Korea will follow in 2018 -- that cater to all levels and needs. In Hokkaido, in ...


8

Like Jonik said, the WIFI usually only covers hotels, cafes and malls (shopping centres). In Singapore however, the coverage is bigger, you can get WIFI freely across the island using Wireless@SG. The registration and usage are free. However the bandwidth really depends on the location. In Malaysia / Indonesia, it would be better to buy a temporary 3G ...


8

I have never done such a trip, but you should have a look at train lines. I think the Transsiberian has a route linking Moscow to Beijing. Then, to progress further west, it depends on which European country you wish to reach. The Moscow-Berlin-Paris train leaves several times a week and takes 38 hours, including one night on board. A good website I ...


8

For Laos, Canadian citizens require a Single Entry visa, valid for up to 60 days. Cambodia you require a single entry visa, valid for 90 days. However, in both cases, while they're valid for 60 and 90 days respectively, this is just the period after application during which you enter, and you can only actually stay in each country for 30 days, or when ...


8

Well according to Wikitravel: The nearest Cambodian town is Stung Treng, and the border is a 90-minute speedboat or bus ride away. Note that the border is lightly used, with almost no onward public transport available at the border (therefore book through transport from Stung Treng to Ban Nakasang for Si Phan Don/Don Det) and both customs officers and ...


8

Ok, Since I travel to Sabah a lot, here is my take on your plan. Fly from KL to KK and make that your start/end point. Explore KK Town Check out the islands (Manukan and Sapi which are only 15 minutes from town) Explore Kinabalu National Park (2 hrs away from KK) Fly KK to Sandakan (45 mins) Explore Sandakan, filled with Eco Tourism. Places like Sepilok ...


8

I only have a partial answer. If you are in Europe and you lack the funds, a substitute for the sensation of chocolate and cacao can be found in the Chocolate museum (DE) in Cologne, Germany. They actually have a greenhouse with cacao trees. Although you will not be allowed to pick them. You can also go to Suriname. There is no commercial plantation ...


8

If you are really on the lookout for cacao and chocolate form start to finish, Chuao in Venezuela is the place to go. They do not have an official 'assist on the plantation' arrangement, but local life revolves around the process, and you will certainly be able to see every part of it, and taste the products at various stages. In my opinion, the BEST ...


7

it seems that it's very dificult to enter Burma by land, legally. As for illegally, well burmese prisons aren't particularly nice. Hopping across the Thai border into Myanmar's border towns is easy, but crossing into or out of Myanmar proper by land varies between difficult and impossible. Visa-free entry is possible at some border crossings, ...


7

To avoid your laptop from being stolen I would recommend to use a laptop locker (Kensington lock). I use it quite a lot and it is really comfortable. It looks like this: Basically you can avoid having someone who grabs your laptop and runs away. The cable is quite strong, it is not so easy to cut it off. If you're worried about your private data in your ...


7

I think to get from Saigon to Kampot, you have to go through Phnom Penh. The main roads and bus lines go that way. Even if there are more direct roads, I doubt they can be used by buses because of the condition of many bridges in the area. Usually you can always get a private taxi to take you anywhere, but I doubt you'll find someone in Saigon driving you ...


7

Since you consider Myanmar difficult, the best route would be: Malaysia, Thailand, Laos, China. There, avoiding Tibet and Qinghai completely, going through Yunnan, Chengdu, Xi'an, Lanzhou, Urumuqi, Kashgar and from there into Pakistan. The interesting part here is that you basically travel along the silk road, which is very interesting. I did that 2 years ...


7

This information is correct. Same if you apply for one in Hong Kong. To translate what this is: You need to own real estate in China OR be married to a Chinese person OR have received two single-entry visas before AND you have to be able to prove either of those. If you cannot, you will receive a single-entry visa to China only. Once you've used that, ...


7

According to laos-guide-999.com: If you don't have photos you will be asked to pay a small fee (few dollars) for scanning your photograph from your passport, and placing it onto your visa application form. Another opinion from wikitravel: passport photo is/may be required (although you may be able to pay a US$1 "fee" to have this requirement ...


7

The answer is going to depend on your exact itinerary, but my sneaky suspicion is that hubbing out of Kuala Lumpur and flying Air Asia everywhere would be the cheapest way to do it. Not only is Air Asia cheap and ubiquitous, but the passenger taxes & charges at KUL are noticeably lower than in SIN. That said, Kuala Lumpur's LCC terminal is a bit of a ...


7

Usually questions like these get closed as subjective, but in KL's case I think there's a pretty objective answer: The Petronas Towers! (courtesy me) Especially at night... (courtesy Someformofhuman, Wikimedia Commons) Sure, there are taller skyscrapers these days, but (IMHO) few are prettier, and nothing else in KL that you can cover in an hour comes ...


7

None. I have visited all those countries and I wasn't asked about insurance by any country (we have free medical care back in my home country but I think that's irrelevant). A note about your credit card's insurance: if you plan to use it, just make sure you are eligible for it before leaving the country. In most cases, you have to buy the ticket using that ...


6

Your first stop is The Man in Seat 61, a site dedicated to train travel around the world and getting there from England by train in particular. The focus is on train travel but overland alternatives (buses, boats, etc.) are mentioned when trains don't cut it. So read London to Thailand overland. Starting from Thailand, crossing Myanmar is pretty much ...


6

Well a good way is to look for a site which specializes in independent reviews. One such which specializes in accommodation and dining, is "tripadvisor". I wasn't sure if they also covered reviews of tours but just in case I Googled for tripadvisor thedragontour and indeed they do cover it: The Dragon Trip ... Ranked #15 of 39 tours in Shanghai Now ...


6

All you have to do is contact a travel agency to file the paperwork on your behalf several months before you plan to enter the country. If coming for business, the company you are visiting (or their attorney) can also file the paperwork for you. The program is designed to make it extremely easy to enter the country, and it has been working rather well. If ...



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