Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

20

That's a lot of questions, son, but I'll give you a general rundown based on my experience. English signage in the major cities is sufficient for getting around, eg. the Seoul Metro and Korea Rail have all major signs and announcements in English (and Japanese and Chinese!), so you won't need hangul for a visit of a few days. Major tourist attractions ...


15

You can also catch a glimpse of North Korea on the Jayu-ro highway, for instance around 37.802870, 126.683044. Nothing very interesting though, just some hills across the sea. The tour I took to DMZ (you can't get there without a tour) took us via that road, because it's one of the easiest places to see North Korea close to Seoul. According to our tour ...


11

Name: Inwangsan Suseong-dong Valley Address: 서울특별시 종로구 옥인동 185-3 185-3 Ogin-dong Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea Location: Google Maps Sources: TheSeoulStop.com, TheSoulOfSeoul.com The map is not too clear to determine the exact location of the bridge, this is as close as it gets.


10

The closest you can get on your own would be going to right before the DMZ. The North and the South each control 2km of the DMZ. Other than some special tour packages such as these, access to the DMZ is very controlled. You can see the North from several of the sites that are on the tourist packages.


9

If you have a British Citizen passport you can enter South Korea as a tourist for up to 90 days without a visa. Sources: Korean ministry of Foreign Affairs GOV.UK Wikipedia


9

I think jpatokal gave excellent advice - considering how much you asked! That's a lot of motivation for a mere tourist! May I add (I live in Korea): When you try to communicate in English, be patient: they may understand you, but they will need their time to respond to you if they are not very fluent. Have a pen and paper ready, or type on your ...


6

In a word (and a meme), no. As you're probably aware, South and North Korea remain (in theory anyway) at a state of war and travel between the two is extremely restricted. In the past, there were organized tours from South Korea to Kumgangsan and Kaesong, but both have been indefinitely suspended since 2008 or so. Pyongyang has never been accessible to ...


6

No, advance booking is not required, you can generally walk up and buy tickets. This applies to both the slow ferries and the hydrofoils on the primary routes (Busan-Fukuoka, Busan-Shimonoseki). Of course, this assumes there is availability on the ferries, but outside absolute peak travel seasons (Golden Week etc) this is unlikely to be a problem, ...


5

Take the Airport Railroad to Seoul Station and from there a "Mugunghwa" train to Daejeon. The "all stop" train (1 hour journey) from the airport to Seoul costs 3950 KRW. There is an express train doing the journey in 30 minutes. It costs 8000 KRW. http://english.arex.or.kr/jsp/eng/information/use_information.jsp The train from Seoul top Daejeon (journey ...


5

There are no direct connections between North Korea and either Japan or South Korea, but it is of course possible to visit North Korea starting in either of the two other countries. From Pyŏngyang, there are only direct flights to a handful of cities in China and Russia: Beijing, Shanghai, Shenyang and Vladivostok. In addition, there are international ...


5

i'm an undergraduate in Korea, (south of course!) sorry for my poor English in advance hope you understand what i mean let me help you out Quick answer for your question is "impossible" though you can find some people "acting" kisaeng (-_-?!) there are 2 types of kisaeng in korea nowadays real kisaeng They are who really worked(?) as kisaeng until 1940's ...


4

Both of them will be ok. However, on my opinion, I would prefer type C, because it has more flexibility in using. Also type C can be used in a lot of countries. If you travel a lot it's a big advantage. More information you may find here: http://www.iec.ch/worldplugs/typeC.htm


4

As a UK citizen you do not need a visa for Japan. The fact that you have a E2 Korean visa does not influence that at all.


4

Since Official Site of Korea Tourism Org.: Alien Registration: A Korean embassy or consulate can issue two types of visas: a short-term visa for visitors who want to stay up to 90 days and a special long-term visa for periods longer than 90 days. A visitor with a special long-term visa is required to apply for alien registration at a local immigration ...


4

Songnae is a suburb of Seoul. In addition to the random drinking holes you'll find around the station (and any station in Seoul), you've got a one-seat ride on subway line 1 to Yongsan, Seoul's largest foreigner-friendly nightlife district, and a single transfer to Hongdae/Sinchon, for the Korean and nightclub experiences.


4

In case the total amount of time you can spend there is more or less fixed, I would choose doing roughly two weeks Japan and one week Korea. My itinerary of suggestion would be as follows, though keep in mind that it's exactly the same if you do it in reverse order: Buy open-jaw tickets Zurich-Tokyo and Seoul-Zurich, you'll probably get a decent price with ...


4

I would recommend the Juwangsan National Park, where you can visit the Jusanji Pond. This is where Kim Ki-duk shot his famous movie Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring, hence on top of finding dark skies to watch the stars, you can enjoy the breath-taking atmosphere of the pond during day time.


4

Generally, the most popular tourist destination for beaches are located on East and South coast of Korea. With some minor exceptions, I'd avoid West coast in general because most of their beaches look like this: I know one of your primary concerns is proximity of the destination via public transportation, but what you must know is that Korea has one of ...


4

Bring whatever suits you best. If you live in the Euro area there is no point in converting Euros into Dollars to convert them later into Won. You will loose twice from the exchange. Euros can as easily be exchanged into Wons as Dollars can be. Buying Won in Europe can be cumbersome and is not worth the effort. Credit cards (MasterCard and Visa) are also ...


3

Fortunately there's a website for this! Lightpollutionmap.info visually shows you the most light polluted areas. Naturally it tends to be around cities. The area along roads east of Chech'on and Andong look to be your best bets, that I can see, but a bit of panning around the areas you're visiting, you may have a chance. A car is likely going to be ...


3

According to Timatic you may not need to if you don't depart back to Australia when arriving from Australia. Visa required, except for Holders of a visa issued by Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand or USA to nationals of Viet Nam, only if in transit through Korea (Rep.): For details, click here CLARIFICATION Visa Exemptions: ...


3

For your second question, no, there shouldn't be a problem in re-entering Japan. Even in the unlikely event that you are questioned, you have your ticket back to France to show that your goal is not to stay for another 90 days. It's better to ask one question per question, by the way...


3

Use the Irish one in and out of Ireland and the Korean one in and out of Korea. I'm a Dual US/UK Citizen. I always use my US passport for entering the US, but my UK passport everywhere else. If you're flying from Korea to Ireland and back, you'd use the Irish passport for the flight from Korea to Ireland and the Korean passport for the flight from Ireland ...


3

I don't have any first-hand experience with freighter travel but all the research I have done suggest it's mostly done through various agents. Trips from Europe to Asia are readily available but none from Romania that I could find. All the agencies sell more-or-less the same trips, on container ships from CMA-CGM, Hanjin or German shipping lines. Here are a ...


3

What you're asking about is called a visa run. Staying on back-to-back tourist visas is frowned on by many countries, and Immigration will probably start wondering if you're working illegally sooner or later, but anecdotal evidence says South Korea is not particularly picky and it's possible to stay for years this way. Your mileage may vary. However, it ...


3

Are you planning to sleep on the streets if the hotels are full :)? All jokes aside, second week of July is the peak season for tourists in Seoul. I'm not sure which part of Seoul you're planning to stay at, but for popular sites (Gangnam, Yeoeuido, Gangbuk), I assure you that the hotels will be booked by then. Yes, even with the MERS thing, unless if MERS ...


2

For its limited express and Shinkansen(bullet trains), JR waits to announce official typhoon-related cancellations until the morning of the day that particular train runs. I expect it will not be different with the Beetle ferry - at best a cancellation may be announced the prior evening. Weather services in Japan often advise "transportation-related ...


2

I looked at JR's English and Japanese-language web sites, but neither of them appears to have any weather alerts, nor even any section for weather information or cancellations. Your best bet for accurate information, then, is probably to call them (092-281-2315). That said, based on the weather prediction, I expect you're going to be cutting it very close. ...


2

I really enjoyed seeing Changdeok Palace (in Seoul) while I was there. I would definitely put that on the must-see list. I'm sure Gyeongbok Palace would also be great to see, but I didn't get to see it when I was there (I was only there on a 10 hour layover.) At least being from the U.S., it was also interesting just driving around the city and seeing ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible