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15

You can also catch a glimpse of North Korea on the Jayu-ro highway, for instance around 37.802870, 126.683044. Nothing very interesting though, just some hills across the sea. The tour I took to DMZ (you can't get there without a tour) took us via that road, because it's one of the easiest places to see North Korea close to Seoul. According to our tour ...


10

I'm an undergraduate in Korea (South). Quick answer for your question is "impossible" though you can find some people "acting" kisaeng (-_-?!) There are 2 types of kisaeng in korea nowadays Real kisaeng They are who really worked(?) as kisaeng until 1940's but not anymore since kisaeng has become illegal "job" (1945 I can't find the exact bill related at ...


10

The closest you can get on your own would be going to right before the DMZ. The North and the South each control 2km of the DMZ. Other than some special tour packages such as these, access to the DMZ is very controlled. You can see the North from several of the sites that are on the tourist packages.


8

Heineken Bar at Incheon Airport The Incheon Airport webpage mentions Heineken Bar, one in the East and one in the West side of the duty free area, both next to gate 4F. I don't know if they have draught beer, but the name looks promising. Below is a screenshot from the linked site: The Jet Lagged Lizard at Incheon A couple hundred metres outside of the ...


8

The concept of a "Type SE" seems to be a Japanese thing: the canonical list of plug types is maintained by the International Electrotechnical Commission, and they don't recognize it. The best source I could find, then, is this random Japanese site, which claims that Type SE is identical to the Type C, except that: Type SE plugs have may have a hole for a ...


7

South Korea is colder, although not hugely so: here's a handy Seoul vs Tokyo comparison chart. Summers are basically the same (sweltering), September-October is around 3°C colder, winters are up to 10°C colder. So I would tackle Korea first, then fly to Tokyo and work your way south. Note that in Japan itself there are significant regional ...


7

I'm not sure what exactly you are worried about, so let me point out a few points: There was an outbreak of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in South Korea earlier this year. According to the last update of WHO on the situation from July, there have been no new infections and there shouldn't be any danger of getting infected any more. You ...


7

It'd be helpful if you indicated which locations you plan to visit as the situation can vary depending on whether it is a popular tourist destination or not. But here's more or less a general answer: Unless if you plan to drive to a remote location with few population, booking a hotel won't be a problem since majority of hotels have employees that can speak ...


6

No, advance booking is not required, you can generally walk up and buy tickets. This applies to both the slow ferries and the hydrofoils on the primary routes (Busan-Fukuoka, Busan-Shimonoseki). Of course, this assumes there is availability on the ferries, but outside absolute peak travel seasons (Golden Week etc) this is unlikely to be a problem, ...


5

Two days ago I took the Weidong ferry from Qingdao to Incheon, while both the Lonely Planet book and the ferry company web site state 775 CNY as the cheapest fare (economy bed) plus 30 CNY port tax = 805 CNY, the actual ticket was just 458 + 30 = 488 CNY Both China and South Korea have National holidays soon, so I don't think this was an off-season price. ...


5

Take the Airport Railroad to Seoul Station and from there a "Mugunghwa" train to Daejeon. The "all stop" train (1 hour journey) from the airport to Seoul costs 3950 KRW. There is an express train doing the journey in 30 minutes. It costs 8000 KRW. http://english.arex.or.kr/jsp/eng/information/use_information.jsp The train from Seoul top Daejeon (journey ...


5

I saw a journey from Seattle to Pusan in 19 days and from Vancouver to Pusan in 14 days so that should give you a ballpark figure for the time it takes to cross the Pacific ocean nowadays (albeit in the other direction). Here are a few specific trips in the direction you asked about: Shanghai-Seattle in 17 days. Qingdao-Savannah through the Panama canal ...


4

In case the total amount of time you can spend there is more or less fixed, I would choose doing roughly two weeks Japan and one week Korea. My itinerary of suggestion would be as follows, though keep in mind that it's exactly the same if you do it in reverse order: Buy open-jaw tickets Zurich-Tokyo and Seoul-Zurich, you'll probably get a decent price with ...


4

Generally, the most popular tourist destination for beaches are located on East and South coast of Korea. With some minor exceptions, I'd avoid West coast in general because most of their beaches look like this: I know one of your primary concerns is proximity of the destination via public transportation, but what you must know is that Korea has one of ...


4

While I couldn't locate any permanent shops online, there's one event where you can certainly get a lantern: Seoul Lantern Festival. It's an annual festival held every November in Seoul. The official website lists prices for many different kinds of lanterns: Rectangular lanterns: KRW 15,000 / Hanji lantern (3 types): KRW 10,000 / Color lanterns: KRW ...


4

Bring whatever suits you best. If you live in the Euro area there is no point in converting Euros into Dollars to convert them later into Won. You will loose twice from the exchange. Euros can as easily be exchanged into Wons as Dollars can be. Buying Won in Europe can be cumbersome and is not worth the effort. Credit cards (MasterCard and Visa) are also ...


3

No. Australians are offered 3 months without a visa in South Korea. You being on a Chinese visa should hold no weight on your trip to South Korea. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visa_requirements_for_Australian_citizens#cite_note-118


3

Are you planning to sleep on the streets if the hotels are full :)? All jokes aside, second week of July is the peak season for tourists in Seoul. I'm not sure which part of Seoul you're planning to stay at, but for popular sites (Gangnam, Yeoeuido, Gangbuk), I assure you that the hotels will be booked by then. Yes, even with the MERS thing, unless if MERS ...


3

According to Timatic you may not need to if you don't depart back to Australia when arriving from Australia. Visa required, except for Holders of a visa issued by Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand or USA to nationals of Viet Nam, only if in transit through Korea (Rep.): For details, click here CLARIFICATION Visa Exemptions: ...


3

For your second question, no, there shouldn't be a problem in re-entering Japan. Even in the unlikely event that you are questioned, you have your ticket back to France to show that your goal is not to stay for another 90 days. It's better to ask one question per question, by the way...


2

I finally got to Qingdao which is one of several Chinese port cities that have ferries going to South Korea. I went to the ferry terminal in the morning and managed to get a ticket for the afternoon sail of the same day without a problem. That doesn't mean the ferry will never be fully booked, but from what I understood, that is not a very common case. ...


2

I really enjoyed seeing Changdeok Palace (in Seoul) while I was there. I would definitely put that on the must-see list. I'm sure Gyeongbok Palace would also be great to see, but I didn't get to see it when I was there (I was only there on a 10 hour layover.) At least being from the U.S., it was also interesting just driving around the city and seeing ...


2

I'm living in Korea and visited Japan several times. But it's not that much different. You commented you don't fly. So I think you can keep going your plan. I think it's not a huge challenging.


2

The standard in South Korea is 220V at 60 Hz. So you don't have to worry about a converter. Depending on where you are from you need an adapter. The answer to your second question depends on your needs and on the places you are going to. If you plan to stay in Seoul or in other metropolitan areas and you want to use internet based phone and message ...


2

It varies :-) Your approach may need work. This young lady is Korean (travelling in Malaysia). (Or you may be substantially younger than me and so appear more threatening :-) ). Collapsed tripod with camera at 90 degree pointing down legs used as train "selfie stick" - set timer to 2 seconds, adjust focus manually, press shutter release and swing camera ...


2

You can bring Dollars or Euros with you while visiting South Korea. You can also use master card in shopping in South Korea.


2

While I can answer this question as a native South Korean, this really is a question you should ask your country's relevant government office. As of June 15th, 2015, there are no known cases of MERS infection in Jeju Island. But as this is an on-going event, the situation can change at any minute. Most countries issued a level 1 travel advisory or ...


2

This question makes some assumptions that may be (are) erroneous. Carrying two laptops from the US and into South Korea, and then back to the US several months later isn't, or shouldn't be, of concern to either Customs or Border Protection of either the US or South Korea. In these days of online connectivity, many of us travel with multiple electronic ...


2

You may not require a visa since Korea has an exception for holders of a Canadian visa. Also, if you will remain airside, and any baggage is checked through to your final destination, then no visa will be required. Korea (Rep.) (KR) Visa Exemptions: Holders of a visa issued by Australia, Canada, Japan, New Zealand or USA to nationals of ...


1

Yup, at heiniken bar now. The only beer they sell is heiniken. They sell coffee and some food items. Well, it's called heineken bar.



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