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22

You have asked at the right place because I happen to have six brochures with me all about ferries between Japan and Korea and I've done this very trip six times and used most of the ferries at least once! User humphreyb has already told you all about the fast hydrofoil ferry, so I will concentrate on the other (overnight) ferries. Camellia Line Co., ...


20

That's a lot of questions, son, but I'll give you a general rundown based on my experience. English signage in the major cities is sufficient for getting around, eg. the Seoul Metro and Korea Rail have all major signs and announcements in English (and Japanese and Chinese!), so you won't need hangul for a visit of a few days. Major tourist attractions ...


18

You don't indicate what time of day you will arrive and depart, but Incheon Airport offers a series of free Transit Tours of varying lengths and departing at various times of the day. The shorter tours are within the city of Incheon, which is a major city in its own right, whereas the 5-hour tours are of sights and sites in Seoul. While such bus tours are ...


17

They are almost certainly Buddhist monks - the shaved head and gray clothes (apparently called "gasa") are a mark of their ascetic style of living. The gray robes worn by a monastic declare that one is a practitioner, and represent the spirit of no belongings, letting go of all worldly desires.


16

He is Buddist. Buddists in Korea wear grey and red robes, despite of the most asian countries where the popular color is yellow and orange.


15

You can also catch a glimpse of North Korea on the Jayu-ro highway, for instance around 37.802870, 126.683044. Nothing very interesting though, just some hills across the sea. The tour I took to DMZ (you can't get there without a tour) took us via that road, because it's one of the easiest places to see North Korea close to Seoul. According to our tour ...


11

Jeju is actually a very mainstream destination for Koreans, if not so well known to westerners. It is very developed for tourism and until recently when Korea started to become a wealthy country it was the de facto destination for honeymooners. You might think of it as Korea's equivalent of Australia's Gold Coast or USA's Hawaii. For Korea it's far south, ...


11

Name: Inwangsan Suseong-dong Valley Address: 서울특별시 종로구 옥인동 185-3 185-3 Ogin-dong Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea Location: Google Maps Sources: TheSeoulStop.com, TheSoulOfSeoul.com The map is not too clear to determine the exact location of the bridge, this is as close as it gets.


10

I don't think your Japanese will be much help, except for interacting with Japanese tourists. Where there are guides or directions in Japanese, there will almost certainly be guides or directions in English. Your kanji may help with Taiwanese signs or Korean newspaper headlines, but Japanese is not related to Mandarin and distantly if at all to Korean, aside ...


10

Have you tried to visit Jjimjilbang? I seldom go to a public bath, and sometimes I can see a man with tattoo. I think most of Jjimjilbangs will not block you to use it. I am able to say this because I assumed that it will be a small tattoos (i.e. on arms or on neck back.) But with a big tattoo like covered whole your back?.. Let's think about it. I saw your ...


10

The closest you can get on your own would be going to right before the DMZ. The North and the South each control 2km of the DMZ. Other than some special tour packages such as these, access to the DMZ is very controlled. You can see the North from several of the sites that are on the tourist packages.


9

Specific to defectors, not really. I think that would aggravate things more then anything. While South Koreans are aware of the "struggle" of many of their Northern brethren, things like the Ministry of Unification look actively to bond both cultures rather then highlight the differences. If you're looking for a glimpse of North Korean life you might want ...


9

I think jpatokal gave excellent advice - considering how much you asked! That's a lot of motivation for a mere tourist! May I add (I live in Korea): When you try to communicate in English, be patient: they may understand you, but they will need their time to respond to you if they are not very fluent. Have a pen and paper ready, or type on your ...


8

You can get a Hydrofoil between Fukuoka and Busan. It costs 13 000 yen per adult one way and takes about three hours. A few leave each day but you will need to book ahead. You book online and when you check in you'll need to show the credit card you used to pay for it, or some other proof of purchase. There is also a 1 500 yen 'fuel surcharge' payment when ...


8

Historically Seoul has had a number of issues with drinking water. Most recently the issue wasn't the water itself, but the pipes that delivered it, which many people claimed introduced contaminates. I can still remember being told by someone I was working with there about 10 years ago that the water was safe to drink in my hotel, but not in their office ...


8

I hope these links from the official Korea Tourism Organisation website, visitkorea, will help you: Muslim Food Guide Religious concerns / Halal Restaurants in Korea


8

He's a buddhist monk. If he speaks english, say hello and offer to buy him his dinner (don't worry, its not demeaning, buddhist monks live on the kindness of strangers by vow) and you'll get a fascinating conversation, and maybe even a bit of enlightenment!


8

If you have a British Citizen passport you can enter South Korea as a tourist for up to 90 days without a visa. Sources: Korean ministry of Foreign Affairs GOV.UK Wikipedia


7

WorldWide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) is the only way I know of to stay for free somewhere other than couch surfing. This might be what the Romanian you met used. I'm not familiar with Korea's program specifically, and all WWOOF farms vary depending on the host, but they may be able to help you arrange free accommodations and meals in exchange for ...


7

You're not going to "offend" anybody by giving them an unwrapped gift, but careful packaging will definitely increase the gift's perceived value and the brownie points you get for giving it, and yes, this extends to "just" snacks. Quick primer: http://www.korea4expats.com/article-gift-giving.html If you're staying in a hotel, reception can probably wrap ...


7

Here are 2 sample companies organizing these trips as a group tour: Koridoor Panmunjom There are several different places to see, such as the DMZ with its fences, some tunnels and the border crossings of course. Because of the many different combination of locations that you can see in a half-day or full-day course, the prices also vary a lot, between ...


6

According to TIMATIC (the Visa processing system use by most airlines/travel agents since 1963) the requirements for an Australia citizen visiting South Korea are : Passport required. Passport and/or passport replacing documents must be valid on arrival. Visa required, except for Those traveling to attend conferences, exhibitions, ...


6

It is indeed difficult to find information about this if you can't read Japanese or Korean. Most ferries are passengers only. I ended up asking a friend in Japan: There is at least one car ferry between Busan (Korea) and Fukuoka (Japan) run by KoreaFerry. The information I got says that the cheapest room category is included in the car price, but for the ...


6

There is a well-established system of organized crime in Korea. Korean organized crime operates in secret and many dislike being considered a gang and would rather be called a business, an organization, a clan, etc. similar to the few Tongs in china that are behind the organized crime and give direction and finance the various triads. The Korean mob was once ...


6

If you are in Suwon, the very first thing you should do is to try suwon galbi. Suwon is one of the best places in South Korea to try galbi. Also, don't forget to visit Hwasong, a fortress which was built after imjin japanse invasion. There is also a famous amusement park in Korea near suwon called, 'everland'. Plan on spending about 2-3 days to look around ...


6

There are a number of ferries between South Korea and China, via Tianjin or Qingdao. Both South Korea and China have a well-connected railway network, so it shouldn't be a problem to travel onward by train from the arrival point in China to Hong Kong. For what it's worth, the same page also lists ferries between South Korea and Japan. South Korea to Hong ...


6

Unfortunately, I do not have a positive answer to this question. I have been looking around the web for a few days now and I am almost sure there is no such museum. I have been through the list of museums in South Korea with the help of Google Translate but with no luck. There is not even one comment about such a museum in any website. I think I can safely ...


6

I think there is explanation of your question http://guidetokorea.wordpress.com/2011/11/15/air-raid-sirens-in-seoul-no-cause-for-alarm/ the siren will most likely only ever be a test out here. Check the time if you do hear it. 11am or 2pm on the dot are generally the test times. The siren will last 2-3 minutes then stop.


6

Rome2rio presents some possible routings, which go via Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur or Hong Kong (1st stop) and Japan (2nd stop). Any of these would be a good choice for you, since none of these countries require visas for a same-day, same-airport transfer. Going via the mainland US makes no sense, it's a long detour in the wrong direction.


6

I don't think you'd have much time- it's about one hour to downtown by train (they say 43 minutes, but they run 10-20 minutes apart), and of course you'd have to transit customs and immigration both ways, as well as security. Here is the train schedule.



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