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23

You have asked at the right place because I happen to have six brochures with me all about ferries between Japan and Korea and I've done this very trip six times and used most of the ferries at least once! User humphreyb has already told you all about the fast hydrofoil ferry, so I will concentrate on the other (overnight) ferries. Camellia Line Co., ...


22

You don't indicate what time of day you will arrive and depart, but Incheon Airport offers a series of free Transit Tours of varying lengths and departing at various times of the day. The shorter tours are within the city of Incheon, which is a major city in its own right, whereas the 5-hour tours are of sights and sites in Seoul. While such bus tours are ...


20

That's a lot of questions, son, but I'll give you a general rundown based on my experience. English signage in the major cities is sufficient for getting around, eg. the Seoul Metro and Korea Rail have all major signs and announcements in English (and Japanese and Chinese!), so you won't need hangul for a visit of a few days. Major tourist attractions ...


18

They are almost certainly Buddhist monks - the shaved head and gray clothes (apparently called "gasa") are a mark of their ascetic style of living. The gray robes worn by a monastic declare that one is a practitioner, and represent the spirit of no belongings, letting go of all worldly desires.


16

He is Buddist. Buddists in Korea wear grey and red robes, despite of the most asian countries where the popular color is yellow and orange.


15

You can also catch a glimpse of North Korea on the Jayu-ro highway, for instance around 37.802870, 126.683044. Nothing very interesting though, just some hills across the sea. The tour I took to DMZ (you can't get there without a tour) took us via that road, because it's one of the easiest places to see North Korea close to Seoul. According to our tour ...


12

Blossom viewing is common to all East Asian cultures, and the cherry blossom is the most prominent spring blossom in Korea. I would not say it is central to the culture the way it is in Japan, however. As with everything in East Asia, it is not untouched by complicated history. Some of the more famous stands, such as at Changgyeonggung Palace in Seoul, were ...


11

Jeju is actually a very mainstream destination for Koreans, if not so well known to westerners. It is very developed for tourism and until recently when Korea started to become a wealthy country it was the de facto destination for honeymooners. You might think of it as Korea's equivalent of Australia's Gold Coast or USA's Hawaii. For Korea it's far south, ...


11

Name: Inwangsan Suseong-dong Valley Address: 서울특별시 종로구 옥인동 185-3 185-3 Ogin-dong Jongno-gu, Seoul, Korea Location: Google Maps Sources: TheSeoulStop.com, TheSoulOfSeoul.com The map is not too clear to determine the exact location of the bridge, this is as close as it gets.


10

I don't think your Japanese will be much help, except for interacting with Japanese tourists. Where there are guides or directions in Japanese, there will almost certainly be guides or directions in English. Your kanji may help with Taiwanese signs or Korean newspaper headlines, but Japanese is not related to Mandarin and distantly if at all to Korean, aside ...


10

Have you tried to visit Jjimjilbang? I seldom go to a public bath, and sometimes I can see a man with tattoo. I think most of Jjimjilbangs will not block you to use it. I am able to say this because I assumed that it will be a small tattoos (i.e. on arms or on neck back.) But with a big tattoo like covered whole your back?.. Let's think about it. I saw your ...


10

The closest you can get on your own would be going to right before the DMZ. The North and the South each control 2km of the DMZ. Other than some special tour packages such as these, access to the DMZ is very controlled. You can see the North from several of the sites that are on the tourist packages.


10

I'm an undergraduate in Korea (South). Quick answer for your question is "impossible" though you can find some people "acting" kisaeng (-_-?!) There are 2 types of kisaeng in korea nowadays Real kisaeng They are who really worked(?) as kisaeng until 1940's but not anymore since kisaeng has become illegal "job" (1945 I can't find the exact bill related at ...


9

You're not going to "offend" anybody by giving them an unwrapped gift, but careful packaging will definitely increase the gift's perceived value and the brownie points you get for giving it, and yes, this extends to "just" snacks. Quick primer: http://www.korea4expats.com/article-gift-giving.html If you're staying in a hotel, reception can probably wrap ...


9

Historically Seoul has had a number of issues with drinking water. Most recently the issue wasn't the water itself, but the pipes that delivered it, which many people claimed introduced contaminates. I can still remember being told by someone I was working with there about 10 years ago that the water was safe to drink in my hotel, but not in their office ...


9

Specific to defectors, not really. I think that would aggravate things more then anything. While South Koreans are aware of the "struggle" of many of their Northern brethren, things like the Ministry of Unification look actively to bond both cultures rather then highlight the differences. If you're looking for a glimpse of North Korean life you might want ...


9

If you have a British Citizen passport you can enter South Korea as a tourist for up to 90 days without a visa. Sources: Korean ministry of Foreign Affairs GOV.UK Wikipedia


9

I think jpatokal gave excellent advice - considering how much you asked! That's a lot of motivation for a mere tourist! May I add (I live in Korea): When you try to communicate in English, be patient: they may understand you, but they will need their time to respond to you if they are not very fluent. Have a pen and paper ready, or type on your ...


8

WorldWide Opportunities on Organic Farms (WWOOF) is the only way I know of to stay for free somewhere other than couch surfing. This might be what the Romanian you met used. I'm not familiar with Korea's program specifically, and all WWOOF farms vary depending on the host, but they may be able to help you arrange free accommodations and meals in exchange for ...


8

You can get a Hydrofoil between Fukuoka and Busan. It costs 13 000 yen per adult one way and takes about three hours. A few leave each day but you will need to book ahead. You book online and when you check in you'll need to show the credit card you used to pay for it, or some other proof of purchase. There is also a 1 500 yen 'fuel surcharge' payment when ...


8

I hope these links from the official Korea Tourism Organisation website, visitkorea, will help you: Muslim Food Guide Religious concerns / Halal Restaurants in Korea


8

He's a buddhist monk. If he speaks english, say hello and offer to buy him his dinner (don't worry, its not demeaning, buddhist monks live on the kindness of strangers by vow) and you'll get a fascinating conversation, and maybe even a bit of enlightenment!


8

Heineken Bar at Incheon Airport The Incheon Airport webpage mentions Heineken Bar, one in the East and one in the West side of the duty free area, both next to gate 4F. I don't know if they have draught beer, but the name looks promising. Below is a screenshot from the linked site: The Jet Lagged Lizard at Incheon A couple hundred metres outside of the ...


8

The concept of a "Type SE" seems to be a Japanese thing: the canonical list of plug types is maintained by the International Electrotechnical Commission, and they don't recognize it. The best source I could find, then, is this random Japanese site, which claims that Type SE is identical to the Type C, except that: Type SE plugs have may have a hole for a ...


7

Australian Citizens do not require a visa when entering South Korea as a tourist. As of June 2014, Australian citizens no longer require a visa when entering for business purposes. A good source for visa requirements is the Star Alliance Website. For South Korea you will need to select "Korea (Rep. of)"


7

Here are 2 sample companies organizing these trips as a group tour: Koridoor Panmunjom There are several different places to see, such as the DMZ with its fences, some tunnels and the border crossings of course. Because of the many different combination of locations that you can see in a half-day or full-day course, the prices also vary a lot, between ...


7

I completed my travel. I can confirm that the shower rooms are completely self contained. You can leave your luggage at the front desk or carry it with you inside. The shower rooms look exactly like the pictures. The towels are small in size and you need to ask for multiple ones for an adult. It doesn't cost anything even for the "amenities". The only thing ...


7

South Korea is colder, although not hugely so: here's a handy Seoul vs Tokyo comparison chart. Summers are basically the same (sweltering), September-October is around 3°C colder, winters are up to 10°C colder. So I would tackle Korea first, then fly to Tokyo and work your way south. Note that in Japan itself there are significant regional ...


7

I'm not sure what exactly you are worried about, so let me point out a few points: There was an outbreak of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus in South Korea earlier this year. According to the last update of WHO on the situation from July, there have been no new infections and there shouldn't be any danger of getting infected any more. You ...


7

It'd be helpful if you indicated which locations you plan to visit as the situation can vary depending on whether it is a popular tourist destination or not. But here's more or less a general answer: Unless if you plan to drive to a remote location with few population, booking a hotel won't be a problem since majority of hotels have employees that can speak ...



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