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19

Malaria is transmitted by a specific type of mosquito (female anopheles) that breeds in still / stagnant water that collects after monsoons. If you're travelling during winter or summer in India, you don't have to worry about this too much as the weather conditions are not conducive for these specific mosquitoes to breed. Locals usually don't take malaria ...


14

I was in Southern India earlier this year and noticed many Indians speaking English with each other. This is because they simply don't speak each others native language. I don't think people in the south don't want to speak in Hindi, they simply can't. That's why English is so important, because most people speak better English than any second Indian ...


11

The "North vs South" divide exists. South Indians feel North Indians are loud, boorish, and have a superiority complex, and do not attempt to learn or respect local culture, language and such. North Indians feel South Indians are unfriendly, are sambar-rasam people. Both parties have some pre-conceived notions. In the end it depends on you, and the person(s)...


9

Most government health organizations recommend that chemoprophylaxis when traveling to an area where malaria is endemic (which includes South India). However, you should do whatever makes you comfortable - ideally after discussing it with a travel doctor. When I was in Delhi, it was primarily during winter and my travel doctor told me that for that area at ...


6

Depends on where you are planning to go, and when. If you are travelling to cities, you should be safe. In most urban areas, people are at a very low risk due to Malaria. Most cities have some kind of mosquito-control programme. If you are travelling to the hills, forests, natural reserves, and especially during the monsoons, which is when mosquitoes breed ...


5

Many travellers I know (who went to Africa) do not use profylactic antimalarials (like Lariam) because of the harsh side effects. They have some medicine to take AFTER the get malaria, and usualy travel in dry season only. Moreover, I heard that you can use herbal tea from (I guess) Artemisia annua as a prevention! If you hate to use chemical repellents ...


5

in kanyakumari, if you want to see the normal places like Vivekananda memorial etc, ferry services are available from morning 8 to evening 5 but depends on low tide/high tide and timing changes. For your personal seeing in the seas, there are very few options there and you need to negotiate everything else from timings to fare etc generally. Last time, I ...


4

India is vast and it is not possible to visit every part. And every corner in India has its own culture.Its a very diverse country and so its called "Unity in Diversity!" You might need years to just experience it. But if you have limited time this should help] 1) Southern India - Land in Mumbai enjoy couple of days here (Ajanta and Ellora Caves don't ...


4

For me the time is of importance - the whole tourist industry is based on this. There are three ways I think of India when 'partitioning' it: The first would be by the parts that are affected by the monsoon season (there are two main ones in India) and according to the time of your visit. The next "division" I would make would be: Northwest, Northeast, ...


4

As far as South India is considered, the no of people speaking hindi is different from one state to other. For example, one can survive with hindi in most northern parts of the two states Andhra and Karnataka. If you come down, not all people speak hindi, but if you try, you can atleast find one or two who are speaking hindi. This is true only in Andhra and ...


3

I agree with @DumbCoder. The surfing season ends in May as the monsoon starts in June. Lifeguards even prevent you from getting into the sea in June and July. Snorkelling in the lakes may also be a disappointment as the rains cloud the water and visibility is very low. The East Coast of Sri Lanka is a bright spot though and places like Arugambay are great ...


3

Not without getting a ticket to cover your journey. In food terms, it'd be like paying for 6 meals and just taking the 7th. It's not allowed. Similarly, if your ticket is valid from A to B, continuing on to C is NOT on the ticket's terms. You might get away with it if you stayed on, and played dumb ("oh I fell asleep and missed my stop") but if there's ...


3

There are two options for you - Via Kolar & Chittor which is shorter by 30KMs but slower due to two lane roads and no toll. Via Krishnagiri & Vellore, quicker but one need to pay toll. There are 5 toll booths between Bangalore and Chennai via Krishnagiri. Toll keeps varying as the toll operators keep changing the toll every 4-6 months.


2

I advise against taking anything. The side-effects can be harsh, in fact I wasn't able to enjoy my trip until I got rid of the medication. Furthermore, especially in India, you're traveling from city to city so the chances for a malaria mosquito finding you are really low. You're much more likely to be hit by a car, suffer from too much heat or get an ...


1

I have lived in a town the middle of South India for years. There are hundreds of foreigners living in my town. There are also thousands visiting each year. I've never heard of anyone taking malaria pills. Nor have I heard of even a single case of Malaria in this area. This is just some personal experience.


1

Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease transmitted by mosquitoes. The risks to health whilst travelling will vary between individuals and many issues need to be taken into account, e.g. activities abroad, length of stay and general health of the traveller. So it is recommended that you consult with your General Practitioner or Practice Nurse 6-8 ...



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