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9

It's a valid question (assuming your interest is genuine). South African nationals were non-visa nationals up to 2012, meaning they could arrive and seek leave to enter just like Australians, Canadians, and so on. But starting in about 2006, the Home Office determined that there were grave performance issues and asked Parliament to add South Africa to the ...


8

No. Wikipedia has a page on rail transport in Central America with an overview of the situation in each country. The Man in Seat 61 also has a page about Central and South America (though it does look somewhat incomplete, at least for South America). Overall, each country has, or doesn't have, its own network. There is currently no railway crossing any ...


8

To the best of my knowledge it's not. The passenger train service in Mexico doesn't seem to have long distance trains and in the United States you can get to the Mexican border is El Paso or San Diego but you never actually cross it in a train. So your trip is going to be cut short long before you get to the Darien Gap.


4

Besides more global solutions like http://www.onesimcard.com, there are no 'local' sim cards for multiple South American countries, comparable to Africa's Airtel. On top of that, South American cellphone networks tend to be somewhat fractured, meaning that out-of-the-way locations might only be served by one, or a few, of the nation's networks. So, with a ...


3

Ferry service has been discontinued from Chaguaramas (Trinidad) to Guiria (Venezuela) as of June 1st 2014... http://www.pier1tt.com/index.php/ferry http://www.guardian.co.tt/news/2014-05-23/ferry-service-venezuela-will-end-june-1


2

$2000 is not enough to buy a van that you could rely on for a long trip. Are you a mechanic? Registering it might be a problem: you probably have to be a resident of the state. On the other hand, if the van has plates, you can just drive it on those plates and sell it to used-car place when you are done. American insurance is only good in the US and ...


2

It depends on your friend, but I prefer useful gifts, specially before a long trip where any extra weight might be a problem. Does your friend have all the gear he'll need for the trip? I found this question on Bicycles SE about gear for a long bike trip. You could check if he's got all the needed resources and give him any he might have forgotten. Another ...


2

Indeed, that is a solution recommended by the hostel "Casa Tranquilo". There is this intersection called "La Irma", named after the gas station at the crossing of route 1 (between Puntarenas and Liberia) and route 145 (leading to Tilaran). As written in the timetables linked by the hostel and the one from the tourism board @pnuts found, there are buses ...


2

Aside from the onesim mentioned above, there is no carrier I am aware of in South America which covers all of those places without incurring roaming charges. Movistar is in all of those places, Claro may be as well, but when you register for the SIM, you incur roaming charges once you move to the next country. A few years ago, getting a SIM in each country ...


2

I live in Bolivia. Yes there is always a risk when it comes to carrying around expensive camera equipment. There are risks in other countries as in the United States etc etc. Some good ideas are: Consider buying an older, used DSLR and leaving your nice one at home. Use a camera bag that doesn't scream "photographer." Be careful where you leave ...


2

OOPS, a bit of humor from above!! Someone slipped a digit, or two, here. The Ferry isn't U.S.$2,000+. It's closer to U.S.$200. round trip. (The poster confused TT$ with U.S.$, or slipped a digit in her conversions.) Or the prices have dropped ~90% in a year.....not!!


1

I've been to Bolivia twice and there are many photo opportunities in the country. I've only taken inexpensive cameras I could carry out of sight in my pants front pocket because of the possibility of theft. Keep your valuables with you at all times and secure. You are more vulnerable as a foreigner but even native Bolivians are not entirely safe. I have ...


1

I've used http://www.onesimcard.com/ in Mexico (supposedly it works in more than 200 countries), but I can't recommend it 100%. It can be difficult to use, and the calls and SMSes often failed. But of course it's better than nothing! I would recommend getting OneSimCard as a backup, but then trying to pick up a cheap SIM card in each country as a primary ...



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