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17

Besides marinas there are several websites/forums you can search: Sailnet Cruisers Forum There are also “professional” websites that list ads like: Crew Seekers Find a crew Some of the websites require that you pay a fee. Anyway, as I commented before you may be required to have skills. Nevertheless make sure that the crew (and the captain) are also ...


9

The safest approach to arrive in any city is to arrange for your hotel to pick up you, meaning there will be a guy with a sign with your name on it waiting for you right outside Customs. Just give them a ring and ask about "airport transfer" or "airport shuttle service". The obvious downside is that this is usually expensive, often 2-4x the cost of a taxi. ...


8

First the general route to get to Europe over South America with sails: You start at the East or North Coast, move over the West Indies, go north to the USA, move northeast with the Gulf Stream and if you get far enough to the north, you have wind from the west and you can cross the Atlantic. Now you are in Chile and this is really the absolutely worst ...


8

Disclaimer: I have no real experience in crossing the atlantic, what follows is an educated guess. . Looking at the map for ocean currents, I think that finding a sailing boat heading for Europe in southern-South America will be quite difficult. [source: wikimedia As a sailor it would only make sense to follow the currents, which means that crossing from ...


4

I live here in Bolivia (Tarija). First of all you should never fly into La Paz. Santa Cruz is the better option as they are less likely to steal your stuff when you go through customs. As far as staying in the airport, if you are not waiting for a layover then by all means take a taxi to your hotel. I would suggest that you have your hotel pick you up as ...


2

I can only agree with some of the others here. Sailing south of South America is a very demanding route. I've been in Antarctica with my own boat and are now heading back from Uruguay/Buenos Aires. I'm looking for crew and I get some proposals. Mostly from people with just that 'a bit romantic' touch: I have no experience and no money, but I work hard' ...


2

My general strategy for safety in situations like this is not to look like an easy victim. In particular: Know the general route and driving distance to your hotel from the airport. If Google Maps has driving directions in the city you're travelling to, use it. If the driver deviates from it (GPS on your phone can be useful here) immediately say "Hey this ...


2

I hope someone with direct experience can give you some information. After a quick google, I'd say that I'd feel somewhat comfortable (as a guy) taking a reputable-looking cab from the airport directly to a hotel at 3:30am or whenever your flight lands and you get your stuff. I have a pretty good sense for who to trust and have avoided being robbed a ...


2

Ferry service has been discontinued from Chaguaramas (Trinidad) to Guiria (Venezuela) as of June 1st 2014... http://www.pier1tt.com/index.php/ferry http://www.guardian.co.tt/news/2014-05-23/ferry-service-venezuela-will-end-june-1


2

Aside from the onesim mentioned above, there is no carrier I am aware of in South America which covers all of those places without incurring roaming charges. Movistar is in all of those places, Claro may be as well, but when you register for the SIM, you incur roaming charges once you move to the next country. A few years ago, getting a SIM in each country ...


1

I've used http://www.onesimcard.com/ in Mexico (supposedly it works in more than 200 countries), but I can't recommend it 100%. It can be difficult to use, and the calls and SMSes often failed. But of course it's better than nothing! I would recommend getting OneSimCard as a backup, but then trying to pick up a cheap SIM card in each country as a primary ...



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