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13

Great question! As it has been already mentioned in the comments. There is no such thing as a "European" protocol. Look at kissing. In the Netherlands people tend to kiss three times. In Belgium it is one kiss on greeting. In Sweden hugging is the way to go, when meeting people. Kissing is considered more intimate. In France people kiss either 2 or 4 ...


12

I am French and I never thought of which cheek should be first kissed! I don't think there is a definite rule. The protocol I identified is: first protagonist tends his or her cheek (left or right) second protagonist adapts and tends the same cheek. if it fails, both smile or laugh and the procedure starts again As for the number of kisses, when people ...


9

I spent some months in Southern India last year and compared with some other parts of the world it was indeed a bit harder to meet other travellers. I haven't been to the North of the country yet but I assume it is similar. Some of the best places to meet people is in your dorm room or the hostel kitchen. India doesn't really have that many hostels or a ...


8

I've moved countries a lot, doing contracts. One of the finest resources that I've found is meetup.com You sign up, give your city, and your interests, and it starts suggesting social groups and events for you! I've used it to meet people and try new things when I lived in Vancouver, and now here in Melbourne, Australia. We can't tell you what to do ...


8

Everyone in Japan has a "name card" -- a business card -- with plenty of contact information. In most situations, an exchange of name cards is a fundamental part of the meeting ritual. If you are going to spend any time in Japan, you need to learn the fine points of the greeting ritual (especially how to properly respect the name card). Granted, the name ...


6

Unfortunately, this is not easy to answer, and highly dependent on the country. As discussed here for example in the context of young people for Japan. You will have to specify what type of people you want to meet and in which country you are to get a good answer with concrete points to follow on this. Some general pointers that will drastically improve ...


6

Just go with the flow - make sure you (and your wife) are self sufficient, so if a plan someone else is managing goes wrong, you now you two can still have fun. This can take a lot of the worry out of organised events. Alternatively, just work to a couple of meeting points through the day, say lunch and dinner, and do your own thing until then, just meeting ...


6

After quite some searching, the best I can provide is a link on gumtree which shows classified ads for soccer in Dublin. Several of them are trying to form teams or need extra players, and I'm sure would be happy to have a visitor join in for a game!


5

I have had a lot of looking at sites like this (Traveller Century Club, Most Traveled People, etc), and while there's a US Centric one (The All Fifty States Club), I've never seen a European one. Perhaps it's time to start one? :) Of course, the biggest problem you'll have is - what counts as a visit? This blog post has a great description of the argument ...


5

That is easy: Piet de Leeuw If you like garlic you might also consider The garlic queen. The options regarding steak are not huge, but you'll never forget the experience


5

Cheek kissing - Wikipedia and How to air kiss - Wikihow gives conventions about kissing in diffrent countries, precising it's often the right cheek first. ("Air" kiss because your lips don't actually go on the cheek, it's more cheek-on-cheek and you make the noise with your lips.) Only for France, combiendebises.com gives stats for each department about the ...


5

For classical tourism locations, you might be having troubles since people of that age do not really like to travel to temples and other places that tourists like. Younger Japanese people prefer to go abroad (Korea, Hong Kong, Thailand) since this is often cheaper than traveling in Hong Kong. And since they have to go to Japanese temples and museums with ...


4

In the countries of the Levant (especially Lebanon, Syria, Jordan), cheek kissing is quite common. Depending on the situation, it might not be appropriate to cheek-kiss a member of the opposite sex. However, in some areas such as the coastal part of Syria and most of Lebanon, or in case you're close friends or relatives, it's also common to cheek-kiss a ...


4

AirBaltic has a "Seat Buddy" program where they let people choose to sit with other passengers with similar moods / interests. Arguably, Airtroductions has tried to get dating in flight happening, but it's dubious as to whether they ever properly got "off the ground". Planely lets you reach out to other passengers on your flight too (although they also ...


4

I started as a comment but it grew too big. The answer is everyone's experience is different. In my job I met a lot of people who relocated, sometimes from very far, to my city and each adapted differently. The vicious cycle is, if you feel down you lack energy, but the best way to beat it is to keep busy...which require energy. It's tough, but there's hope ...


4

In addition to uncovery's answer which I wholeheartedly agree with, beaches are a great choice too. Part-time staff in bars and restaurants often have a day off on a weekday, and they are generally younger, so even during the week you should be able to find some people to talk to. As an archipelago, there are a lot of beaches. Find one that has easy access ...


3

Greetings have in fact been studied extensively by anthropologists and even by ethologists. For example, Irenäus Eibl-Eibesfeldt describes many of them in some of his books. Not much practical advice but truly surprising stuff. For example, spitting on the palm of your hand and rubbing it on the other person's face, or turning around and bending forward to ...


3

Though your question doesn't contain sufficient information but what I can understand you want to travel from Delhi -> Agra -> Rajasthan -> Western (Mumbai/khandala/Pune/Goa) -> to Eastern (Calcutta). Yes you are right, its very easy to meet people in India but to meet right people is bit sometime. You will be flooded with Tourist guides at every location ...


2

Key in such situations is to "live and let live". I think it is normal to require some personal time. Some need it more then others and sometimes even an individual needs a lot of personal time one day, only to fully enjoy the group the other day. Instead of you making the focal point by expressing the need for personal time, just state that everybody ...


2

It's always easier to meet other travellers whilst travelling. Locals going out in their home environment usually go with their friends and aren't really interested or 'open' to be joined by a stranger since it requires extra effort. That said the best places are pubs or bars with share tables. I am German and don't think it's too hard to meet Germans in a ...


1

When doing business in Europe (Netherlands, UK, Belgium, Germany, French, Sweden, Denmark) I have always used handshakes. It allows you physical contact without invading their personal space. By making physical contact you give people a signal that you trust them. I have always felt kisses were to much up close, and could be awkward. Meeting with friends is ...


1

Although I can vouch for how awesome Contiki is, I can understand that the price-point is higher than you'd spend on your own. As Mark Mayo pointed out, it's really easy to find where the party is at in Australia. Nearly all of the top-rated hostels found on HostelWorld will be a party with a bar and sometimes a club. I stayed at Base Hostel in Melbourne ...


1

As long term low budget traveller Anton Krotov remarked in one of his books, interactions with people are simply different if you don't pay them for the interaction (as you would do when going to a hotel or taking a taxi). If you mainly use hitchhiking for transport and hospitality exchange for lodging you're almost constantly meeting new people.


1

If you have the right mindset and are up for it, nothing beats hitchhiking for meeting the locals when in a foreign country. It's definitely not for everybody and it's not without potential risks, probably moreso for females and younger people. But it's hard to beat for meeting people you would never meet otherwise, from all backgrounds. You never know ...


1

I may be missing something obvious, but why not just ask them? I'm even inclined to suspect that, if they didn't share their contact details when you parted ways, they aren't necessarily that keen on staying in touch... Also, Facebook isn't that popular in Japan, although it has gone a long way in closing the gap with local alternative Mixi in the last ...



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