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8

Generally speaking, TGV tickets are bound to a specific train connection. Higher fares (pro ticket) allow free exchanges and refunds but I think you are still supposed to do it prior to boarding (even a few minutes before, traditionally with dedicated machines in the station's concourse but there is now a mobile app as well) rather than just showing up in ...


6

Some rules explained here (in French): http://aide.voyages-sncf.com/toute-laide-train/suite-mon-achat/echange-et-annulation/conditions-d-echange-d-annulation-et-de-remboursement And a version in English : http://help.en.voyages-sncf.com/en/exchange-cancellation/conditions It depends on which fare you have paid when booking your ticket. TGV are in the ...


6

On SNCF website for Intercités trains, one can find a map of all Intercités de Jour with different line style for those with required reservations. Giving a quick look at it, this does not seem to follow a specific logic, some lines having both, some lines having only either with or without reservation. There is no geographical logic either.


6

“Borne libre service” means that you'll pick up your ticket at a ticket vending machine in France or Luxembourg. (Maybe also in Eurostar stations, but I'm not sure if these allow you to print out tickets that aren't Eurostar tickets.) Every major train station and most if not all minor stations have a ticket vending machine, and there are also vending ...


5

I would be very surprised if a non-SNCF machine would let you pick up the tickets, and I would doubt that there are any SNCF machines outside of France (apart from perhaps a few exceptions like the SNCF station in Basel). Unless you are really short of time you shouldn't find yourself queueing for long or at all. At the larger stations there are a number of ...


4

It seems the answer for requests submitted online is under a week. On Wednesday 18th June I submitted two requests online, one for a journey which was delayed, one for a journey which was cancelled due to the strike. On Friday 20th I received a response to my cancelled train request, denying it due to the strike. On Monday 23rd I received a response to my ...


4

I have no other reference than my own experience. I filled the online form or sometimes sent the envelope they give when the train is late. The process seems relatively automated, I suppose they check manually only cases like yours, but it still takes time. Over the 5 to 10 times I filed such complaints, I usually waited 1 to 2 months. I would say that as ...


4

I haven't been able to find a definitive answer but there is an official guide about the rules during the strike. It seems possible to get a refund even if the ticket would otherwise be non-refundable: Tous les billets, quels que soient les tarifs, y compris "non échangeables / non remboursables" tels que Prem's seront remboursés sans frais si vous en ...


4

No. TER mean regional trains. They are funded and managed by the region administration and operated by SNCF. Intercités are national trains operated by SNCF. The distinction might not be clear, but they are not managed the same way and their pricing is different. This would be weird to be able to pay a certain amount for a TER ticket and get on an ...


4

SNCF uses Revenue Management techniques on the pricing of Intercités. So, yes to your first question, the price varies over time and most likely, the earlier you buy your ticket, the better deal you'll get (from my experience this is almost always true). But for this, you will need to make a firm reservation and will not get a refund on the ...


4

Whether you can get a refund on a ticket will depend on the fare conditions of that ticket. Your confirmation should make clear of these conditions and you'll have been made aware of them prior to purchase. If you booked a cheap advance fare by TER Corail (in the region of about £18-20) then this will likely be a non flexible meaning it's not refundable ...


3

Yes as long as your train leg has a AF/KL flight number it will be registered to your Flying Blue account. I have done that multiple times. There is even an unexpected benefit, the trip in the train counts as a flight and as such might help in getting to the elite level in Flying Blue. An additional benefit is that a delay of the train to CDG will entitle ...


3

The Nantes–La Rochelle–Bordeaux line is an intercités line; intercités trains have no compulsory reservation. From Rennes to Nantes, you would take a TER (regional train), also without reservation. (Depending on the times, you might end up with a different mixture of TER and intercités, but my point is that this journey does not involve trains requiring a ...


3

I can see this is an old thread but I stumbled across it and wanted to explain why I think you were able to print both tickets before, but not this time. It sounds as though you previously purchased what's called a "French Connection" fare. These are combined Eurostar+TGV tickets that are bundled together by Eurostar (Eurostar is part-owned by SNCF and ...


3

There used to be a sncf boutique in Brussels. It is now named Rail europe. You can find them at: Rail Europe, Avenue Henri Jaspar 113, 1060 Bruxelles But can't you print your tickets at home? I haven't been travelling with the sncf for a while, but I used to travel to Paris a lot some years back, where I always downloaded and printed my tickets at home.


3

You can look up the timetables on the Intercités website. Intercité trains with compulsory reservation are marked with a R in a box above the train number. In addition, all Intercité de nuit (night trains) and TGV (high-speed trains) require a reservation, and TER (regional trains) never do. On the train booking interface, you'll find the indication ...


2

Unfortunately no, it does not seem possible to update your ticket with a membership card number after buying the ticket. On the help of voyages-sncf.com{french}, the question is answered with the suggestion to exchange your current ticket for a new one, mentioning your membership number. My opinion is that it is worth only if you can cancel your ticket for ...


2

I've found the answer in the SNCF FAQ page on TGVAir: Je suis adhérent(e) aux programmes de fidélité de la compagnie aérienne et de TGV, lequel s’applique ? Votre billet est assimilé à un billet aérien, c'est donc le programme de fidélité de la compagnie aérienne qui s'applique. Which roughly translates as your ticket is considered to be an air ...


1

As @Gagravarr said, you can take any tgv the day of the strike. But unlike what he said, you may be able to cancel your ticket and get a refund. If the fare is "Prem's" or iDTGV, then you cannot get a refund unless there is actually a strike, but you might not know before Saturday night. If the fare is "Loisirs", "Loisirs Jeune" or bought with any ...


1

Short answer - no, you can't get a refund on a non-refundable ticket until your train is announced as cancelled, but it probably doesn't matter... If your train is cancelled, you'll be able to get a full refund of the ticket cost of the cancelled train, no matter what the conditions normally on it. You can do that at the station (expect epic queues), or via ...


1

Ok, so the reality uncovered: You can take any train it seems, at least on board of both trains I took they said that any ticket for this or the previous day is valid. However, nobody checked anyone in any of these trains, and I got similar experiences from other people I met in the last couple days. At all the stations, the boarding was a complete chaos; ...


1

Officially, no, you cannot take a non-idTGV train with an idTGV ticket, even on a strike day. The official answer about what happens if your idTGV train is canceled due to the strike is Nothing! idTGV handles everything! You will automatically receive an email with your compensation in the form of two vouchers for 100% and 20% of the price of your ...


1

Full-price (“tarif normal”) open train tickets are valid in all trains taking the route printed on the ticket, regardless of their status, except for trains that require a reservation. They are valid for two months after the travel date indicated on the ticket. When there are both TER and Intercités or even TGV on the same route, you will usually get the ...



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