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7

Bratislava is pretty much like most former Eastern Bloc locations in my experience. Especially in cities, most people who were teenagers at the end of communism have learned English to some degree. Most older people have not. This means there is no shortage of people up to about age thirty with pretty good English who can fill the jobs in the tourism ...


6

Unless you leave your car in the middle of a forest for a month, it is highly unlikely that you find it without wheels. In Tatras, there are parkings near the entrance to most trails. They normally charge 20-30PLN (= 5-7EUR) per day. If you start from a town (e.g. Zakopane), you can simply leave it on a street parking. In 2012 I left a car here and I didn't ...


6

I don't share your impression that Bratislava is more dangerous than other European cities. On the contrary I had some nice walks through Bratislava. I also had my share of not-stopping Austrians. But that is only my opinion. If you look at traffic fatalities worldwide, you see that the numbers are comparable among European countries. source: StatPlanet ...


5

I've been there twice, and for the most part, had no trouble navigating around in English. Most tourist places, shops owners and young people all spoke some English. Oh, and don't mention the movie "Hostel", some don't appreciate the image that and "Eurotrip" have given their city ;)


5

Firstly, you cannot legally camp in Tatras. There are no designated places for camping and you risk being fined (66EUR in 2009 (1)). I am writing in EUR as it is probably easier to understand than PLN. The shelters will take EUR as well as PLN (on both sides of the border, I imagine). There are many shelters on both Polish and Slovakian sides (map, in ...


4

Unfortunately Euro is not commonly accepted in Poland, just as Polish currency (PLN) is not accepted in Slovakia. In Poland it is usually easy to exchange major currencies (including EUR) into the local currency, there are many cash machines as well. Many places (but by no means all) accept credit cards as a form of payment. In Slovakia and Germany you have ...


4

In theory, a mountain hut should never send away a tired tourist, especially if he doesn't have a chance to reach another safe place before sundown. But in summer some of the huts are so full, that tourist need to sleep in dining room on the floor. In Slovakia, the huts range from small, with capacity of 20 people, to large with capacity of over 100 ...


3

Whilst I have never been to Slovakia, I have quite a few Slovak friends here in the UK, their spoken English is fine. Similarly I have been on holiday to quite a few European resorts where a number of Slovakian people work in the hotels, and bars close by. They all speak English without problem. In fact I asked one Slovakian girl whilst on holiday recently ...


3

As far as I know, English, German and Polish is about as good language combination as it can get going to Bratislava. In a big city such as Bratislava, most young people will speak English. Maybe not fluently, but good enough to communicate. Most older people, who speak any foreign language, speak German. Some also speak Russian, but they turn unfriendly ...


3

In my experience hostels pretty much anywhere in Europe can be full in summer if you don't have a booking. You can start risking arriving without a booking once the weather starts to change. If you are just going to rock up at the hostel unannounced your chances are much better in the morning around check-out time. Then again I hate booking hostels, even ...


2

I went two Julys in a row - 2008 and 2009. Both times I just wandered into (different) hostels and got a bed, no problem. Indeed, the second time it was with 2 friends, so we needed three beds. Of course, you could just keep an eye on bookings on various hostel websites, as they often indicate how many beds are remaining, and use that to help make your ...


2

Yes, on 15 august shops in Slovakia are open, and other places like museum also are open.


2

It appears that Slovakia does not celebrate Mary's Assumption, unlike Austria: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_holidays_in_Slovakia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public_holidays_in_Austria#Austria So, it's pretty safe to say that shops and museum will be open in Slovakia on the 15th of August.


2

I'm from Slovakia and have traveled to Poland quite often. I now live in the US and visit Slovakia with US bank-issued credit cards. First, you need Euro in Slovakia. The only place in Slovakia where Polish currency would be usable would be the restroom. You can bring cash in USD and exchange it for Euro in banks or even better in places called Zmenaren ...


2

In all of the mentioned countries you'll have no problems taking out money from ATMs using Visa or Maestro. But you'll pay twice: first a commission in ATM, second the split between buy and sell price in banks, which is usually quite big. In case of Poland, the split in bank is about 2-3 times bigger than by Kantors. Kantor is a specialized money exchange ...


1

Accommodation Yes, there are some accommodation options in the Tatras mountains. I do not know precisely where you want to go but you can check on Open Street Map if there are shelters on your way. According to the Wikivoyage page for the Slovakian High Tatras, there are many huts but they commonly close for the winter. The linked website has a list of ...



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