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48

In the US, it really depends on where you are staying. In a big hotel in a city, it would be expected that you wear street clothes or even casual business wear in the public areas. Granted you could get away with wandering down the hall to get some ice or a soda from the vending machine in your pajamas, but lounging in the lobby or a reading room and ...


45

Many phones have a silent, vibration only mode as part of the regular alarms. A cheap Fitbit Flex band will do that too. If a vibrating alarm isn't enough, you can get a wristband that delivers electric shocks to wake up, such as the Pavlok wristband (store): At first, it will act like any other alarm clock, with a gentle vibration to get you up. But if ...


44

A bed runner is a small, long piece of decorated cloth used to enhance the appearance of an otherwise plain bed. While some prefer the look solely for aesthetic reasons and would choose it even if it were more expensive than traditional decorative bedding, the primary reason to use one in the hospitality industry is to reduce costs while keeping the room ...


44

Given that some airlines even give you a complimentary pyjama when flying in first class I'd say that it would be perfectly legal for you to wear one on the plane regardless of which class you're flying in. Worst case scenario you'll get some looks from other passengers. Go ahead and fly comfortable.


31

You can use a belt to hold beds together. Wrap it around the side frame. Or if you have a couple, just join two pair of legs. This worked for me.


28

There is no clear explicit rule regarding sleeping next to bulkheads. Why are some airlines strict about it? the usual "safety" excuse is used here and I can assure you this time the safety excuse is legitimate. In addition to that, passengers are only allowed to sit in "passenger seats", they are not even allowed to sit on crew seats, so this can be used as ...


27

One thing that worked for me before is wire ties. 2 or 3 of these can easily hold the two beds together so that they don't slide apart. Then you fill the narrow gap with a folded sheet or blanket and put regular sheets over it. Depending on the type of bed, you may need different length wire ties. Simple metal frame is the easiest. Wider wooden frames ...


26

Get a Window Seat When I reserve a seat on train (or a plane, for that matter), knowing that I would like to sleep during the journey, I often book a window seat. That way I can lean my head on the window, rather than having it hanging in the void, causing me to wake up every ten minutes as soon as the neck ache kicks in. Moreover I place a ...


25

The problem of airplanes is the sheer number of ways in which it differs from your normal sleeping routine: Noise (silence is pretty much impossible) Light (they're never totally off even in "sleep mode") Comfort (unless you sleep on a rock-hard mattress, not the same) Temperature (the cabin tends to be cold on long flights) Peace (interruption from other ...


25

The legal situation is unfortunately a bit more complicated than what is stated by Dirty-flow and user24582. Even if the German traffic regulations do not directly forbid you to sleep in your car, you may easily violate other regulations doing so. Roads and public parking spaces may in general only be used for traffical purposes and even though stopping ...


24

While I don't regularly sleep in the airports, I suggest you check out these tips: Whether you are sleeping in the airport by yourself or with friends, it is good to know where security is. Know where their office is and look for video cameras in the spot you decide to stay the night. They've probably seen many airport sleepers before you and they will ...


23

While there is plenty of good advice in the other answers, I feel I have some more to offer that is a little less spontaneous. Sleeping on a plane is a learned skill and it is improved by planning, preparation, and practice. You can change the likelihood of sleep from nearly nil to nearly guaranteed, but not if the first time you start to think about it is ...


23

Immediately turn off your alarm after you're awake. So, keep the alarm very close to your ears, under or next to your cushion, or perhaps above your head, if your hostel bed allows for that. And find the lowest sound level that wakes you.


23

You should not feel self conscious about having to wake up early. We've all had to do this at some point during our (backpacking) travels, hence you can expect people to be tolerant about your early bird alarm. Having said this there are a few unwritten rules you should respect when having to get up early in the morning in a shared hostel room: Place your ...


22

As @Dirty-flow said, sleeping in the car is allowed, but you should not sleep in the driver's seat etc. if you are drunk, to omit being fined for drunk driving. There are many areas, especially inside of the "Mittlerer Ring", where parking is restricted (residents only or parking ticket, see map or text). I'd suggest to park somewhere in the outskirts, ...


21

Yes, you can wear your pajamas during a flight. You might get some strange looks, but there is nothing wrong with wearing them. Other options would be a 'sweat suit' with elastic at the waist and a t-shirt and hoodie for the top.


20

Take your own food. As a rule, the food served on trains is bland and overpriced. He will probably have time at the stations to purchase extra drinks, or if not get them on the train. He is probably not going to sleep that well in a regular train compartment (I never do at least). Obviously he should take a book. The main risk if he is travelling alone is ...


19

The only realistic answer to this question is that there is no answer. Standards of dress in the US are not standardized, except in certain contexts like prisons, the military, certain types of business, Catholic schools, and fancy restaurants. Circa 1960 was the last time in the US when there was some kind of general consensus on what was proper dress in ...


18

I haven't tried this method, but it's what immediately came to my mind when I saw this question:


18

In addition to the sound advice from victoriah, here are also a few more points to consider: Some trains have power sockets that you can use, so bringing an entertainment device (laptop/netbook/tablet) stocked with stuff to read/watch might be a good idea. Bringing a power strip will also make you popular among other travellers, if power sockets are in ...


18

The area you will cover is a bit broad but there are generally rules that you can follow: If you see the No Overnight Parking sign that has an obvious meaning. There are plenty of roadside motels and camping grounds where you can park overnight and sleep. The municipalities may institute their own rules for overnight parking and sleeping in cars so when ...


18

California has some rigorous laws against vagrancy and homelessness and depending upon local ordinances or just plain bad luck you could be in for a nightmare. If you have to do it, try to be outside the city limits. Based upon what you wrote, you will most likely have a license plate that identifies a rent-a-car. That will flag up as unusual for anybody ...


18

Short answer: no. In North America, public spaces require public dress. You would not, for example, wear a swimsuit to the restaurant. Asia is a bit more relaxed - you can walk around a Japanese resort town in what amounts to a housecoat.


17

Hire someone to come slap you at the designated wake-up time.


17

Technically it's entirely possible, and airplane manufacturers release sketches like this regularly. There are three intertwingled main reasons why this hasn't (cough) taken off yet in practice: Airplanes have really tight regulatory safety requirements, including everybody on board being able to evacuate within a certain number of seconds, and this is ...


16

Personally I've given up, and in some ways, since I did that, I've actually ended up sleeping more - quite the paradox! Don't go onboard PLANNING to sleep. My view is that I'll be settling in for 20-something hours of movies (CHC to LON). I can stay awake pretty well, but find it very difficult to get to sleep sitting up. Anywhere. What I've found as a ...


16

Do you need to stay awake? Most airports allow sleeping, in varying degrees of comfort, and there's even a site devoted to this. Just set an alarm (or three) to wake you up before your flight: two hours early if you haven't checked in yet, one hour if you have. It's usually also perfectly safe to sleep in airports, especially airside (after security & ...


16

You can also get a vibrating alarm, which you can find in stores selling goods for hearing-impaired people.


15

I have a crappy old mobile phone that doesn't even work as a phone but it's handy as an addressbook and of course an alarm clock. And like most phones for years no matter how cheap and crappy it has a silent vibration setting. Don't you have a phone? Doesn't it have a silent vibrating alarm?


15

As a night clerk at a 2 star hotel in the US, I can say it depends, mainly on if you're comfortable with it. Most people wear non-sleep clothes while not in their rooms. However, there are some people who will walk around in pajamas. On very rare occasions, I've even seen people come to breakfast in their pajamas. Higher star hotels may be more rigid, and I ...



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