Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

Two weeks is a decent amount of time to explore Cambodia. Here are a couple of my recommendations: Siem Reap: The Angkor Wat and surrounding temples can either be covered in a day, or over a couple of days. This is important because you need to buy a pass, and there are passes of different durations: 1-day ($20), 3-day ($40) etc. There's a 7-day pass too ...


6

Another option would be to go through Thailand, take a bus from Pakse to Ubon Ratchathani (3 hours leaving 7:30 am). From there take a bus to Surin running on highway 24, there may be a train (3 hours) as well. From Surin you can take a swangthaew or minibus to the Cambodian border at Chong Jom (2-3 hours). 16 km south of the border is Along Veng but ...


4

There are boats between Battambang and Siem Reap, they leave in the morning (around 7am) and take most of the day. You spend several hours on a small river where you can see tons of animals and birds, later you cross Tonle Sap Lake, the last part to Siem Riep is by jeep. It takes a while but its a great ride. The fruit shakes in Battambang are ...


4

There is no convenient midpoint stop, I think it's better to just bear the long road journey (I hear it's better in 2012 than few years ago). Chachoengsao has a huge buddhist temple (allegedly the largest in the world), an old market and a decent river tour. Worth a visit, technically on the way, but rather close to Bangkok (1-2h). Poipet is a seedy ...


3

No, you cannot do this any more. The reason is that the Angkor Wat archaeological park is a protected complex, and drivers need to be registered with the authorities who maintain the park to be allowed into it. My tuk-tuk driver told me they need to be registered too, and of course, any tourists need to buy a valid pass. I am guessing that people who live ...


3

Yeah - the boats can't run in the dry season. You can get a taxi from about $30 (depends on your bargaining skills and what stage of the tourist season it is). There are also inter-city buses that run between the two starting at about $6. Prepare for a long and uncomfortable trip, with lots of stops. The taxi is worth every cent. The taxi's default speed is ...


2

From everything online (blogs, wikitravel, and websites) the ferry as you know is best in the wet season, when the river is high (June to November, usually) However, as the dry season approaches or ends, it's debateable. If the rain comes early, you could be ok. However April is quite well into the dry season, but still over a month before the rains - ...


2

What is still possible for tourists is to rent bicycles (basic ones go for $2-3/day, mountain bikes for $5-8). Given the terrain (completely flat, pretty good roads, mostly shady) and distances (ca. 17km for the "small cycle", 28km for the "grand cycle"), that's actually a perfectly workable alternative, if you like to be physically active. The midday ...


1

While in Seam Reap I'd also recommend going on a boat trip on the Tonlé Sap lake to see the floating villages. As Ankur suggests you can hire a tuk-tuk driver for the day for like $15. We hired one who drove us to the lake (which was an adventure in itself down a crazy mud/clay road) and came with us on the boat trip. It lasted a few hours and was quite ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible