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41

This is the dining car on the train between Perm and Moscow (Trans Siberian)... As shown, there are ample provisions with the most concern devoted to alcoholic beverages. But there's nearly every kind of food available for snacking and hot meals. The dining cars are well above UK standard and minimally equal to or superior to European standard. You can ...


31

Easy, since I've done this trip. In Yekaterinburg, go to the markets and get some base food. Whatever drinks you want, but vodka will be good to share if you're the sharing type (especially in platzkart class). Water too, especially in summer. You'll want snacks, try and not take anything smelly (Strong cheese, fish that might smell in heat). I highly ...


31

Here is a (blurry, sorry!) picture of the menu as I found it when travelling on the Trans-Siberian Railroad in 2013. Here are some further pictures of the specialties, pancakes, and appetizers. They have quite a respectable assortment, and I think they actually had most of it in stock (in contrast to the Chinese restaurant car, which was out of nearly ...


22

Dining cars are present on almost every long-distance train. They offer rather good food (although I have little experience to compare it to European trains), though I would not expect much delicacies, just a good food of a middle-range city restaurant. Specifically for Baikal fish, I doubt it, except probably when you travel near Baikal itself. In addition ...


14

In addition to other answer: Every long-distance train contain a car with restaurant in it, it's located in a middle of the train, and it works nearly 24-long, so you can try out the food there. Also there are always some snacks you can buy on the car-holder. As other's mentioned, on some stations you can find a local food, but be cautious with it as there ...


13

Random thoughts: When packing some food for the trip I really recommend going to a big store and getting things you know well. I recommend to avoid kvass if you didn't drink it a lot before. Same thing for kefir and its relatives. They can be a digestion problem for those who are not accustomed to them. Any fermented food is not a good option ...


12

First of all, Taiga is very big thing, so address in the Taiga isn't much helpful for you :) Secondary, my apologies about some information is only in Russian, especially maps. The Curch of the Last Testament has their village in the Krasnoyarsk Krai. Their site is very old, and the only thing working there is the main page. Also they have international ...


10

Whether or not it's advisable is totally up to you - it's a subjective question and each person is different, so we can't answer that aspect. It'll be difficult, so accept that now and enjoy the ride ;) I've flown into Novosibirsk, and there were taxis from the airport. So as long as you have the name of your accommodation (or address), preferably written ...


10

In addition, consider to take some Doshirak lunchboxes (it's usual for Russians), fast oatmeals, buns or cakes and at least 2 bottles of still water (not lemonade!). It's also OK to take apples or other fruits, except of oranges (oranges are not the best choice for travelers), cucumbers. Drink tea for saving your own water. Be sure you have plenty of ...


9

Eating utensils A mug is a must. Also, a spoon, a fork and a knife might be really useful. A bowl is also good to have if you have enough space. Of course, make sure these are from plastic so that they will not break if fall down to floor, and make sure they are suitable for hot water. Paper napkins is also good to have. Where to shop Avoid shopping ...


9

I suggest this route - Moscow, Nizhny Novgorod (very old and beautiful city, temples, architecture, museums), Kazan (one of the oldest cities in Russia. Recommend to visit the Kazan Kremlin, Kul-Sharif), Ufa (great culture and good people, rich Bashkir national cuisine. One of the best honey in the world produce here. And in this city I live.))) help you to ...


9

Maybe an obvious question, but have you looked at doing the Trans-Siberian Express instead of going back and forth to Moscow? You could land in Moscow, catch the TSE to Vladivostok and fly back from there to Iran. Train travel time for that particular version is I believe 6 days. As far as things to see in Siberia -- Lake Baikal is what immediately ...


9

My information is a bit outdated (1999 and 2000), but you can expect every carriage on long distance trains to have a samovar with boiling hot water available to you. As @michael-borgwardt points out, at plenty of stops outsiders will be selling food. And they will do so on the stops where they know there will be enough time for you to buy it. I also seem ...


8

Accprding to this map below, you can drive from Beijing to Tuva, passing through Ulanbaataar, Bulgan and Naryn. There does not seem to be a very well established access from the west such as from Urumuqi however. The place where I found the map has some more general information on traveling through Mongolia. I found also a much more detailed map.


6

There is hot water in each carriage, so do for drinking instant coffee or tea is a good choice. If you want to "eat cheap", instant noodles / instant food is the right choice for you. Otherwise, the food in the dining car is also very good, you will get typical Russian food, and also it is not that expensive (usually US$5 - 8 in Rouble).


6

As russian, I should mention other firm, much more popular here in Russian: Baikal Dreams They have a good set of offers, including Eco projects with volunteer work (linked above), and more traditional tours. I think you should check the Active tours to Baikal - if they are offering the climbing tour, they definitely can provide a tour with boat :) Even ...


6

Doing the sites on Kamchatka or Sakhalin on your own is possible but but personally I would not recommend it without good knowledge of the language and lots and lots of time. To get to Sakhalin you could take a ferry from Vanino problem is you have to get to that port first. The same company provides cargo service from Vladivostok to Petropavlovsk-...


5

At nearly every stop, there are local people selling food to the travellers. Source: TV documentaries I've seen.


5

If you have only 2 weeks - 3 days in Moscow = 11-10 days, then forget about European part of Russia and go straight to Siberia. I don't know why everybody suggests TSR, but personally it is very dull to sit in train for a week. First try to feel Moscow life rhythm. You will see later how it is different in Siberia. Then I suggest you to fly from Moscow to ...


5

Unfortunately, can't provide any english-language links. Try to contact this firm, they have amazing pack of offers, such as tour to the Lake Khövsgöl on horse or even hunting! You'll stay in lovely houses like this, they have sattelite TV there and traditional Mongolian furniture:


5

I don't think that there will be some special actions in November for Russian Railways. May be some additional trains for the Unity Day, but this isn't the case for you. But I have a good news for you - there always some discounts depending on the train, and some special pricing for international trains. Bad news is that the main interesting actions are in ...


4

I used to live in Russia. Yes, there is usually a restaurant car in the middle of long haul train. Yes, the water boilers is available in every single car, so you can get tea or coffee. But that is it. Answering your question, you should not expect any quality of food on the train or on any stops. Try to avoid it, you may then get a dissent vacation. If u ...


4

Crossing the border by road does seem to be an option, but only at certain border crossing points. (The crossing specified by Google Maps, unfortunately, seems to be sandwiched between the two ones open to foreign nationals.) There are some reports that you can either get permission or "talk your way across" if you're feeling up to the task (and possible ...


4

Choose Irkutsk as home base. Travel to Olkhon island and rent a boat from there (cheaper) and/or join some group for a day boat trip. Using a boat to go from the west to the east coast is more exciting and quicker, but not cheaper. Public hydrofoil goes on every Monday in July and August. Departure Olkhon (Khuzir village) at 5pm; arrives Ust-Barguzin three ...


4

Not sure about the Lake Khövsgöl but Baikal is pretty easy to get to. There is a lot of tours being operated in the area and there is a major city which you can fly, drive, train ride into to get started. And little did I know about this hotel which looks to be right on the lake.


4

You will end up paying quite alot to go by road because you will need to hire a driver/tour guide. The borders in these areas change their regulations too. There is/was a crossing into China which leads to a town called Barkol, and then onto Urumqi. Depending on who you ask, you need a Chinese tour agent hired to meet you at the China side if you are ...


3

Yes, Russian Railways uses prices, that depend on season. You can see it (but only in Russian) for 2015, previous years were the same. Usually from mid-September to a week before New Year's Holidays tickets are 10% cheaper. Also, Russian Railways has a good tradition to set 50% discount for everyone on Victory Day. But in other holidays tickets has higher ...



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