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50

In my eyes 7/7 is shorthand for French 7 jours sur 7 which translates to 7 days out of 7. Meaning the business is open all week. Note that this does not necessarily mean that the business is also open 24h. Indeed in France you often read 7j/7 written on shops that are open every day of the week (note the little j, standing for jours == days). For example, ...


32

Even though the people who walk past are unlikely to be want to buy a suitcase right now, they are still the target demographic. How many other locations are there in a city where you can open a store where 100% of the people that walk past are people that travel by air, and thus the type of people that will be in the market for your products? How many ...


18

Setting aside the people who suddenly need more or different suitcases, an airport is one of the few places where you feel dissatisfied with the suitcases you have. While they're sitting in your closet, they're fine. You've used them for years and they work. But for the hour or two after you've packed them, lugged them from the car into the airport, and ...


10

Suitcases may fail in transit. That's a built-in market for replacements.


9

I've had reasonable luck with large stores aimed at locals such as Carrefour or Sam's Club. It's also entertaining (for me anyway) to see what else is on offer. Of course they may not have the total kitsch but if you're flexible there can be some interesting finds. Another option is gift shops at museums - which often have more tasteful stuff, and campus ...


8

I'd go to Kappabashi-dori, conveniently located between Ueno and Asakusa next to Tawaramachi stn on the Ginza line. It's Tokyo's main restaurant wholesale district and sells everything you need for food preparation or presentation at low prices, Wikivoyage has a bit more info. Note that the Japanese term for lacquerware is shikki (漆器), urushi-nuri is the ...


6

Not sure where you've been reading that, but I can assure you they're quite wrong, Sim Lim Square sells every make of cheap electronics, so Chinese no-name brands and outright ripoffs are legion. Back in the day when iPhones were the new hotness and weren't officially available in Singapore yet, I remember seeing a plethora of "jPhones", "iFones", "iPhons" ...


6

Negotiate to Reach an Agreement The first thing to understand is that the purpose of negotiating is to reach an agreement. It's not about beating someone, but rather you should aim for a mutual victory. Someone is selling something you want/need for a given price, and you wish to pay a different price. If at the end of the negotiation you walk away without ...


6

You can certainly buy a belt airside at ATL. Hartsfield-Jackson's website offers a directory of retail concessions, which includes pictures of most of the storefronts— you need not be familiar with the names; you can scroll through and find something that doesn't sound like a newsstand or electronics store and see from the picture or read from the blurb. ...


6

Yaoi Manga is a genre of illustrated books that contain homo-erotic content, or in some other way appeal to the prurient interest of its fans. It's soft-porn and does not feature children. Other Manga genres devoted to children are outside the scope of this answer. These books are available over-the-counter in Europe. As evidence, here's an Amazon ...


6

A lot depends on the actual content. IF the content is illegal where you're taking it (and that includes any layovers/stopovers) you stand to get into some serious legal trouble. For example, last year someone was arrested and convicted in Norway for possession of child pornography. His crime? He had 3 manga/hentai cartoons in his house, which included ...


5

The best source for authorized Apple retailers will be Apple itself. Apple's Turkish website links you to sales information in Turkish or English. A search for turns up listings and a map for dozens of authorized retailers within Ankara, and dozens more in nearby cities such as Kirikkale and Çankiri. Additionally, Apple's Online Store has been operating in ...


5

According to this thread on a dedicated forum there's a bike shop called Flying Bikes in Phnom Penh that should sell Hydrapacks's. Flying Bikes sell Hydrapaks - as good as a camelbak. A quick search on Google maps reveals that there are two homonymous shops with incremental names. I'm not sure if they are part of the same franchise though. Here is ...


4

I would say that because the law is not on the consumer side in the USA and therefore does not require the total price to be displayed. Most shops will therefore leave off taxes etc as you are then more likely to buy an item. (Trustworthily companies loose trade due to other companies misleading consumers on prices, so therefore quickly all the companies ...


4

You can buy reindeer meat (poronliha) in any supermarket. The "Herkku" gourmet supermarket in the basement of the Stockmann department store (corner of Mannerheimintie and Aleksanterinkatu) is pretty epic and a good place to buy this or anything else Finnish; not the cheapest, mind you, but not hugely expensive either. The canonical way to prepare it is ...


4

Here's a list of stores at LAX: http://www.lawa.org/tenantLAXResult.aspx?airport=4&category=38&sindicator=qs Based on the name, "Luggage Store - Before TSA" (Ticketing Level) can probably help you out. Depending on your budget there's also a Coach store in the Great Hall as well. I'm sure there are other stores that sell luggage as well but I can't ...


4

I managed to find a couple of shops which had "hydration bladders" as well as "hydration packs", all of them were westernised bicycle shops with a wide range of accessories. Flying Bikes 2 had a good quality 1 liter bladder for 23 USD and a lower quality 2 liter for 18 USD. On street 182 between Bd. Charles De Gaulle and Monivong Bd. there was a ...


4

Find a pack of appropriate size. Find other things from the store and stuff every compartment to the max. While packing everything you'll need. Put it on and walk around. Climb some stairs or step onto a bench/chair. Is it comfortable? Can you easily access some compartments while wearing it? Can you use the zippers while wearing gloves? Does it inhibit ...


3

Being a Nikonist myself, I can't recommend any shops for Fuji in particular, but for camera gear of any kind the place to go is Nipponbashi (日本橋) aka Den-Den Town ("Electric Town"), Osaka's equivalent to Tokyo's Akihabara, near Namba station. Tokiwa (トキワ) is the big name here, but there's a bunch of others as well. Naniwa (ナニワ) near Shinsaibashi is also ...


3

Not sure this fully explains it but the shopping area has certainly become an important revenue stream for many airports. I know several airports that have been redesigned to force passengers to pass in front of as many shops as possible, with S-shaped corridors and no short-cuts. Consequently, they sell a lot of things that most people don't need right ...


3

The obvious choices to get your electronics are: Sim Lim Square Funan Digitalife Mall Singapore While they do sell the big brands as you noticed, you should be able to also find no-name products for quite cheap. For instance I've been able to find generic iMac chargers at Sim Lim for a good price. Those malls are organised in a lot of small shops, so ...


3

You should really try the "Japan Traditional Crafts Aoyama Square" (伝統工芸 青山スクエ) It is located in Tokyo (Aoyama 1-chome station) and contain a large variety of traditional items, some being lacquerware. Address: Akasaka 8-1-22, Akasaka Oji Bldg 1F. Official Website: http://kougeihin.jp/ Other websites: http://whereintokyo.com/venues/25392.html ...


3

They are called "gassboks" (gas can) in Norwegian. I doubt that you'll find any at the airport, but if you are going by train from the airport to Finse, you'll have to change trains at Oslo Central Station and there are plenty of outdoor shops in downtown Oslo, which all are likely to have these on stock. If the shop you're linking to is sold out, there is ...


3

First, establish the use for the backpack. Will you be wearing it all day, in all kinds of weather, while walking 8 or 12 hours through nature? Or will you be putting it in the luggage compartment of buses or trains? Will you be using it in a city where you need to worry about pickpockets or bag-slicers? Does it matter that it fits the rules for carryon ...


3

In Shanghai, there is Tianshan Tea City. This is not far from the Zhongshan Park metro station. Also, the Cloud 9 shopping mall, which is directly accessible from that station, has a Carrefour where you can get decent tea at cheap prices. The local teas in that region are green teas, however – Long Jing, Bi Luo Chun and others. There is some oolong, ...


2

The reason why foreign books are seldom translated is simply that in Malaysia majority of book readers speak English very well. But there are books in Malaysian (Bahasa Malaysia) as well. You can buy books in Bahasa Malaysia in every large bookstore including Kinokuniya, simply ask the staff. But your best bet is to visit MPH bookstore. They have by far the ...


2

I recently transited through Terminal 2 and I wanted to go shopping. I was offered by the airport staff to transfer me to terminal 3 should I want to go shopping. I didn't take the offer as I was worried about missing my boarding time, but if you do have plenty of time it certainly is possible. The whole anecdote: For years and years non BA flights from ...


2

For anyone interessted, the kind of connection on these fuel canisters / gas cans is actually called a "Lindal Valve" We where able to get them at Oslo sportslager


2

Give-away shops ("weggeefwinkels") are quite different from what you're describing but they might suit your needs very well. Here is a list. This article has extensive information about sharing stuff in the Netherlands. It's in Dutch but translates well through Google Translate.



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