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I have asthma and spend plenty of time in China. Sometimes, especially in the winter in North China, the air is horrible (poor people burn coal for heat). Other times, things are ok. The last two years have been somewhat better. I have found it to be manageable. If you do not have asthma or another respiratory disease, I say "Don't Believe the Hype" and ...


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The post you link to says about exchanging money right after hotels: [...] Mostly people will go to banks. Remember to take your passport, which need to be presented when converting currency in the country. [...] On another page of the same site I find bank branches listed in Pudong airport: For your banking convenience, banks are located in the ...


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I can not find any mention of card expiry on both official and unofficial websites nor in the rules. Likely you will be able to use your cards even coming back after years but I have yet to personally confirm this (I must have some 2-3 old cards lying around somewhere). A local friend I asked also supposes that the card does not expire. However user @...


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Officially, or at least from Wikipedia: As of June 2006, the card has been interchangeable with the Wuxi Tai-Lake Transportation Card, and can also be used in Suzhou. So it can be used in at least one other major city. It doesn't look like it'll work in Beijing, however.


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Just to add my two cents but I arrived at Shanghai 6 days ago and while my first reaction is "oh, it stinks so bad!", the actual air pollution statistics is not so bad as to consider cancelling your trip, especially a short trip. In Air Quality Index, Shanghai reaches "Unhealthy" label around noon quite often, but so do all of other Asian cities like Tokyo, ...



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