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16

Officially it varies - the UN doesn't recognise Kosovo, but several others do. The big problem for you, as you observed - is Serbia, which considers it to be another province, and indeed administers five of the municipalities. The best warning I can find seems to come from Wikitravel: Visa Restrictions: Serbia officially states that it will block ...


11

If in doubt, as I was with several Central Asian airlines over summer, I head to Wikipedia. In this case, my favourite part is that their slogan is "In Safe Hands" ;) But seriously, Wiki reports that the airline has had 3 incidents and 2 accidents in its history, with a total of 68 fatalities. Other comments (with citations in the article): In 2004, Jat ...


11

In Wikipedia there is a page about the relations between Croatia and Serbia For the first time in history, Serbia as an independent country will be represented by its national team against the Croatian team on March 22, 2013 in qualification group A of the 2014 FIFA World Cup. For the safety of the lives of those attending the next two matches in 2013, ...


10

On the train line between Belgrade and Budapest are at least two interesting cities, Novi Sad and Subotica. I think there are both worth visiting even though I don't remember too many abandoned buildings (wasn't looking for them). You get quite a few of them in Belgrade. Over all on the Balkans, I've seen most damage from the wars in Bosnia-Herzogovina, ...


10

Serbians say that JAT stands for "Joke About Time"... but their on-time statistics are not so different than major European airlines (73% on time vs 75% for BA/AF/LH). JAT has been through awful times financially, cabin interiors are a bit scruffy, and their network is 1/10th of what it used to be, but the airline is safe. No fatalities since 1973. ...


8

According to the girl at the reception here at a hostel in Skopje there is an Exchange office in the Ramstore mall, next to the museum of Skopje. There they do exchange RSD, however I have not tried this myself. Worth a try.


8

It does not seem ubiquitous as I have also seen kids in saunas in France, Austria or Germany. But I also know some places in the Netherlands where the minimum age is 14 (I am mostly speaking about independent saunas, not hotel spas). Whether that means the hotel should give advance notice I don't know. I always expect some “cultural” differences and spas or ...


7

English is really widespread, so that would be your best bet. They might have trouble understanding, and you will probably have a lot of trouble understanding (since they have thickish accents). Unless of course you spoke another Yugo language, but I am assuming you don't since most people who do know that there is basically no difference. As for whether ...


7

You have to register yourself if you stay longer than 24h. I found some information on the US Bureau of Consular Affairs (CA): If you are staying in a private home, you must register with the local police station with authority over the area where you are staying within 24 hours of arriving in Serbia. If you do not register, you may be subject to ...


7

I've seen this in the US, kids are not allowed in spas or saunas in hotels that I've been to - because of the high temperature which can be harmful to kids who are less able to regulate their own temperature, and might not realize that they are overheating. This page has some information - http://www.the-infrared-sauna-effect.com/sauna-kids.html In ...


6

From the National Organization of Tourism in Serbia: REGISTRATION OF FOREIGNERS Serbian organizations and individuals providing accommodation to foreigners against payment, as well as locals hosting visiting foreigners, must register the foreigner’s stay with the local police station within 24 hours of the commencement of the accommodation ...


6

Yes you can. Starting from May 8, 2013 every EU citizen can enter to Kosovo with ID card only, as mentioned on the Kosovo Ministry of Foreign Affairs website (at the bottom of the page)


6

From Wikitravel: Language: Serbian 90.1% (official), Hungarian 3.8%, Romany (Gypsy) 1.1%, other 4.1%, unknown 0.9% (2002 census) So in that respect, Hungarian is the next best bet. However, that's 'official' languages and was a 2002 Census - if you keep on top of world affairs, things have changed a lot in that area since then. So reading further down ...


6

(I'm promoting and editing my comment to an answer since we haven't received anything better) While I was there (almost a week) I found only one exchange place in Skopje which didn't list RSD but did buy them when we asked about it (no selling though). The rate was terrible, about 25% below the official rate! I was suggested to try the bus station but ...


6

My experience with Serbian Railways tells me that such a service could be introduced or cancelled without much notice, it'd be a good idea to check in again closer to when you're travelling. I've emailed Mr. Popvic at the Wasteels Travel Agency Office in Belgrade station, since he tends to be in the know on such matters. I'll post here if he responds. I ...


5

According to a few Serbian websites, camping (setting up a tent) is not allowed in Kopaonik NP. A few Serbian campers mentioned setting up a tent a bit far off the road in the woods (being aware it's disallowed). Further search found this inn/restaurant which includes camping grounds. It is located in Vlajkovac, 244th km of the road from Belgrade (that ...


5

All I can say after research that there is no such thing there as areas for camping - you can set your tent anythere in safe, and relax. But be aware to the rules of National park. There are general things there, but I suggest you to check this on arrival. During summer in Kopaonik some hiking tours are available from various firms, and, maybe, you could ...


5

Going from Romania into Serbia, then into Kosovo and on to Albania should be no problem at all. The only problematic situation I know of is moving from a third country into Kosovo and then into Serbia and finally leave to another country. This is because when entering Serbia through Kosovo you don't get a Serbian entry stamp and therefor have not entered ...


5

EUR, anywhere in the country, because it's by far the most important currency for trade and remittances. Sample spreads here. However, the cash spread will almost certainly be higher than the rate you would get from an ATM, which is why you should just use a debit card.


5

The Embassy of Sweden in Pristina has some information regarding travelling to and from Kosovo on its homepage. It is could certainly be applied to travellers with other nationalities as well. In- och utresebestämmelser EU-medborgare är sedan 8 maj 2013 tillåtna att vid in- och utresa i Kosovo presentera en giltig identitetshandling i form av ...


5

You can find the schedules via the website of the Serbian Railways. Note that you have to use the Serbian spelling of Belgrade, i.e. BEOGRAD:


4

Don't take this as an exact amount but somewhere around 1 euros + some small (less than 0.5% of the withdrawn amount) percentage. Haven't gone and tested this with every one of them, but from what I'm aware, this is a relatively standard provision and applies to most banks in the region (Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina) when you're withdrawing cash from an ...


4

Here's what I found so far. Belgrade Airport Сash exchange machine in the airport, right at the baggage pickup area upon arrivals, as of 1 March 2014: USD: buy 80 (while official selling rate of National Bank of Serbia was 84.8722) -- which gives at least spread 6.09%, very likely more EUR: buy 110 (rate of National Bank of Serbia was 116.2834) -- which ...


4

Kosovo has not yet defined a particular policy on this topic. According to its Ministry of Foreign Affairs, there is no distinction based on the citizenship. Every citizen may therefore enter the country and stay for a maximum of 90 days. However, there are some rules to respect. You should be able to : Have some valid travel documents (thus coming from a ...


4

I don't think there is anything specific for this length of stay other than figuring out where the most local classified ads are (Kijiji, Craigslist, something local) and trying to arrange something directly. As far as Airbnb goes, they have a specific site airbnb.com/sublets for this term of stay, advantage of using this over regular search tool is that it ...


4

For Croatia and Romania, it depends on your citizenship and possibly on your country of residence and a few other details but not really on where you are currently travelling from. These two countries are EU member states and they should not stamp EU passports (nor even require EU citizens from travelling with a passport, if they hold an ID card). I guess ...


4

I only have anecdotal evidence for you as a Croat who frequently travels with a foreign non-euro passport through ex-Yugo countries. On some of the land borders the agents get quite lazy and will literally just look at the outside of the passport and wave you through. These guys you can quite easily ask for stamp if they don't automatically do it (mime it if ...


3

JAT Airways is now known as Air Serbia, they are in partnership with Etihad Airways, the national air carrier of the United Arab Emirates. Here their fleet today Btw I've never traveled by airplane so far



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