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No, using a "TSA lock" is not compulsory. That is because there is no U.S. law that mandates the use of such locks. On the contrary, there are situations in which the use of "TSA locks" are actually a violation of the law (49CFR 1540.111), even when a lock is explicitly required by law. The primary example of when NOT to use "TSA locks", is when ...


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The only potentially confusing part of this trip will be your transfer through O'Hare. But there are some ways you can speed this up. You will arrive in Terminal 5 at O'Hare, and you will transfer to your flight to LAX in one of Terminals 1-3. Since you're from a Visa Waiver Program country and you are traveling on an ESTA, you may be eligible to skip the ...


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The flight ORD-LAX will be a internal US flight. What will happen is the following: You leave your plane in Chicago, go through immigration, collect your luggage, go through customs and then leave the secure (airside) area. You then recheck your bag and go through security. This process is usually well described by signs and you just have one way to go ...


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No, using a TSA lock is not mandatory. First, it is not mandatory to use a lock at all. Second, you can use any lock you want but, if the TSA decide to open your bag, they'll just break your lock if it's not one they can open with their master key. Note that they accept no liability for damage to your lock or your bag caused by them forcing a non-TSA lock.


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TSA locks are one step above a rope as far as baggage security is concerned. I have locks on some bags, on all bags I use a coloured cable tie to secure the zipper. They cost 2 cents each at any electronics store and come in enough variety that no baggage thief will have another just like it. The seal is photographed at the check-in counter. A plastic seal ...


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No, using a "TSA lock" is not compulsory. What using one does is enable TSA to physically inspect your luggage, if they so deem it necessary, without cutting your existing lock(s). If you use a "TSA lock", it has been designed to allow TSA to use a master key to open it. Of course, this also means, as you have surmised, that anyone else with a master key ...


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TSA locks are not "mandatory", in the sense that it's perfectly legal & allowed to bring any old suitcase with any old lock into the US. However, if you use a lock that is not TSA compatible, the TSA reserves the right to break it open if they need to check the contents of your bag. The "other places" you describe seem to be more about Customs issues, ...



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