New answers tagged

1

While all the other answers are good, I would like to make the comparison in a more objective way. According to numbeo's safety and crime index, which is crowdsourced by contributors, Prague is a very safe city to visit, with the following score: Level of crime: Low Worries home broken and things stolen: Low Worries being mugged or robbed: Low Safety ...


1

If more than one bike is involved, chain the two bikes together. It doesnt avoid the problem but it eliminates the options of lifting the bike onto a truck.


5

I have a few of these bags, but only use them for beach/swimming stuff. If I were to try and lock one, I would search for a generic backpack security protector. It seems that there are several of these around, e.g. on Amazon: These are sold under the Pacsafe name. There may be other lockable mesh products available. If you are checking in your bag, you ...


3

To add to mts's answer (sorry, I can't comment as I'm new here), if you find a padlock with a small shackle there is no need to cut off the existing clips, just ensure the straps on each side of the clip are squeezed into the shackle. That will stop the clip being casually opened, and won't damage the bag so you can use it inside your rucksac as a 'dry ...


8

One thing you can do is to lock the loops where the plastic clip-lock attaches with a wire-lock as shown in the picture below: Alternatively you could break the plastic clip-lock that you are showing in the picture and replace it with a regular key- or combination-lock (and you can get those even in the TSA-approved variant). Note that a potential thief ...


6

They are normally used for swimming/diving/kayaking/canyoning, as waterproof packaging (although they are a bit more sturdy then). I am not aware of any way to 'lock' them, but why would that be a concern? Backpacks are not lockable either. Checked luggage is not accessible to the public, and if someone working there wants to open your luggage and steal ...


12

Prague is safe, I would say to the European standards. You really don't get people coming to you with a knife and wanting your money, certainly not in touristic areas and not during the day (a bit more to this later). So, most theft comes from people not being careful enough. The standard rules apply that nothing valuable has to be accessible: no wallets in ...


4

New York crime statistics are available at the the NYPD website under Crime Prevention. You'll find city wide statistics and statistics for each precinct— a map of precincts is also available. e.g. An alternative point of view would be a visualation of crime, which are typically found by searching for "mash ups", e.g. NYC Crime Map The site Flowing ...


2

The only other recommendation I have is to delete (uninstall/remove) any banking related apps on the phone before your travel, for 3 reasons: It is not too difficult to retrieve logs generated by apps installed on a phone and I wouldn't completely rely on the banks that they have secured their apps in all possible ways You are likely to access internet via ...


1

Here are a couple of pointers: Don't go by what the print or initially state as ID requirements. Ask to see the manager. Oftentimes there's a lot of discretion the manager has in what to accept as security. It is very likely that they are willing to accept some other form of ID as security outside of what was stated as the default instruction. In most ...


0

Make a hi-fi copy of your passport, say color. Repeat step 1 a few times. Anyone who asks to see your passport ( for ID, collateral purposes ), offer them one of your hi-fi copies, and let them sight ( and not keep ) your original. If that is not good enough for them, do as other answers suggest and take your patronage to more civilized climes. If people ...


6

Everyone has given good advice about the phone and that it will almost undoubtedly be safe if you put a password on it (rather than a short PIN). The only issue that I see is to ensure that access to your email service is encrypted. Almost all are these days, so it's only a concern if you access mail without using SSL. You will see this under Advanced ...


8

Most people that target identify theft are not looking at your cellular phone; they are looking at things that can be used to impersonate you - so your id card, passport, etc. People stealing phones are looking at reselling them for a quick buck. So, if you put a passcode on your phone, it makes it less of a target for being sold on. iPhones in particular ...


8

Unless you need that specific device, I would get a throw-away device to carry in questionable situations. You can get decent Android devices for under $100 US.


19

None, as long as you lock your phone with a password. It took the FBI several weeks of efforts to crack an iPhone belonging to the San Bernardino mass shooter, so a random low-level thief won't have the skills or tools to access your encrypted information. I would worry more about information stolen on your laptop, although that also can be mitigated by ...


36

If you have a sufficiently modern iPhone (eg. anything that runs iOS 9 would be fine), then enable a passcode, set "Require Passcode" to "Immediately" (so you have to enter it every time you open the phone) or something short. The phone's memory is encrypted using a key derived from the passcode. No passcode, no personally identifiable data. If you do this, ...


8

I lived in Korea for four and a half years. While there, I occasionally encountered places that asked for my passport, but I never carried it with me. They always accepted an ID card instead. In general, rules in Korea aren't enforced terribly strictly. Most things are negotiable. If you give a believable reason why you can't provide your passport (can't, ...


8

The sensible thing to do is to take your business elsewhere. I understand the need to hand over the passport. There is no need. Your passport does not belong to you (it belongs to your government), so it is not appropriate for anybody to use it as security against a loan or rental. If an organization insists on using a passport as anything other than ...


3

I wonder whether leaving a passport card would be acceptable. On a recent trip to Jamaica, we flew in so had to use our book passports, but we each also have passport cards, and we had them with us. I'd have hated for the passport card to have been stolen or lost, but even if it had, we'd have still had our book passports, so no issues as far as when we ...


4

As a hack, you could buy an imitation/"novelty" passport (maybe in the name of an imaginary country), which the average bike-rental attendant may not be able to identify, and which doesn't carry any risk to you of being misused. Using such a passport to cross a border or as identification to officials or police is doubtless illegal and a bad idea, but for ...


3

I live in Chile and you are not legally forced to carry your passport anywhere if you stay in Chile. You will need some form of identification though, in case the police wants to see your ID, and the only legal one for foreigners is the passport. What the driver did is illegal. The best advice is to always carry a photocopy of your passport and handle ...


6

Depends on your country, but I usually handle such situations using my official government-issued ID card instead of passport. It's official enough for many places, however still not as useful as passport for eventual criminal activity. And, more importantly, you still keep you passport so you won't risk problems with going back home.


27

Don't use them. It's really that simple. The only people who need to see your passport are immigration and border control, or law enforcement. (ETA: in some jurisdictions, businesses such as hotels or car rental agencies are required by law enforcement to keep a copy of passport details on hand) If you're asked to submit your passport to confirm your ID, ...


2

On a trip to Amsterdam I had the same problem trying to hire a bike and I decided not to handle my passport. If they lose or misplace your passport, you are on your own, in a foreign country without a passport. I would be more in peace of mind if they hold my credit card than my passport, but they would not take it as safeguard so, no bike ride.


31

Do you really have to leave a passport? Would a credit card suffice instead? In Istanbul, to rent an audio guide at many public attractions, they often want you to leave a passport or identity document, or failing that a credit card, as security. This is to encourage you to return the audio equipment at the end of the tour. I haven't actually seen this ...


0

You mean one of those USB batteries? They're not much bigger than an iPhone so no, no problem at all. However, you should not check batteries.


40

You already cover the sensible things that I would also do, especially online reviews and making a copy. Perhaps you could take a photograph of the person you handed it to? If you wish to go further, I have one possible suggestion: I recently bought a bike and took it for a test ride. To do so, I gave them my credit card and driving licence which they put ...


1

When I travel between Ireland and the USA about five times a year, I carry with me in carry-on luggage: A 17" laptop An iPad An Android tablet Two or three mobile phones Cables for the above A USB power block A small power bank (not 16000mAh, though) And I've never had a problem.


7

I've visited Prague twice in the past five years and, as mentioned in another answer on this page, I didn't feel at any greater risk of being robbed in Prague than in other tourist destinations throughout Europe. Rick Steves has written extensively (in his guidebooks and online) about how to avoid pickpockets when visiting Europe, and one of his top ...


4

I'll raise a counterpoint to the other answers. Consider what you would achieve if you returned your passport, driving licence and EHIC card and applied for new ones. The thief would still have a copy of your old, seemingly unexpired, documents. I can't envisage many situations where an authority that would have the ability to check document validity, would ...


11

Prague is no worse than any touristy city, better than some I would say. As always, if it happens to you, the impact can be huge. The risk is the same as at home, but when in a foreign country you will need to sort things out much faster and in a place where you do not speak the local language. Be prepared, do not keep your important papers and cards where ...


6

Lets break it down by order of risk: Credit Card Number - as the person has your name as well (from the other documents) this can be used for online purchases, so I would immediately notify the credit card issuer and block the card. All the person has to do is keep guessing the expiry date; which is easily done in a few tries. Photocopy of passport, driver'...


0

Yes, there is a possibility. (no zero risk in this world); the risk should be low; thieves want to have quick cash instead of having to work hard for it. If that stresses you, contact your credit card company and report your card as stolen; same thing for your passport, contact you embassy/consulate and report your passport stolen. (same thing for other ...


3

All electronic items are allowed except those that are prohibited by the airline; or the country's security rules. These include: Large batteries (see Is it a true that you can't put ordinary Mac laptops (with the battery) in checked luggage? for some details on the capacities). Anything that can be used as a weapon. Electronic items that do not turn ...


0

You are generally allowed to carry power banks and external hard drives with you as carry-on baggage. I had some AA batteries confiscated when I tried to take them with me at Frankfurt. They were for my camera but the officials did not agree. As for other electronic goods, please be more specific so we can let you know from our experiences. Also, this varies ...



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