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4

You can certainly argue for some, both objective and subjective. for exiting in an emergency, aside from sitting in the exit row, aisle seats > middle seats > window seats for ease to escape for exiting the plane, it's faster than a window seat in the same row if you want to be 'that guy', on airlines like RyanAir where it's sit where you want seating, ...


5

You have the moral advantage when fighting for the armrest. The person on the aisle or window has at least one uncontested armrest already. There's a slightly higher chance that the seat in front of you and/or behind you will be unoccupied. If in front, you don't have to worry about them putting their chair back. If behind, then you don't have to worry ...


2

The only advantage I can think of is the opportunity to have two neighbors to talk to. This can also be a disadvantage if you're particularly anti-social, or you end up with bad neighbors. Which I guess goes to show why this question really is "Primarily Opinion Based."


3

It is impossible for anyone to accurately answer the question without seeing your mother. The rules are based on how well she fits in the seat in question and whether the seat belt fits her. United rules are spelled out on: http://www.united.com/web/en-US/content/travel/specialneeds/customersize/default.aspx But the two biggest factors, can she fit into ...


1

No, when you book a ticket from point A to B then you have the right to travel only from A to B. That is because you pay only for the journey from A to B and not O to T. If there are other passengers who book tickets from O to A or B to A, the same seat might be allotted to them for those legs of the journey. In case there are no bookings for those legs, ...


0

You'll be allowed to take the seat at Ratlam. When the reservation chart will be generated, you will be listed as passenger boarding from a different station than the starting point. Someone else might be at your set from Jaipur to Ratlam. TTE has the reservation chart which has all the information about passengers boarding from non-starting point ...


9

I live in Japan and every day commute with trains and metro. And can assure you that nobody will think you are rude by offering the seat. From my personal experience: I have a rule to always give up my seat to Disabled/injured people Pregnant women (in Japan they wear a badge like this ...


2

That is most likely true in most situations. However, the general idea is to give up your seat to someone else that may need it more than you such has pregnant women and older people. Also, there are certain sections in the train that are reserved for those people. If the train is too crowded then you may face a situation where those people cannot get to ...


10

I give my seat pretty often in Tokyo. I can tell that it is never rude. On the contrary they are very grateful, so much that usually I prefer to keep a distance afterwards. Also sometimes they won't accept it to avoid bothering you, so I insists and say that I will get off soon anyway.



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