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43

I have never before noticed this, but a quick check over several airlines at Seatguru confirmed that other airlines do that as well. The logic behind this is that the letters A and K will always be window seats. The letter K is chosen, because it's the highest that you can go in a normal airplane with 10 seats across (An A380 for instance). I is omitted ...


31

No, you do not have any right to stop the person in front from reclining, and yes, it's childish behaviour on your part to try to stop them. Everybody on a plane has the right to recline their own seat, and flight attendants can and will enforce this if asked. You put "rest" in quotation marks, but maybe they really do need to recline: they might be sick, ...


27

The reason why airlines implement a policy of asking overweight people to get two seats is an air safety issue of whether they can be strapped in properly. The guideline used for this is whether a passenger can fit between the armrests. If a passenger requires two seats, then the policy differs from airline-to-airline if/what the passenger should be charged ...


23

The wait list system for Indian train tickets is simply a case of supply and demand - there's so many people wanting to travel and only so many seats to go around. So there are three 'booking statuses' which may be specified when you book a train ticket: Reserved / confirmed: The booking is confirmed and a seat has been set aside for you. Note that the ...


21

Firstly, good on you for being concerned about her and asking about it on a public forum where others who may not be able to can hopefully benefit from this as well. I hope you come back with your findings from the airlines/trips they take! Basically, it comes down to the airline. You can see what their policy is by looking up their Conditions of ...


20

I am 6'3" and pushing 400 pounds and I have never had a problem on BA flights. Yes I need a seatbelt extension but only so I will be comfortable. I admittedly do fit between the armrests. I do feel bad for people next to me because my shoulders are quite broad but I try to get an aisle seat so I can at least lean out. Since your mother is travelling with ...


19

This question is hard to answer, there are many types of crashes. If the plane stalled most likely it will fall down on its aft side. If the plane spins then god knows! and if the plane splits into pieces while air borne then no one is safe! Let's talk about normal crash landing where the pilot is forced to land the plane in a desert or a field or any ...


18

An important factor is that seats closer to an exit improve your chances after a crash landing, in case the plane catches fire (very common) or sinks underwater. Contradicting the Popular Mechanics study, the University of Greenwich found that A seat up to five rows from an exit offers a better than even chance of escaping if there's a fire, ...


17

A non-exit row window seat is just like any other normal seat, except with a view. You have no additional requirements to sit in that seat. The individuals who sit in the exit row have additional responsibilities. They're required to receive a briefing beforehand from the attendant, who will explain what they will be required to do in an emergency ...


16

From a former cabin crew's point of view, there are two issues here: 1. Waking the passengers up: This is done for two reasons actually: Safety reason: It is a good practice for the airlines to wake passengers up whenever possible, the real reason behind that is checking if the passenger is ok or not. Many cases of very sick passengers (incapacitated) ...


16

You do not have much options, but you can always try one of the following: Simply move to an empty seat: After boarding is done and doors are closed, move to any empty seat within the same class. Flight attendants will not mind. Ask other passengers to swap: Be smart and ask people who are not with family or friends so it will not be a problem for them to ...


16

There's several conditions you'll have to meet to sit in an exit row, such as being in good health. If you meet those, I don't think you have to worry. In the case of an emergency, you'd have to assess the situation outside before opening the window and throwing it out of the plane. You'll be briefed by the flight attendant, so don't worry if you don't ...


15

There is an article regarding this subject in AirSpace Magazine. The basic reason is safety in case of a crash or other impact: Seat in the upright position is locked and doesn't present an issue if there is an impact During the FAA research back in 1988 it was found that bracing in the upright position is safer then in reclined. Reclined seats make it ...


15

On long haul flights there are often seats reserved for crew rest. One crew works 5 hours or so then changes clothes and goes to those seats to eat, read, gossip and possibly sleep. The other crew, who was in those seats, changes and takes over duties. They use the very back row because it's close to where working crew hang out during the flight anyway. ...


13

There's really two different issues here - that of pre-selecting seats, and that of how check-in works with multi-airline itineraries. As far as pre-selecting seats, every airline has different policies. Specifically for SAS, they allow you to pre-select seats only if you has elite status with their frequent flyer program (Eurobonus Gold), or on flights ...


13

I think the diagram you posted is misleading, I am a qualified cabin crew for 777-300 and all other variations of 777, the last seat in the diagram shows an empty space in the middle which I think is not correct. Out of experience these seats which are located at the end of the aircraft next to the L5 door (71+72 A+C) have limited space due to the shape of ...


12

The answer depends on the number of people travelling with you and the age of the infant. If you have an extra seat for your infant, you are required to bring your child seat that you use in your car on board. This results in even more baggage. Also you can only be sitting at certain rows, since an additional oxygen mask is required. If your child is still ...


12

So, there are two mechanical solutions to, what is, fundamentally social problem, but before I provide them, I want to make clear that employing these is an easy way to be regarded as a jerk by your fellow passengers, and not without merit; the seat is designed to recline, and while putting it back can be inconsiderate, restricting the use of the feature by ...


11

The airline can move passengers around, even if they have chosen seats (you'll always see the disclaimer when you choose a seat online) - whereas the online booking system won't necessarily know if it can do this. Also, the airline may have more up to date knowledge of cancellations at that stage. So the problem isn't the airline making it look like there ...


10

It's more likely that there was a problem with the seat. This could be, but is not limited to (and I've seen all of these): malfunctioning/broken seatbelt. seat stuck in the reclined position. loose screw in seat broken component in seat support structure As such, until they get a chance to service it, they move you. Presumably because of the different ...


10

If you are flying economy If you have a baby flying with you: Take the first row of the zone you are setting in. First rows are usually where the fittings for the baby basinets are available. Also, you will be close to toilets to change diapers and so. If you are travelling with kids: Take a side of a row next to the window at the beginning or end of a ...


8

Some more info on top of what @MeNoTalk said: It mostly depends how full the airplane is and why you want to switch. If the airplane is rather empty, there is no issue, you do not need a reason and you can switch as you like. If it is full, it depends how personal the reason is and if another (higher or lower) class is still free or if it is acceptable to ...


8

This is a US term meaning that seats are not pre-booked but grabbed on a first-come first-served basis. The term originated with Southwest Airlines, which was the first airline to eschew seat assignments at booking or confirmation time (or at least the first well-known airline in the US). Here's an early use of the term from 2001: The "cattle-call" ...


8

You might not have a seat. In European trains, the seat reservation is independent from the train pass. Some trains require a seat reservation (TGVs in France) but not all. In German countries (at least Germany and Austria) it is possible to buy a train ticket and then a seat ticket. You can also buy it anytime (as long as there are seats left) and the ...


8

I don't understand what "logic" has to do with it. Placing a hold means that no one else can book the seat for the period of the hold. It is a short-term reservation. So if there are five remaining seats on a flight and you place a hold on one, the airline can only sell or reserve four. After 24 hours or whatever the hold is, you lose your privilege and the ...


8

This is not something I have done personally but I recently sat on a 13 hour flight next to a family that had 2 children. One was under the age of 2 years old and the other I'd say was 3-4. Our seats were at the very front of the section so we had a little extra leg room and no one sat in front of us. This allowed the family to put blankets down on the ...


8

Mark's answer is kinda perfect, but I will give some extra information as a cabin crew member: The bad: Lavatory noise (flushing noise is so loud due to air suction) Babies noise, the bulkhead behind almost all lavatories are where baby basinets installed. People with babies usually reserve these seats. Crowd (queues) You can't recline the seat enough (if ...


8

Lifehacker actually has a post about ways to find out which seats are actually non-reclining, so that you can try and book the seats behind them. A similar article of theirs shows the (meaner) option of blocking the seat with something like a water bottle. (from gawkerassets) There's the aforementioned Knee Defender, as well, but that's where you start ...


7

It varies for different airlines, so it's best to telephone your individual airline or check their website. It seems to be standard for international flights but not so for domestic flights. These depend on the model of plane and some airlines also have a weight limit for allowing a child to use the bassinets. Check with your airline to determine if your ...



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