Hot answers tagged

115

"Sir/Ma'am, no thank you." or "Sir/Ma'am, I am not interested." Followed by (if needed) "Sir/Ma'am, I am sorry, but I specifically requested and was given this seat. I am not willing to change to another seat for any reason. Perhaps someone else might wish to help you."


85

This is not prohibited. Technically, you should do it while wearing your seat belt, but I've never seen this enforced except during takeoff and landing, or during turbulence. Last year I was on a Delta flight from Atlanta to London during a severe winter storm, in which almost all passengers missed their flight (due to cancelled inbound flights, or road ...


73

The other answers are excellent, and correct. I wanted to share a few extra ideas because you specifically said: Do note that I am very shy and submissive in public. I also am a shy person that's, for various reasons, done a lot of travelling on my own. What I always say to myself is: You'll never see any of these people ever again. And that ...


64

First time I've heard of this, and I think it's nonsense. There is a strong social convention that people should give up their seats (not just the designated priority seats) for elders, very young kids, the disabled/injured and pregnant. Nobody will be offended or think you rude for doing that. They might call you out if you don't. The recipient most likely ...


55

No, you do not have any right to stop the person in front from reclining, and yes, it's childish behaviour on your part to try to stop them. Everybody on a plane has the right to recline their own seat, and flight attendants can and will enforce this if asked. You put "rest" in quotation marks, but maybe they really do need to recline: they might be sick, ...


49

I have never before noticed this, but a quick check over several airlines at Seatguru confirmed that other airlines do that as well. The logic behind this is that the letters A and K will always be window seats. The letter K is chosen, because it's the highest that you can go in a normal airplane with 10 seats across (An A380 for instance). I is omitted ...


42

It is not a pleasant situation for both of them - the passenger or the large passenger. It is very uncomfortable for the passenger and totally embarrassing for the large guy. In addition to that, it is uncomfortable and embarrassing for the staff. Unfortunately, there is no one single rule that applies here; each airline has its own policy regarding this. ...


39

Unless it is a safety related reason, it will be very hard to change your seat without you willing to do so, that includes cabin crew. So, as mentioned in the other answer by @CGCampbell, just politely say no. You might get frowned upon but who cares! it is your seat and it is totally your right to be stuck with it. Something worth mentioning here, ...


37

I live in Japan (Tokyo) and no one gives up their bus or train seats unless the standing person is clearly incapable of standing for long (old, injured, pregnant). Then they are fairly good about it. What's really entertaining is watching two elderly people with canes / walkers etc. arguing about which one of them need the seat more. And it's the "good" ...


33

The reason why airlines implement a policy of asking overweight people to get two seats is an air safety issue of whether they can be strapped in properly. The guideline used for this is whether a passenger can fit between the armrests. If a passenger requires two seats, then the policy differs from airline-to-airline if/what the passenger should be charged ...


32

There are many things that airlines used to do that they can no longer do because customers have so much more information than before. 30 years ago, what people presented themselves as doing pretty well matched with what they were doing. But over the years, folks have learned (and shared with others) how pretending can save a lot of money: one way ticket ...


30

Get a Window Seat When I reserve a seat on train (or a plane, for that matter), knowing that I would like to sleep during the journey, I often book a window seat. That way I can lean my head on the window, rather than having it hanging in the void, causing me to wake up every ten minutes as soon as the neck ache kicks in. Moreover I place a ...


29

Firstly, good on you for being concerned about her and asking about it on a public forum where others who may not be able to can hopefully benefit from this as well. I hope you come back with your findings from the airlines/trips they take! Basically, it comes down to the airline. You can see what their policy is by looking up their Conditions of ...


29

There's no definitive answer to this and it will vary by country and airline. This is what the UK Civil Aviation Authority says: http://www.caa.co.uk/default.aspx?catid=2207&pageid=12706 From a safety point of view children (it doesn't specify an age) SHOULD be seated CLOSE to their parent/guardian. The reasons are many but if you imagine a ...


28

The wait list system for Indian train tickets is simply a case of supply and demand - there's so many people wanting to travel and only so many seats to go around. So there are three 'booking statuses' which may be specified when you book a train ticket: Reserved / confirmed: The booking is confirmed and a seat has been set aside for you. Note that the ...


28

Such a list would not be meaningful. All airlines have wide rules to prohibit "tampering" with seats, with Knee Defenders or otherwise; you can improvise one with a well-sized bottle, after all. Those that point out the Knee Defender as banned are only making it explicit that this specific device is not allowed. More to the point, if the passenger unable ...


28

I live in Japan and every day commute with trains and metro. And can assure you that nobody will think you are rude by offering the seat. From my personal experience: I have a rule to always give up my seat to Disabled/injured people Pregnant women (in Japan they wear a badge like this ...


27

This was a publicity stunt by Ryanair. No such product exists and it is dubious it would be approved as safe by the Civil Aviation Authority. It's worth noting that Ryanair and Easyjet are already close to the maximum number of people they can allow on board based on the size of the emergency exits on the aircraft they use. Therefore this product would not ...


26

I am 6'3" and pushing 400 pounds and I have never had a problem on BA flights. Yes I need a seatbelt extension but only so I will be comfortable. I admittedly do fit between the armrests. I do feel bad for people next to me because my shoulders are quite broad but I try to get an aisle seat so I can at least lean out. Since your mother is travelling with ...


26

Any person above 2 years must have a seat, but where is that seat? that's something left for common sense and not covered by any policy I am aware of. Seating policies usually go like "every effort must be made to ensure that families are seated next to each other" and that's it, and as we know, as long as that "effort" costs money, then airlines might ...


25

An important factor is that seats closer to an exit improve your chances after a crash landing, in case the plane catches fire (very common) or sinks underwater. Contradicting the Popular Mechanics study, the University of Greenwich found that A seat up to five rows from an exit offers a better than even chance of escaping if there's a fire, ...


24

"I'm sorry but I'd rather not trade seats." If they insist; "No, I am not going to be changing seats, I'm sorry."


23

This question is hard to answer, there are many types of crashes. If the plane stalled most likely it will fall down on its tail. If the plane spins then God knows! and if the plane splits into pieces while air borne then no one is safe! Let's talk about normal crash landing where the pilot is forced to land the plane in a desert or a field or any other ...


22

From a former cabin crew's point of view, there are two issues here: 1. Waking the passengers up: This is done for two reasons actually: Safety reason: It is a good practice for the airlines to wake passengers up whenever possible, the real reason behind that is checking if the passenger is ok or not. Many cases of very sick passengers (incapacitated) ...


22

You do not have much options, but you can always try one of the following: Simply move to an empty seat: After boarding is done and doors are closed, move to any empty seat within the same class. Flight attendants will not mind. Ask other passengers to swap: Be smart and ask people who are not with family or friends so it will not be a problem for them to ...


22

It would appear not, but there's nothing stopping us from creating one. People can edit the answer as we find more. Airlines that ban the Knee Defender Air Canada source American Airlines source Continental Airlines source Delta Airlines source Jetstar source Qantas source Southwest Airlines source United Airlines source Jetstar source Virgin Australia ...


22

If you are very shy and have a lot of difficulty dealing with people directly, a very simple strategy is to lean back in your seat with your eyes closed and wearing headphones or earplugs until after takeoff. Most people will not disturb you while you're like this. I realize this isn't a direct answer to the question "how do I tell them no", but it might ...


22

You absolutely should never, ever swap seats with anyone. Here's a clever formula for you: say.. "I am not allowed to do that. Please bring one of the cabin crew. I want to speak to one of the cabin crew about it. I'm calling for the cabin crew. I've pressed the button." Whatever the prick says back to you, just keep repeating louder and louder, "I want ...


20

The issue is that in order to give you a specific seat, they need it to be free. If the better seats are already given away, normally the people who have received a seat have this printed on their (e-) tickets. Moving someone away from their seat because you want it is very tricky. So the best strategy would be to get a better seat in the first place ...


20

As a cabin crew member, we actually have no instructions against it as long as the seatbelt signs are turned off. The passengers seating policy is clear, seated while take off and landing, seat in upright position and seatbelt is fastened. During flights, the recommendations are to keep the seatbelt fastened to be prepared in case of sudden turbulence. ...



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