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42

Travelling by cargo ship (mostly container but also bulk or ro-ro, never heard anything about travelling on a tanker, presumably for safety reasons) is totally a thing. More info and links to specific agents can be found in previous questions tagged “freighter travel”. Many websites advertise specific journeys but you can always contact an agent and see what ...


30

As owner of a yacht there is no problem. I have been in contact with Bobby Schenk, a well-known German open-sea sailor who writes about problems on board, in your case firearms. As owner of your boat the relevant law for possessing and storing weapons is your country of origin, in your case USA, more specifically your state law. I suppose you have all ...


26

Yes, ships sink. Someone already mentioned the Costa Concordia sinking; ferries sink a fair amount as well (for instance, a South Korean ferry sank last year with the loss of almost 300 lives. On June 1 of this year, a ferry in China sank with the loss of at least 440 lives. In addition to deaths from sinking, there are also deaths from maritime collisions, ...


25

It's possible to travel on cargo ships, though I'm not sure how practical it is. There are certainly container ships sailing backwards and forwards between the west coast of the US and Japan (and China and other parts of east Asia). See, for example, this question.


21

Many cruise lines offer transpacific routes. Here is one I found via Google (cruise Vancouver Japan) link If you want to travel regularly, this would not be the best option due to the limited number of ships making that route, but for a one-time trip, it seems reasonable.


20

A friend did something similar, where he kayaked from Vancouver, Canada to Alaska. Turns out you need to report in the same day you arrive. He was tired and slept that night, and the next day went to check in. Naturally there was a) no record of him leaving Canada and b) he'd been on US soil for 24 hours as an illegal alien. They sent him packing and ...


18

There is a relatively simple and cheap option for those who don't want the rigours of a freighter and don't have the skills to crew a yacht. That is to take a repositioning cruise on a normal cruise liner. These get sold off very cheap, since it's basically fifteen days on a cruise ship without stopping at the interesting islands and tourist spots that ...


18

Besides marinas there are several websites/forums you can search: Sailnet Cruisers Forum There are also “professional” websites that list ads like: Crew Seekers Find a crew Some of the websites require that you pay a fee. Anyway, as I commented before you may be required to have skills. Nevertheless make sure that the crew (and the captain) are also ...


17

I am assuming you don't have much experience at sea by the question. First of all, be careful. I strongly suggest you read @TimLymington before mine. The duration of a crossing depends of your boat and luck with the weather. You can be lucky and get a nice 20 Knots wind, or unlucky having 0 Knots or worse 30 knots or above. You should check the dominant ...


16

You can, but the travel is a bit on the unconventional side. Most shipping companies will accept passengers at a relatively cheap rate and you can just tag along. I live in Manila, my father in law runs one such company, my brother in law is a cook for another. There are some caveats: You're surrounded by 'salty sailors', which may or may not be ...


16

I have written an article about seasickness, so I will give a resume. Seasickness has nothing to do with willpower. If someone accuses you of that, tell him that Horatio Nelson and Shackleton on the "James Caird" were both seasick. The exact cause of seasickness is still unknown. The "frame of reference" theory has the flaw that blind people can get ...


14

Nothing and nobody can justifiably stop you heading to international waters. ( The freedom of the seas) However, that's only half the story: afterwards, you will have to enter somebody's territorial waters (unless you plan to stay at sea forever to avoid taxes; some very rich people have plans to do just that). When you do, you will need visas, customs ...


14

Familiarity can certainly reduce the likelihood of sea sickness, as your body can get used to it. The usual problem is the swell - which you just don't get on lakes. Out on the ocean you have no stationary frame of reference so your brain starts to believe the boat is stationary. As it is actually moving, this confuses your brain and causes sickness. ...


13

Generally No. Again this depends completely on the marriage laws of your home country and possibly also the ship's home country. But according to this (German) article, most countries do not allow this. It even mentions a number of regulations (by the US Navy, the state of New York, and the British merchant navy) that explicitly disallow it. It also ...


13

I think you need to radio the authorities when you near the port and they will give you instructions. They will either send a boat to meet you or tell you where to dock. Before leaving your home country, you should be in touch with the embassy or consulate of each country you plan to visit to obtain any necessary visas and also to ask about their policy on ...


13

My father did Liverpool - Azores - Halifax in a 26 foot wooden sailboat (a Thames Bawley, mahogany) in 1984 with a total crew of 3. Liverpool - Azores took 17 days; Azores - Halifax took 21. (They spent a week in the Azores resupplying and changing some of the crew since taking 6 weeks vacation to be part of something like this is quite a challenge.) BTW he ...


12

Your sailing boat (assuming it is properly registered) has the same rights and responsibilities as any other ship, up to and including a cruise liner or supertanker. As long as you fly a yellow Q flag when you enter territorial waters and keep it flying for a reasonable period, it's up to Customs to come and inspect your boat and papers. If you are passing ...


12

There are probably no (ordinary) ferries going to Israel. You can find more information on the Seat 61 Israel page. I quote from the overland to Israel section: However, as at January 2010, both Poseidon Lines and Salamis Lines' Piraeus-Cyprus-Israel ferry services remain suspended because of the political situation in Israel, and they show no sign of ...


12

Your best bet is to sign up to a crew-finding website like findacrew.net. A friend who cycled from London to New Zealand did this for the ocean parts - hung out in port and used the site. What was observed is that there are different levels of opportunities. Some berths require that you have licenses or sailing experience, or a particular skill (eg ...


11

This one leaves from Boston and makes a couple of stops in Iceland, one of which is at Heimaey where they famously fought a volcano and won. It also stops in Greenland and Scotland. This cruise also visits Iceland. Both of those cruises only let you off the boat to explore for 8 hours at a time (there are no overnight on-land stays), which I have to say ...


11

There are ferries between at least these points, China on the left, Japan on the right: Qingdao - Shimonoseki Tianjin - Kobe Shanghai - Osaka Shanghai - Kobe Suzhou - Shimonoseki Here's some other links with overviews and details: Seat 61 Lonely Planet Thorn Tree Randy's Japan Page Shanghai Ferry Boat "Xin Jian Zhen" Overview of Japanese Ferries Oh ...


11

OK, so my friend - Kylie Phaup-Stephens, has a blog on bugbitten. Over the period of 20 months from ANZAC Day(25th of April) 2009 to the end of 2010, she cycled from London, UK to Christchurch, NZ. Naturally, she had to use water methods at some point. She struggled for a while to find a boat to Aus - and a visa (a legacy law means that even Kiwis need a ...


11

Island Trader will take you there, just contact the company, it's about a fifth of the price of a flight.. however, it is a rough trip, at least 36 hours or more, the boat rocks around a lot so if you get sea sick I would not recommend! The other problem is that the boat leaves every fortnight, so it's not very frequent, usually on a Wednesday or Thursday ...


11

There are currently no ferry services running between Sri Lanka and India. There have been various proposals (some of which even started running for a short while in 2011, 2012 and 2015) but none of them have lasted. Your best bet is probably to fly from Tiruchirappalli Airport (roughly in the middle of your first screenshot) to Colombo. Sri Lankan fly twice ...


10

It's hard, but possible. I think the best answer for me aside from giving links is to just link to you my friend's blog - she cycled from London to New Zealand, and took boats between the land masses. It took her four months of searching to find a boat from East Timor to Australia, but you'll be better off reading about it on her blog, and potentially even ...


10

It might actually be dangerous to answer this question. It sounds innocuous, like "How long would it take me to drive from New York to San Francisco?", but any answer to that question can assume that the driver knows how to cross mountain ranges and deserts safely, and that if the car breaks down it can be fixed by a mechanic. Telling somebody who doesn't ...


10

The two main options that I am aware of are: The Queen Mary 2, the only regular transatlantic passenger line, Freighter travel, which is not cheap either. I would not be surprised if you could join a crew aboard a luxury yacht in Monaco going to the Caribean for the winter. For example, Cruisers forum has a Crew wanted section. In that case, you get ...


10

The answer will vary a bit depending on whether you are simply interested in going from port to port, or if you have specific destinations in mind. RTW by Ocean Liner Many passenger lines have vessels that operate around the world or close to it, on a set itinerary, and a web search for "around the world cruise" will turn up options from Cunard, P&O, ...


10

First the general route to get to Europe over South America with sails: You start at the East or North Coast, move over the West Indies, go north to the USA, move northeast with the Gulf Stream and if you get far enough to the north, you have wind from the west and you can cross the Atlantic. Now you are in Chile and this is really the absolutely worst ...



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