Hot answers tagged

91

I'm English and lived in Glasgow for 4 years. Understanding many (but certainly not all) people will be tricky (even us native speakers struggle), but they'll be very willing to try to help you understand, and it won't cause offence. You probably won't even need to explain: as soon as they see look of blank incomprehension and hear you begin to say "Err, ...


59

This is a personal experience answer. I am Dutch, so maybe a bit more blunt than you, but my solution works well. I had that same problem last summer. I had arrived in Edinburgh one day, went to visit Glasgow the next and the first person talking to me was hard to understand. I explained to the woman that English is not my first language and I had not ...


29

For London-Perth it looks like you'll have little more than around 5 minutes, from looking at the details. [Update: a link in Andrew's comment seems to confirm 3 minutes]. The excellent Seat61 gives heaps of info on the practicalities of train travel, and has a detailed guide to the Caledonian Sleeper. It confirms: That the segment of the train that goes ...


12

Source: I've been on the sleeper myself a number of times, usually between London and Dundee, which is on the Perth/Aberdeen route. It very much depends where you're getting off. If you're getting off at an intermediate station, then you will need to be prepared to get off as soon as the train arrives. It stays at each station no longer than any normal ...


12

I'm English myself, but ive grown up with Scottish people and have a few friends I still communicate with on a daily basis. I also now live in America and I have a heavy accent so its sort of the same thing. This is my experience with this matter: One thing that most people prefer is honesty. If you're having trouble understanding what someone is saying, ...


9

For established long distance routes, you can find them on Scotland's Great Trails. These are waymarked long-distance routes, that you may be able to get special maps covering the route. There's also a slightly better overview map at WalkHighlands. Most of these long-distance routes however delibeatley avoid unnecissarily summiting however, which conflicts ...


8

The short answer is that paths are rarely marked well, and it is generally necessary to have a map and to know how to read it. Scotland has a long-established right to roam, meaning you can walk anywhere as long as you avoid cultivated land, gardens, and area immediately around buildings. That's great for hikers, but the flip side is that there are few ...


8

It depends what you mean by ocean. You can see the Firth of Forth from the New Town. Portobello, formerly a beach resort, is a few miles from the centre of town. If you want to go a bit further, take the A1 (or train) south towards England for some spectacular North Sea coast views.


7

For small gas cylinders for camping stoves, the main question is the fitting on the top. They all contain a similar sort of fuel, usually a mixture of butane and propane. Some may have different proportions of these, but it doesn't make much difference, except in really cold conditions. Probably the best and most common type is the resealable, screwthread ...


7

The Portuguese system works a bit differently... All visa applications lodged in the UK need to made online at their Application Portal. As part of the procedure you will have the opportunity to schedule your appointment request and the site will tell you which locations and dates are available. Edinburgh, being an honorary consulate, does not have the ...


5

The North Link Ferries site has a Shetland Ponies page which says: As you travel through Shetland, you will see lots of ponies grazing by the roadside or on the heathery hills, appearing to roam wild. These apparently wild ponies are all owned by local crofters. Ponies can be seen in the West Mainland, Tingwall, Dunrossness and the island of Unst. ...


5

Edinburgh is situated on the south bank of the forth estuary so is borderline river/ocean (where does a river end and an ocean start?) Local to Edinburgh is the suburb of Leith which in my opinion is a very pleasant day trip, although remnants of industry still exists. Heading east and south from Edinburgh on the A1 heading towards England there are ...


4

Here's a fly through of the mountain track (sometimes known as the tourist route) on youtube. If you watch the brief video or any of the other real life videos of the hike, it should reassure your friends that there is nothing to fear.


4

If you stick to the Mountain track which starts from near the visitor centre you should be fine. There aren't any steep drops(didn't see one when I last climbed in August 2011) per se but there are drops nonetheless. But most of the drops are before the halfway mark. After the halfway mark it is more or less like a zig zag way winding up the mountain.


4

I'm not aware of anywhere that you're specifically more likely to see weasels (outside of zoos and wildlife parks), but there's a load of hill and paths you can go on with a chance of seeing them. In Scotland you can pretty much go anywhere (apart from people's gardens) but I'd recommend sticking to established paths (there are loads of these all over the ...


4

I did this trip from the center of Edinburgh about a year ago. If someone with more local knowledge comes along with improvements, that would be appreciated. You'll need to get from the airport to the train station, either Edinburgh Waverly (the main train station) or Edinburgh Haymarket (slightly closer to the airport). You can do this with the Airlink ...


4

I've emailed the Portuguese consulate in Manchester and received the following reply: The Consulate General of Portugal in Manchester jurisdiction areas are: East Midlands — Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, Rutland and Northamptonshire, Lincolnshire West Midlands — Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Warwickshire, Shropshire ...


4

Apparently, I have to apply for the visa at Manchester as I'm living in Scotland. I am sure about it now as they (i.e. the London office) refused to receive my application based on my address. Even though they have an online book system, it allowed me to select either Manchester or London office regardless my address, but when I went to the London office, ...


4

I am now back from Shetland and wanted to write up my own answer to provide some first hand experience for whoever else wants to go see some Shetland ponies. As it turns out (and as the other answer correctly stated), it is really not hard at all to find them. We found some already before arriving on Unst while driving towards the ferry on Yell. On Unst ...


3

According to http://driveeuropenews.com/2015/01/21/sweden-21/ The final UK-Scandinavia ferry service, operated by DFDS between Harwich and Esbjerg, Denmark, was withdrawn last September And the start of services – likely between Newcastle, Bergen and Stavanger – the following March So 2016 March might just see the resumption of ferry service ...


3

From personal experience I can say that asking politely to repeat what they just said helps the most. "Beg your pardon?", or "I'm sorry, what?" or "I'm terribly sorry, but I didn't understand you" all worked very well for me. I never had the feeling that I offended the speaker.


3

There are more than 3000 events in a wide variety of categories happening this year. You can find details and book tickets at the official website. Tickets are per-event, but you can expect an amount of free entertainment on the streets of Edinburgh, in particular along the Royal Mile.


3

North Berwick is a nice wee town. Its easy to get to from Edinburgh, about half an hour on the train. Or a bit longer by car, depending on where in Edinburgh you are starting from. If you are interested in wildlife, North Berwick is home to the Scottish Seabird Centre. To experience more of the ocean, you could take a boat trip. These include regular ...


3

There aren't any direct buses or trains from Edinburgh Airport to Dundee. Any journeys will involve at least one change somewhere. For travelling by bus, the quickest and cheapest option would probably be via Halbeath park and ride, near Dunfermline. This is doable in about 1 hour 40 minutes, depending on what time of day. From Edinburgh Airport, take the ...


3

The Citylink M92 route has one at 4:15 (1615) from Edinburgh Bus Stn St Andrews Sq to Dundee Seagate Bus Station Arr and then next stop at Dundee Seagate Bus Station Dep that has very few stops in between. However this is not from the Airport bus stop itself and you will have to travel to the St Andrews Square bus station. You can take the 747 bus from the ...


3

Most places will stock some form of Butane/Propane mix, either Campingaz or a similar fuel from another supplier. You should be able to pick up the small disposable canisters from most outdoors shops, most petrol stations, and some other stores. Larger places should also be able to do you a replacement big refillable canister. When people in the UK talk ...


2

Statistics show that the highest risk age group is the under 25's, and insurers work directly from statistics. The hire cost will be factored directly from type of car and insurance costs. All the majors and most of the small ones will do this - it's simple and easy for them. If you hunt around, you should be able to find a small insurer who will take into ...


1

There's nothing on the site to indicate the existence of any "offical" shops or what have you. As such< I can only presume that availability of gas for stoves will be from the stores located on the various campsites you can use en route, and any other outdoor shops you may encounter along the way. Last time I stopped by any such place, gas from either ...


1

I would recommend a trip to the village of St Abbs. It has a lovely little harbour, nice food options and a nice rocky bit of coastline. Takes about an hour to get there by car from Edinburgh. Dunbar (along the route) is also pleasant.



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