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If you have a Schengen type C multi-entry visa then you can. You can also find the information below at http://www.schengenvisainfo.com/schengen-visa-types/ Copy paste (highlight by me): Single-entry visa allows its holder to enter a Schengen country only once for the certain period of time. Once you leave the certain Schengen country you entered the ...


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According to the information provided in the comments, your plan is to visit Greece, Albania, and Macedonia on a single trip. While a multi-entree type C Schengen visa seems to be sufficient for entry into Albania and Macedonia, note that this is a special case. Macedonia and Albania are independent from the Schengen area, and it is thus their choice whom ...


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I can't predict exactly how a consulate will look at it but getting an extension is certainly not a valid ground for refusal. As they are quite hard to get and imply that you had a very good reason for not leaving and were proactive about informing the authorities, I would not worry.


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As per German visa regulations published by the German foreign office says (scroll down the link): As a result of Regulation 265/2010 it is now possible for anyone in possession of a national visa (D visa) and a valid travel document to move freely in the Schengen area up to three months in any six‑month period. ...


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UK Council for International Student Affairs addresses this very question: If you are not a European Economic Area national and want to travel to Europe, you may be required to apply for a Schengen visa before you travel. Given the fact that you require a Schengen visa to enter the area you will need to get one. The UK student visa doesn't entitle you ...


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The top story on https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/permalink/post/17975501 is about someone overstaying by 4 days, paying a fine and then two days later entering a few days later without problems. If your story is correct and you were let go with just paying a fine and you were not deported then you should be fine. If, on the hand, you got the giant ...


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The HKSAR passport allows 90 days stay in Croatia, as per the HK Immigration website: http://www.immd.gov.hk/eng/service/travel_document/visa_free_access.html Please also refer to this document for information specific to countries: http://www.immd.gov.hk/pdf/Full_List_of_Visa-free_Access_or_Visa-on-arrival_for_HKSAR_Passport_en.pdf


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Staying in Croatia does indeed not count towards your Schengen stay. Official source: Stays in Bulgaria, Croatia, Ireland, Romania, Cyprus and the United Kingdom shall not be taken into account as they are not (yet) part of the Schengen area without internal borders. Croatia has its own 90 out of 180 rule, as can be read on this website of their ...


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It's possible but very tight. It's also possible that your application will take longer, either because there is something about it that requires extra verifications or simply because it's the holiday period. The Migration Agency (the authority responsible for this in Sweden) aims for a two-week turnaround time but obviously warns that it can take longer. ...


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I think you can visit Istanbul either on the way to schengen but please check as different rules exist for citizens of different nationalities. Just apply here: https://www.evisa.gov.tr/en/ (pay them and see if you are issued a visa) I just arrived from Turkey and entered using e-visa 2 days ago. I am indian, holding schengen residence permit. This is what ...


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The official website includes the following information: Egypt: Official passport holders are exempted from visa for their travels up to 90 days. Ordinary passport holders are required to have visa to enter Turkey. Ordinary passport holders may obtain their 30-day single-entry e-Visas via www.evisa.gov.tr, provided that they have a valid Schengen or ...


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You can always apply. There is no specific delay between applications in the UK or Schengen area (even to the same country, let alone to different countries) and no automatic ban or anything like that following a mere refusal. However, you may want to be careful to address the problem raised in the UK visa refusal because, even though some of the rules and ...


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You don't require any additional visa, as Switzerland is a schengen country itself - while not a member of the EU, it is a part of Schengen (and several other EU-related agreements). If you wish to drive on a motorway/autoroute however, you will need a pass/sticker affixed to your car, called a Vignette. This can apparently be bought either online or at a ...


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Switzerland is member of the Schengen area. So you don't need any extra visa to enter Switzerland.


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The flights between Brussels and Barcelona are intra-Schengen flights, so you will not go through passport check (as already mentioned in the comments). You will enter the Schengen zone only once (in Brussel) so your single-entry visa is enough for your trip. In Brussels you can get out of the airport, I see no problem.


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Schengen usually has very specific insurance requirements, such as repatriation of remains, a minimum value for life insurance and a minimum value for foreign hospital care. I've never heard of a requirement that the insurer must be European. For example, quoting the French embassy website about visa requirements: MEDICAL INSURANCE, A letter from an ...


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In my experience, travel insurance usually covers you until the date of your planned return home, or the actual date when you return home, whichever is later. This generally only applies if your delay is caused by something out of your control that is covered by your policy. So, if you fall ill on the last day of your trip and have to be taken to hospital, ...


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(1) Return tickets are usually cheaper than singles. At worse you can throw away the return component. You will have to telephone if you want the return sector to be more than on year away from the booking date, simply because the flights are not loaded in the system yet. Most airlines will allow this though. Presumably you will want to visit your home at ...


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In your case, because it's already June and your stay will be shorter than a year, buying a return ticket might still (barely) be possible but note that airlines everywhere have a one-year booking horizon and/or a limit of one year between departure and return so that it's simply impossible to present a return ticket for a visa lasting one year or more. So, ...


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Yes, you can enter all those countries, including Bulgaria and Romania with a valid multiple-entry Schengen visa. Even some non-EU countries might grant your wife a visa exemption based on her Schengen visa (if she needs a visa in those countries in the first place). See Which are the non Schengen countries that allow entry from a Schengen country? for ...


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As @GayotFow already commented you would almost certainly be allowed to travel in the Schengen area based on your visa (and, later, your residence permit). You would also be allowed to enter the Schengen area through any member state, and not only France. There are a few corner cases and special documents that do not allow that, but you are unlikely to get ...


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I am not aware of any stats that would support that notion nor is there any rule that explicitly ties the amount of money you have to the visa you get. The consulate basically has two options when issuing a visa: Issue something that covers the trip you described on the application, with a bit of buffer in case something happens. That's the most likely ...


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There are no hard and fast rules, you have to convince the consulate that you meet all the requirements and, specifically, that you have sufficient financial means for your trip and that you will leave the Schengen area at the end of the stay. Being unemployed is a disadvantage on both counts, because it means you have no income to fund the trip and no ...


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There are no Schengen wide regulations on how to react on visa violations and overstays. Each member state is free to set their own penalties and reactions. Overstays are usually settled with a fine, but in severe cases, you can also be banned from entering Schengen for a period of time. I can't find any current rates, but in 2011 Switzerland issued fines ...


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Having money is a great way to help get a tourist visa, but it doesn't necessary mean that more money will result in a longer validity -- or even get a visa at all. As an example, people are currently paying around EUR 9,000 and up to EUR 25,000 to get unlawfully trafficked into Europe, so if money were the sole factor they could show those funds as ...


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So, yes it would seem you do need a visa if you want to leave the airport even if you have a valid Schengen visa. This is the relevant portion from the link for Indian citizens, Ordinary, Special and Service passport holders are required to have visa to enter Turkey. Ordinary, Special and Service passport holders with a valid Schengen or OECD ...


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Well you've read right. According to Ministry of Foreign affairs you will need to have your visa valid at least 5 days past your leaving Macedonia and it has to be Multiple Entry. 3. Third countries with multiple entry short stay Schengen visa type C valid at least 5 (five) days beyond the intended stay in the Republic of Macedonia. may stay in ...


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Earlier today, UKVI issued an announcement which is reproduced here in its entirety... I am writing to update you on further improvements to the UK's visa service in China. Today the UK and Belgian governments have announced a new pilot scheme that will streamline the visa application processes for Chinese nationals wanting to visit the UK, ...


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No, you will not be able to. You will almost certainly be denied boarding by your airline and, if you do somehow make it to the port of entry, you would be refused entry, detained and forced to return to your point of origin at the earliest opportunity. And since you have a Schengen visa, it also means you actually require one to enter and therefore ...


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For the first 90 days of your stay in the Czech Republic, your husband should apply under the Visa procedures for the short stay of Family Members of EU Citizens (up to 90 days). The visa application for family members of EU nationals is free of charge. The general processing time is fourteen days, but it might be extended, especially if the supporting ...


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As you tell it, it seems completely off-base. You do in any case have a right to move to the Czech Republic (with a few caveats: you need to either work or have sufficient financial resources) and to have your spouse join you so it seems odd to refuse him a visa on that basis (and, indeed, the usual grounds for refusal like “your intention to leave the ...


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I suspect that these steps are not laid out anywhere on the internet, so here goes: A Schengen visa applies only to short stays of 90 days or fewer. These are also called "uniform" Schengen visas. The C visa is for normal visits; the A and B visas are for transit only. Schengen countries also have other categories of visa that authorize longer stays ...


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Unlike, say, US visas, Schengen visas do not only need to be valid on the day of entry but also define how long you are allowed to stay in the area. So if your visa sticker says “8 days” under “duration of stay” then it means you can only stay 8 days in the Schengen area under this visa. Similarly, you must leave the Schengen area before the end of your ...


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When the Schengen refusal reason is "Your intention to leave the territory of the member states before the expiry of the visa could not be ascertained", it means your application failed to clear a risk assessment. The procedures for a risk assessment vary from country-to-country and are never publicly disclosed. Generally, however, they take several ...


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A short stay Schengen visa entitles the holder to visit the Schengen countries for tourism, visiting friend/family, business etc., up to 90 days within a 180 day period from the date of first entry. the stay may be either continuous or several visits depending upon whether the visa is single or multiple entry single entry visa Allows uninterrupted stay. ...


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I think it's impossible to give a definitive answer to that question. The controlling norm is the Schengen Borders Code, specifically article 5: For the purposes of implementing paragraph 1, the date of entry shall be considered as the first day of stay on the territory of the Member States and the date of exit shall be considered as the last day of ...


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The Romanian visa does not make much difference, except perhaps in allowing you to lodge your visa application in a consulate in Romania instead of your country of origin. You will still need to fulfil all the requirements of a regular Schengen visa. Also, being a resident of a rich country like the US or UK would seem to bolster your credibility as a ...


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Its common as you also missed attaching the required documents it happens.i would suggest you to re-apply with those documents missed, chance of getting approved is more if it valid. it won't affect your future applications


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From this page, it would seem that you do not need an transit visa to transit in Italy.


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According to Visa policy of the Schengen Area, the amount required for visitors to Switzerland is: CHF 100 per day; CHF 30 for students


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Member states of destination is plural and member state of first entry is singular for a simple reason: you can only enter Schengen from one state but you can visit more that one member state whilst in the Area. So I imagine that in your case first entry would be Spain, and member destination states would be Spain and France.


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No traveller clears immigration at a usual internal Schengen border, EU citizen or not. For all intents and purposes regarding travel the Schengen area can be seen as a single country. Almost every time nobody shows their passport or visa and there is nobody they could show them to. Note that there are some national visas which don't allow travel to all ...


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This is possible by article 5 paragraph 4(a) of the Schengen Borders Code (Regulation (EC) No 562/2006) third-country nationals who do not fulfil all the conditions laid down in paragraph 1 but hold a residence permit or a re-entry visa issued by one of the Member States or, where required, both documents, shall be authorised to enter the territories of ...


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As a South Korean citizen, you can definitely enter either France or Italy and travel between the two for 90 days after the expiration of both your permit and your student visa so you certainly won't be staying illegally in France or Italy, be subject to removal or anything like that in September/October. For more details on this, see Getting a tourist ...


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It's OK to enter the Netherlands with a French visa (see Should my first trip be to the country which issued my Schengen Visa? for the rules on short-stay visas and Can I visit Schengen countries on a long term French Visa? about long-stay visas). That's possible even if you enter the Netherlands directly from a non-Schengen country (i.e. not going through ...


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I believe it would be best for you to get your visa cancelled (from the Hungarian Embassy) as you don't intend to use it for your "supposed" trip dates. Unused Visa may not be looked upon kindly (as mentioned by Ankur). It is recommended you apply for the Schengen visa from the correct Schengen Country embassy to which you are actually going to travel with ...


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From the French embassy in India, for Tourist Visa, it mentions : Justificatifs d’hébergement (contrat de location devant faire apparaître votre nom, les dates de séjour, et les coordonnées de l’hôtel ou du logement). which means that the proof of accommodation should show : Your name Dates of the accommodation (from-to) Name and address of ...


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The government of the Netherlands provides a site that tells that you should be able to extend your visa: Can I extend a Schengen visa in the Netherlands? You can only extend a Schengen visa under special circumstances, for example if you are seriously ill. You will need to meet certain conditions. For example, your total stay must not exceed 90 ...


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Yes it is. Since Schengen visa allows to travel to any of the Schengen states only 1 visa of any given type can be issued for a given period. There have been multiple related question on the subject: Can I have multiple Schengen visas for future travels in my passport? And more specifically: Traveling on back to back Schengen visas Describing ...



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