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2

A transit visa is not necessary, since you are not among the unlucky few listed here, which for the record are Afghanistan Bangladesh Congo (Democratic Republic) Eritrea Ethiopia Ghana Iran Iraq Nigeria Pakistan Somalia Sri Lanka Angola Guinea Guinea Bissau Nepal Sudan Syria South Sudan Sierra Leone


4

Yes, in principle you should have gotten an entry stamp for the Schengen area. It seems the French border guard did not follow the rules. I don't think the UK border guards generally put exit stamps in passports, I believe the UK authorities should have gotten a passenger list from IDBUS so you should be fine as far as the UK is concerned. As far as ...


1

As @dusky explained, your parents' visa do not allow this. They definitely need to get something else or risk a heavy fine and other problems when leaving the area. There are some provisions to extend Schengen visas but only for serious personal reasons or force majeure so that's probably not an option in your case. Alternatively, they could also get ...


3

Your visa is valid for 55 days ("Duration of stay: 55 days"), not 90. You will have to contact the migration office of your canton. Adresses are listed here. The canton of Aargau describes the requirements to extend the visa on its homepage as: Der Visuminhaber belegt, dass er aufgrund höherer Gewalt (z.B. ein aus meteorologischen Gründen ...


2

Croatia is still not part of the Schengen area. The border between Croatia and, say, Slovenia or Hungary is treated as an external border and you should get an exit stamp, which also means the time spent in Croatia will not count towards the 90-day maximum stay in the Schengen area. Same thing if you take a flight out of a Schengen country to Croatia. Just ...


1

I submitted exactly those things earlier when I got my Schengen sometime ago (except for the paystubs, even though I had a part time job as a student in my university) and the documents were accepted as complete.


1

Your understanding of the 90 days maximum stay rule is not at stake. The point is that it's not the only relevant rule. You cannot in any case be in the Schengen area without a valid visa or residence permit, quite independently from the time spent in the Schengen area. Schengen visas are completely different from US visas in this respect. My guess is that ...


1

As Mexican citizen, she doesn't need to apply for a visa and therefore does not need insurance. While a return ticket is not formally required, it's certainly useful to be able to show one. Border guards can ask her to produce other supporting documents but most of the time they don't do it. See also Documents necessary (and recommended) for first time ...


1

Could there be a problems with Swedish customs, if that is not in paper, is on her cellphone? Chances are she will be just fine. I have travelled without any insurance documents many a times and never been asked to furnish it either at border controls or anywhere while travelling inside the EU (I carry my EHIC card always anyway). If asked anywhere ...


2

The maximum validity of a Schengen visa is 5 years (article 24 of the Schengen Visa Code). What you get is left at the discretion of the consulate to which you apply but I think a UK work permit does indeed improve your chances of getting a multiple-entry visa valid for a year or more. Note that you cannot in any case stay more than 90 days in any 180-day ...


0

As long as you have a UK visa I don't see why your expiring residence permit should matter. Make sure you enter the UK with the UK visa and not with the residence card.


2

An expired residence permit certainly does not allow you to stay or travel in the Schengen area by itself. There aren't any systematic border checks so you would not generally meet any border guard at the border between Norway and Sweden or at the airport when flying back to Sweden. You might therefore easily get away with intra-Schengen travel without ...


6

From wikipedia: Andorra has stayed outside the Schengen Agreement and maintains border controls with the EU. However as travellers to Andorra have to pass through the Schengen Area, and Andorra does not issue any visas, but accepts Schengen visas, Andorra is in practice a virtual part of the area. Third country nationals wishing to visit Andorra need a ...


2

You only need to wait at most 90 full days to avoid falling foul of the Schengen area rules on maximum stay (Whether you need to stay 90 days out of the Schengen area or less depends on how your previous stay was divided, if it was one block of 150 days, then you do need to wait exactly 90 days after the day you left the Schengen area.) The reason cited to ...


1

Yes and no. If you do get a multiple-entry French visa, you could easily get away with not traveling to France. If some border guards or consular agent somehow notices it at some point in the future (e.g. when applying for another visa), you could be asked about it but if you have a plausible story, not having been to France is not enough to get into serious ...


3

As Tor-Einar Jarnbjo correctly pointed out (+1), Schengen visas cannot generally be obtained from within France (or, in fact, anywhere in the Schengen area). It's sometimes (but not always) possible to apply for a residence permit from within a Schengen member state. In France, there are some exceptions (and as a PhD student, you might qualify for one) but ...


2

It's possible to have several visas in the same passport (e.g. an expired visa and a new one), even two unused visas with different periods of validity or back-to-back visas valid over a long period. On the other hand, I don't think consulates would generally issue overlapping visas but none of this is relevant to your travel plans. Whether you have one or ...


2

Unless the consulate specifically asked for a credit report (and I would be very surprised if they did), they won't actively seek this information (and they would have to pay for it, too). There is just not enough time and resources for this level of diligence on each visa application. In your case, since you are the spouse of an EU citizen and traveling ...


1

Exiting Schengen and reentering does not seem to be a requirement to make your stay valid. As other answers show it, it is possible to spend up to 90 days inside the Schengen area for tourism purpose even if you had a long-stay visa before. This is only experience and is not an authoritative source, but a friend (who does not need a visa for short stay) ...


2

Under the Schengen agreement, “systematic” border checks have been abolished. In practice, it's very unlikely that your passport will be checked by the police but it does not mean that there cannot be any check or that the airline will not ensure you have appropriate documentation (in particular, Ryanair is notorious for that). Legally speaking, whether a ...


0

My question is, will there be any immigration checks on our route to and from Paris? No. Both Norway and Paris (well, France) are part of the Schengen Area. Quoting wikipedia.org (emphasis mine), The Schengen Area is the area comprising 26 European countries that have abolished passport and any other type of border control at their common borders, ...


1

I cannot provide a comprehensive answer or comparison between Schengen countries but I can add a few bits of relevant information: There are no firm rules at the EU level about that. Schengen countries honor each other's bans through a database called the SIS but they did not agree on the exact circumstances under which people should be banned. EU ...


2

It's difficult to know in general, especially without a lot more information. One thing that might weight in your favor is that one of the most common reasons to refuse a visit/short-stay visa is in fact the concern that the person might overstay her visa and use it to immigrate illegally. That's a good thing for you to the extent that a spouse visa is ...


10

The annulment should have been be recorded and shared between Schengen countries (there is a database especially for that). This will weight negatively against any Schengen visa application you might submit in the (near?) future. On the other hand, as far as I can tell, you haven't received a formal ban so any consulate can still legally issue a visa if they ...


0

one year multiple-entry Schengen visa Read it (and the conditions) VERY carefully. "Visa" (the word) is frequently mis-used. Strictly speaking, a visa gets you across the border, at which time you are given permission to remain for a period of time. So, if your visa says something like "remain for 90 days within a 180-day period" you can use up your ...


11

You can enter a Schengen country on the last day of validity of your visa but, unlike US visas, you must also legally leave the Schengen area before your visa expires (or obtain some other visa or legal means to stay). It's also perfectly possible to enter on a visa and stay and leave on another one. If you are entering on the last day of validity and you ...


7

Schengen countries check and stamp your passport when you leave so even if they'd let you in the country if you left on an expired visa that could make future attempts to get a visa more complicated. I would strongly advise against it.


0

The critical information needed to answer your question is whether or not you need to transfer in London (i.e., collect your baggage and board another plane). If the answer to this question is no, then you do NOT need a transit visa. If the answer is yes, then you need a transit visa. There are situations where you can ask the Immigration Officer for a ...


2

Brussels and Geneva are both in the Schengen area. For this reason, the flight to Geneva will depart from another part of the airport than the flight from Ouagadougou and there will generally be no passport check on arrival in Geneva. Because of that, an airport transit visa is not enough and the US green card does not help either. You will enter the ...


0

No, in principle you should apply at your place of residence. In practice, many consulates might accept applications from citizens without asking for any other evidence that you are in fact a resident or or make an exception depending on your circumstances but technically that's the rule.


1

You should be able to apply in India. See the FAQ here: http://eeas.europa.eu/delegations/india/more_info/faq/schengen_visa_en.htm#faq5 However you may have to explain to the embassy you are applying to about the reason you are applying from India rather than the USA where you currently reside.


2

Yes, you can. From the Romanian ministry of Foreign Affairs' website (emphasis is mine): According to Emergency Government Ordinance no. 109/2013, as of February 1st 2014, the bearers of uniform visas (with 2 or multiple entries), long-term visas, as well as residence permits issued by Schengen Member States shall no longer be required to hold a ...


4

The format is the same for (almost) all visas in the Schengen area but those fields are most relevant for short-stay type C visas. Thus a short-stay visa could be restricted to one or two entries or have a limitation on the duration of stay. In that case, “Number of entries” would read “1” or “2” and “Duration of stay” could for example be “10 days”. ...


2

US citizens cannot get a Schengen visa in any event and nobody can get a (regular type C) Schengen visa if they used up their 90 days of stay in the area. There is no legal way to get a visa that would allow you to stay anywhere in the Schengen area for more than 90 days but there are several ways to get the right to stay in a particular Schengen country. ...


6

Generally speaking travel documents for travelling within Schengen zone are: passport or EU/EEA national ID card. Officially none other documents are accepted, however some airlines might be more relaxed in their requirements. RyanAir is not one of these airlines, and RyanAir will not let you travel with just residency permit (I'm also speaking from personal ...


9

Screening at the gate is done at a number of other major airports, including Singapore Changi, Kuala Lumpur International, etc. And it has one massive advantage from the airport operator's point of view: you don't need to separate arrivals and departures. This means that instead of essentially duplicating all routes to the aircraft (one for passengers ...


1

Gibraltar does not belong to the Schengen area. It means that you might need a visa depending on your citizenship and your situation but also that you should make sure to get Schengen entry and exit stamps if you want to stay sometimes there and don't want to loose time from your 90 days of authorized stay in the Schengen area. That might mean seeking a ...


2

As per the Wikipedia article on visa policy of British Overseas Territories, Specifically considering the fact that you hold a Multi-Entry Schengen Visa, you don't need a visa if you are a citizen of either China, India, Mongolia, Morocco or Russia. citizens of China, India, Mongolia, Morocco and Russia holding a Schengen multiple entry visa with a ...


0

The Schengen visa is valid for all countries of l’espace Schengen; you can use it for entering l’espace Schengen at any border. If it has not expired, you are ok. But the national authorities can still refuse you entry for another reason: you are coming from a dangerous country, you have an arrest warrant on your head, etc ;)


2

If your long stay visa for Switzerland is valid, then you will not need a transit visa. Switzerland is a part of the Schengen Area and your flight from Zurich to Brussels will be Intra-Schengen. So you should be passing thru Schengen border control in Brussels. If you are exhausting your visa on the last day, board the flight before your visa gets exhausted ...



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