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0

If it's really important that France and not Switzerland is your point of entry then it's quite possible. You simply exit GVA from the French side and get your passport stamped by French immigration if they happen to be there, take a taxi to Ferney-Voltaire which is literally five minutes away from the airport. From there you can take a Line F bus to Geneva ...


1

Welcome to Grenoble! It's a beatiful city. To answer your question, there is a very cheap Geneva<->Grenoble bus, and I have never ever seen checks conducted on it. I have taken the train as well, with the same result. EDIT: Clarification on the bus. The bus in question is http://www.aerocar.fr/en/, departing from the airport every hour or so. There is ...


1

If you are visiting Nice then you must already have permission to enter the Schengen area. Frankfurt is also part of the Schengen area, so the visa that gets you into Nice will cover it. You will clear immigration in Frankfurt and then fly to Nice without further checks.


2

Whether you need a visa depends on your citizenship. The rules are more-or-less the same as they would be if you would still be a resident in your country of origin or elsewhere in the world. If you do need a visa, then you will have to apply for it from the relevant consulate in the UK. Being a UK Tier 2 visa holder should help a bit as it makes you less ...


3

It does not matter. France and Switzerland are members of the Schengen area. There will be a border control when you enter the area. When travelling between countries there are no border controls. However, the French Police is regularly patroling in international trains and makes sporadic controls. They may ask travel documents or about the purpose of ...


10

I have frequently travelled by train in and out of Switzerland. Border guards used to enter the train at the border, run through the train, asking one or two people for their passports (or, rarely, everybody) and getting off again. But now Switzerland is in Schengen, so the train journey should be no problem at all. It does mean that Switzerland will be ...


1

No, as this is a transit flight and your are not leaving the airport while your are in Munich.


6

How long should I wait? According to the FAQs on their website, you should have received the insurance certificate immediately after payment: Q: How do you send the proof/certificate of insurance? A: The mandatory insurance certificate is sent by e-mail immediately after payment. You just need to print it. Since it's not uncommon for ...


3

In Germany, all bilateral exemptions are regulated in § 16 AufenthV and listed in Appendix A. Those exemptions are summarized for official use in section 4.1.3.1 of the VwV-AufenthG (general administrative regulation for the residence act). Regarding the 90-180 rule exemptions apply to citizens of the following countries (see below for a rough ...


0

I don't know how long the cruise was, but you probably have a USA re-entry stamp.


3

It's only a problem when it becomes a problem. Canada/USA has a similar issue - no outbound controls and LOTS of cross-border road / foot / marine traffic. People from first-world countries going to Europe will likely never have an issue. You arrived, took a fairly expensive holiday, and you say you returned when you did. Highly unlikely you hid in the ...


5

There are no Schengen-wide records of entries and exits so no way for border guards to check how long you have stayed in Europe beyond examining the stamps in your passport. Furthermore, the Schengen border code explicitly puts the onus of proving you haven't stayed longer than 90 days on you: Article 11 Presumption as regards fulfilment of ...


1

As you already pointed out - they don't know for sure if you left within 90 days. However, it is very unlikely going to give you any problems. As recommended by @Willeke, you could bring your former travel documents/itinerary along in case there are any questions. The 90 days period only applies within a 180 days time frame, which has long expired since ...


4

The procedure in this case is that you apply for a 46 day visa. It is then up to the consulate whether they (a) reject your application, (b) issue a 46 day visa, or (c) issue multiple-entry 90-days-presence-out-of-X-days-validity visa. It is not under your control whether (b) or (c) happens. It is not uncommon that frequent travelers who have a history of ...


2

It depends on the visa you actually obtain. If you get a multiple-entry long term visa with 90 days stated as the maximum time to spend in the Schengen region, then yes, it will be valid for 90 days out of 180. This being your first time comes into play into the chances of obtaining such a visa, which is very slim. In case of getting the visa, it doesn't ...


0

If you want to exit the airport and look around, then you will need a visa. If you remain in the transit area, then you will not need a visa if you are at the airport for less than 48 hours. Source: http://www.visaswitzerland.co.uk/VisaSwitzerlandTransit.php


2

I have no idea about (2) -- try calling the consulate and ask! -- but as for (1): In order to get the Belgian consulate to process a visa application, you need to propose an itinerary where Belgium is the main destination of your trip, which means it has to be the state where you will spend most of the time (15 versus 7 days ought to do it). If they issue ...


0

I'm aware that the Schengen visa allows free movement across 29 countries in the Euro area, but how free is it, exactly? As free as you want it to be. Once your Visa is granted, you can move freely across countries until your permission expires. Please note that even though the UK is in the EU, it is not participating in the Schenghen programme and, as ...


0

There are comprehensive information portals directly by the EU. Below is the information for India. http://eeas.europa.eu/delegations/india/more_info/faq/schengen_visa_en.htm


5

Yes, the Swiss Ministry of Foreign Affairs requires that photographs attached to visa applications are not more than 6 months old.


0

It is ok to go to any Schengen country with a valid Schengen visa and correct type, regardless of the country issued the visa.


5

The airline was incorrect to deny boarding. In fact, there is no "longest stay" option. The rules do not give you a choice. Rather, the rule specifies that you must get your visa from the country of longest stay if there is a country of longest stay. The "or country of first entry" part of the rule comes into play only if there is no obvious country of ...


1

Yes. Aliens who are holders of: uniform visa (C) for two or multiple entries, valid for all Schengen Area Member States; visa with limited territorial validity (LTV visa), for two or multiple entries, issued to the holder of a travel document that is not recognised by one or more, but not all of the Schengen Area Member States, and ...


1

The Schengen visa fee is waived for non EEA/non UK spouse/children of UK nationals. Only facilitation charges are take by service provider. The proof of relationship is required like marriage certificate, birth certificate for kids.


1

Your friend does not need a visa to enter Switzerland, thanks to her Spanish residence card. I am not even sure she could get one and it would not help the passport issue. If crossing an external border, then the passport expiration date could be a problem. The Schengen Borders Code now requires from third-country nationals that (a) they are in ...


2

You should apply to the country you are going to, like every other visitor. If you happen to go to the country your spouse is from, different rules might apply but otherwise the visa should be free of charge. These rules only apply if you are travelling with your EU spouse (or to join him or her). If you are travelling alone, then you have to apply for a ...


0

No. Information as of 14MAY15 / 2002 UTC National India (IN) /Embarkation USA (US) Transit Austria (AT) /Destination India (IN) ALSO CHECK DESTINATION INFORMATION BELOW Austria (AT) TWOV (Transit Without Visa): Visa required, except for Holders of onward tickets in transit . *Note: TWOV is not possible when arriving from a ...


3

In principle, you are indeed allowed to spend another 90 days in the Schengen area, because the time spent under a long-stay visa or residence permit does not count towards the maximum duration of a visa-free short-stay, see Does tourist visa (90 days) apply after a working holiday visa ends in Schengen countries? One issue will however be how those 90 days ...


2

The rule is that within any 180 days time windows, you must not be present in the Schengen zone for more than 90 calendar days. It does not matter when it is "half time" - if there is any period of 180 consecutive days in which you would be present for 91 days or more, you would overstay your visa. The EU has a Schengen visa calculator that allows you to ...


0

Those visa forms generally don't expect an exhaustive list of your past travels. This means that if you've traveled to today's Schengen countries let's say 50 times in your life, listing them one by one won't really make sense. Yet in case you've entered Schengen twice and another couple of times to current Schengen countries before they joined the union, it ...


2

Not sure what can or cannot be done but you can always apply. If the consulate cannot issue a visa for a technical reason like that, they should decline to process the application, which means you would get back your visa fee and the documents you submitted. In principle, they should also tell you that quickly. There is no risk of an actual visa refusal, ...


3

Assuming that as a foreign student, your primary source of income / financial support is in a bank in your home country, online statements will likely be your only source of documentation. These are usually acceptable, but be sure to print out the entire document. If you want to go a step further, you might try asking your country's Embassy in the UK if ...


3

There are several approaches to this problem, none of them perfect: Contact the Spanish consulate before the trip and ask them what to do. That's the safest and most proper way but it could be a bit difficult to reach someone who can actually answer your question, especially if that particular consulate uses a third-party outsourcing company to handle visa ...


2

Beside the period of validity, there are two other things you have to check to make sure your visa is still valid: The number of allowed entries The maximum stay (it is to be understood as a grand total across all stays under this visa, except if it is “90” and the visa is valid for more than six months, in which case it means up to 90 days in any 180-day ...


0

Entering without a visa (if your citizenship allows it) or obtaining a Schengen visa in advance (if you have to) does not make any difference with respect to the 90/180 maximum stay rule so so all the info you found about visa-holders fully applies to visa-exempt visitors like yourself as well. You can check About Schengen 90/180 rule for a full ...


2

A visa type C is a Schengen short-stay visa, and may be granted for "Academic/ scientific visit not exceeding 90 days". My understanding of the procedure, as described on that page of the French consulate, and based on the Official Journal of the European Union, is that scientific researchers are given an easier entry into Schengen than tourists or some ...


-2

If you want Spaghetti Bolognese, go to Bologna! I once ordered Spaghetti Bolognese in Genova, Italy. The waiter told me: "If you want Spaghetti Bolognese, go to Bologna!", then she served pasta & pesto which is typical for Genova. Rudeness aside, it's good point: why travel half the globe to sit and eat the same thing as you have at home? In Italy ...


3

Since you're arriving in Madrid from a non-Schengen origin (Lima) and leaving on a flight to a non-Schengen destination (London), it's quite possible that you won't need to leave the international transit zone in Madrid. If that is the case, you won't be entering the Schengen zone, and not get any stamps, entry or exits. Whether you need to leave the ...


1

Summary: It's not possible to avoid getting an exit stamp if you got an entry stamp but in this case, you will probably get no stamp at all in Madrid. Third-country citizens (i.e. people who are not either EU/EEA or Swiss citizens) usually get a stamp every time they enter or leave the Schengen area. So if your partner gets an entry stamp in Madrid and ...


2

The UK wasn't one of the destinations you mentioned, but I suspect the situation is similar. Firstly, most UK restaurants describing themselves as Indian are in fact Bangladeshi or Pakistani run. Secondly, the food you get served there is nothing like the food you get in India (or, as I've been told, Pakistan or Bangladesh). The main differences (to my ...


4

I don't know how diligent each and every consulate is in enforcing this rule but in principle you should not be able to do that. Here is article 6 of the Schengen Visa Code: Consular territorial competence An application shall be examined and decided on by the consulate of the competent Member State in whose jurisdiction the applicant legally ...


4

Whether you can apply for a Schengen visa in London depends on the rules and conditions of the embassy that will be issuing the visa. And which embassy to choose depends on the "main country" of your planned travel. So first find out which is the main country of your travel, then find the website of the respective embassy, and then look at the rules on ...


2

I don't think you are entitled to travel with just that. For example, the official guidance for law enforcement personnel explains that De geprivilegieerdenkaart van Buitenlandse Zaken geeft, samen met een geldig reisdocument, de houder het recht het Schengengebied binnen te komen (en daar te reizen). In English: The geprivilegieerdenkaart from ...


21

Specific to Paris (and vegetarian food) : There are many Indian restaurants next to Gare du Nord, on Rue du Faubourg Saint-Denis, which has a significant Tamil presence. Passage Brady has many Indian restaurants too. Quality can vary, but I specifically recommend two restaurants, Sangeetha and Saravana Bhavan, both Chennai-based south Indian vegetarian ...


1

If it's anything like Australia: ask a taxi driver! We have many Indian taxi drivers here and they always know the best, cheapest Indian restaurants. I'm from the UK and I know the situation is the same there, but I'm not so sure about mainland Europe, sorry. I've travelled a lot, and it is definitely always possible to find Indian food. You want to avoid ...


2

The Dutch national ID card, can indeed be used as a travel document within the EEA and Switzerland. This is true for various other ID cards released by countries inside the EEA and Switzerland. Since the EEA includes the EU, and Hungary is inside the EU you should be able to fly to Budapest with your Dutch ID card.


8

When I left the UK to live in germany I missed Indian food more than anything. These days it's easy: Google is your friend. There are Indian restaurants everywhere. If you check out Trip Advisor you will even get reviews, though they are sometimes suspect.


5

I've definitely eaten Indian food in Paris (was a few years back so don't remember exact location). Can't speak for the other places. But I'm sure it won't be like it is at home - they'll have adapted things to fit local tastes - it's sound business. If they only like spicy things they could try Moroccan or Turkish. But as they saying goes, when in ...


14

In big cities like that, you could probably find an Indian or a few Indian restaurants (if you know where they are), although I'm not sure about all of them. I suggest googling for Indian restaurants in these cities and look where they are, as they won't have one on every corner. Quality: don't expect it will (always) be the actual same food as in India ...


2

Yes, the immigration officer can see all the stamps in your passport, and can, at their discretion, refuse you entry into the country (even if you have a valid visa to enter). Further, some countries share databases with this information that might effect your ability to get a visa in the first place. If you just want to get rid of the overstay stamp, you ...



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