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1

The generic name for this type of situation is 'Change of Circumstances'. They do not count against the person if they are properly declared and not abused. If your friend wants to play it strictly by the book, you can advise your friend to file a variance with the German consulate that issued the visa, and explain that the loan did not come through as ...


0

You cannot apply for the same category visa when you are already in possession of a valid one currently. You can however apply under a different category. Canceling a visa is not normal practice and really depends on the person dealing with you. It is not normal procedure they adopt, may make an exception depending upon who is dealing with you and you ...


-1

You do not need a transit visa for a connecting flight. You would however need one if you are planning to come out of the airport which does not make sense for a 5 hour stopover. As long as you have valid entry permits for Spain you don't have anything to worry about. A Schengen visa also has restrictions like the first port of entry has to be the issuing ...


1

This may sound harsh, but if you show the Swedish embassy proof that you have a lot of economic resources, it will be easy to get a visa. If you don't, think twice before you try again. Sweden is cold and dark and may be a difficult place for someone used to living in tropical conditions. Sweden is currently overwhelmed by Syrian and Iraqi immigrants. This ...


-8

Several things tell me too that you were not planning to leave Sweden after your visa has expired. I am sorry you were denied the visa, but the outcome seems reasonable to me. First, you talk about visiting friends and family, then it's your boyfriend, then your man. Second, you are a student but won't be a student anymore in one month. So, no reason to ...


4

I believe that the "real" reason for the denial of your visa was number 2, "Your intention to leave the territory of the member states before the expiry of the visa could not be ascertained." A complicating factor appears to be the "boyfriend" issue. The country may already be uncertain about him, and therefore about you. Since you have not told us your ...


2

Given the knowledge I obtained through years of applying to residence permits and visas, I can say (in my non-expert opinion) that this was to be expected. If I were your case officer, I'd have reported enough red flags for you to have a negative decision. Let's see the reasons they've given you: 1.Justification for the purpose and conditions of the ...


18

Long term ties to your homeland There are multiple obvious reasons why your visitor visa was declined - you fail to prove that you can't possibly have any intention in staying in Sweden, and a number of factors indicate such a risk. You need to demonstrate serious long-term ties to your homeland, and lack of such ties to Sweden; you need to show that you ...


12

CGCampbell has provided a good answer. It is likely that you will not be granted a Schengen visa (that is what you are applying for, there's no Swedish visa) because your situation is precisely the one where governments often deny visas - you are from a less developed country, cannot show a source of income, and cannot show strong ties to your home country. ...


16

TL:DR: I don't think you can. Potential issues to overcome: no history of income Every country that is asked to admit a foreign national as a tourist, needs to ensure that person won't become a drain on resources provided for its citizens. You state your boyfriend is to provide your means to subsist. However, from Sweden's point of view, what if you ...


4

Italy is part of the Schengen zone, and if you are presenting a Canadian passport, a visa is not required beforehand. Canada is mentioned explicitly in Annex II of COUNCIL REGULATION (EC) No 539/2001 of 15 March 2001: listing the third countries whose nationals must be in possession of visas when crossing the external borders and those whose nationals ...


19

As a general principle, the entire Schengen area is considered one country for immigration purposes. This means in particular that a flight between two Schengen countries (in your case, Spain and Italy) is considered a domestic flight and there is no immigration control before or after the flight. Hence, in your case you will enter the Schengen area and ...


1

You don't indicate your Country of Residence, or Passport, but for an example, I used the Hellenic Republic (Greece in the UK) website. If you look at the page I linked, under the paragraph Required Documents, is the following information: • Supporting documents that clearly provide evidence of the following: Purpose of the intended journey ...


0

There's no fixed amount, and visa applications are all situational, but I'd recommend working out an itinerary and what you expect to pay For 10 days, I'd have said €1000 would be plenty, assuming your flights are paid, but they may want you to have enough to pay for a hotel if, for example, you fell out with your friend and couldn't stay there.


9

"...is it normal that the reconsideration visa will get cancelled within 2 days from submission date..." In the Schengen regime, they don't have a 'reconsideration visa'. So your application would have been treated as a fresh application within your history of applications. If your previous application was unsuccessful, they would focus on the ...


3

A T2 entry clearance (or colloquially, visa) is not recognized outside of the UK. Instead, the person's nationality is used as the determining factor. You wrote that you are Turkish... Turkish nationals are listed in the EU Council Regulation (EC) No 539/2001 as requiring a visa to enter the Schengen zone. See ...


1

The maximum you will get is a 1 year visa that too will depend on the embassy you are applying. Also it cannot extend beyond your UK Visa. I was living on Tier 1 and had applied for Schengen twice. The first time I got it for 1 year from the Czech embassy. The next time was just for the duration of the trip (2 weeks) when I applied to the Spanish embassy. ...


1

You do not need to have a return ticket from London. All they will need to see is you are leaving the UK and as you say you have a Eurostar ticket followed by a return ticket from Paris which should work. I am a non-EU citizen and didnt have any problems showing a London - Dubai - Delhi return.


0

Refusal of earlier visa doesn't mean you will not be given a visa this time. As I read in some of the comments, yes the scrutiny will be more than a normal person and just make sure your documents are just spot on. Your margin of error is less this time. Do not make fake bookings. They might actually call your hotel and check if you have actually booked it.


1

Generally speaking Schengen visas are valid for all allowed purposes (there is no “business” or “tourism” category like in the US for example) and for all countries in the area. So if you really do get a multiple-entry visa, it's fine to reuse it for another purpose after your first trip and you don't need to apply for another visa if the first one is still ...


1

You need to contact the embassy to get either the template or instructions concerning the details of the letter. As it has already been suggested, there is no single format for such letters and it is up to the embassy to decide what types of letters are accepted. Good luck.


1

I would suggest not to do this. Here's why? You have two further potential questions (read: problems): first, you will need to prove to the embassy that why you didn't apply while you were in the home country? This is simply because the embassy will require your proof of residence in the country i.e., from where you are applying. This will also include many ...


2

Since each of these countries would unilaterally decide whether they recognize Schengen visas and under which conditions, I don't think it's possible to find an official list anywhere. I am marking this answer as “community wiki” so that we can come up with a list: Bulgaria, Romania, Croatia and Cyprus (all EU members) have rules modelled on those of the ...


1

Tom already provided good advice (+1 to his answer) but I just noticed your comment. You apparently submitted documentation (leave from your work, tuition fees and funds) for a three-month stay while registering to a six-month program that you cannot possibly complete on a short-stay visa. That's a big no-no that would make your application look very ...


0

Yes, you can. The visa is your authorization to travel to the port of entry for the country that issued your the visa. It does not dictate from where you should travel. You can travel from Qatar, Egypt, or any other country. I should mention though - some countries issue visas that dictate how you may travel. For example, Saudi Arabia can issue you a land ...


1

Formally, it's not a problem. But even if the rules are not exactly the same, the reasons that led to the rejection of your previous application presumably still apply. You need to weigh that carefully and we certainly can't tell you if it's going to work or not.


0

Originally I applied for a Schengen visa short stay but my application was refused and now I'm planning to re-apply for a longer visa (6 months) for the same purpose, to study german language. You did not say why it was rejected (the specific reasons are mentioned in the response), but as a guess I would say that should not have applied for a short ...


1

I dont think it will be a problem, Imagine if you are travelling to multiple countries, and take a visa for all three from your home country, you would naturally travel from a country other than the one which issued you a visa. Port of origin wont matter at all for any visa. Specifically I am not able to find an evidence which can support my argument


-1

On your overstay of 1 day, you are not going to get deported. Whether this will affect future visas is difficult to know, especially as different countries, and different immigration officers may have different reactions. I would honestly not worry about it.


3

Item 2 is pretty self-explanatory, you need more money in your bank account or evidence of salary being paid while you travel. You can pad your account with money from family or friends, but don't just put one big lump sum in, as consular officials are wise to that trick. Add the money in smaller chunks over several weeks. Item 3 is a sticking point for ...


2

Whether it is for studies, for work or for any other purpose, a visa for 5-6 months is almost certainly a national long-stay visa. It means that the rules detailed in Getting a tourist Schengen visa after working visa fully apply to your situation. Concretely, the time spent under the French long-stay visa does not count towards the 90 days limit for short ...


2

The application form for a long-stay student visa does not ask about itinerary, visits to other countries, etc. like a Schengen visa application form because it is not intended for trips across Europe but only for people who want to study in France. Having a French long-stay visa or residence permit does allow short stays in other Schengen countries (up to ...


3

In the US, certain "tools" are not allowed on planes any more than "knives". I had left a small Torx wrench in my pocket once - like an Allen key but with a star shaped head, about 8 cm long. It was confiscated as a "tool" (I guess they thought I would unscrew the cockpit door with it). But that was about 10 years ago. These days, the TSA prohibits any ...


5

Most airports in "Schengen" follow all of the EU guidelines the IATA guidelines their own rules which they change every week (or while you are being controlled, or which the security guy makes up any way he feels) ... whichever is the most restrictive. The Frankfurt airport makes the first two available online in concise form, although only in German: ...


6

In practice (as opposed to "officially")... I carry one of these on my keychain, with 6 or 7 other keys. I've flown US domestic flights with it about half a dozen times and never had a problem. I gave one to all my coworkers for Christmas a few years back. One of these coworkers is a Muslim woman who wears a hijab. She flies a lot, and ALWAYS gets ...


17

The rules about knives through airport security vary from country to country. Generally, they all include "a blade over x cm in length". While x may vary, your blade looks to be at most 4 cm or 1.5". So if the rule is a blade over 5cm/2" is not allowed, you'll be fine. I think that is the rule most places, and there was talk of raising it to 7cm in the US ...


3

Never lie on applications. The stamp in your passport is NOT the only record that you've had your previos attempt rejected, I assure you. However, having a rejection does not necessarily mean you'll get rejected again. Overstaying visas certainly doesn't help, but I have a friend who overstayed his visa, was caught, and has since been back on a tourist ...


6

The strategy of concealing an adverse immigration event by 'losing' one's passport and getting a fresh, unblemished passport is a poor one. There is a history associated with the passport that is not accounted for in its physical pages, but rather in computer systems linked to the passport number. And a new passport will contain a record linking it back to ...


2

No, you can't do that. As I wrote in the comments, it doesn't matter if you were in Germany, Holland or somewhere else in the Schengen area. US citizens cannot get a schengen visa, but they are allowed to stay 90 days within a six months period. As I understand you were 2 times in the Schengen area: once for "over a month" and later for 59 days. So you were ...


0

It's not a problem to travel to France with a Schengen visa issued by German embassy. But if you have only a single entry visa, you can entry the Schengen area only once. You are not allowed to travel to France, then to go back to the UK and to Germany. But if you have a multiple entry visa, there is no problem in your situation.


4

The fact that you did not mention your side-trip to France should not be a problem as such. The details of your application will not be available to the border guards anyway. What could theoretically be an issue is going only to France with a German visa as it would look like you tried to circumvent the rules and to prevent having your application ...


2

Wikipedia says No Source: wikipedia


2

According to the EU Visa Policy page and documents linked on it describing and clarifying this policy. Citizens of Japan are not required to be in possession of a visa to enter Schengen Area (including Hungary, Germany, and Czech Respublic) for a short term stay (<90 days contiunous and 90/180 rule still applies).


3

(I didn't manage to find the duplicate, so I'll try to make a summary answer.) It all depends on two big aspects: Do you have one ticket (with transfer) or two separate tickets? To which country do you fly? If you have one ticket with transfer, then you should get checked in for both flights in Prague. I recommend to arrive the advised 2 hours before ...


1

You cannot cancel a visa, only the issuing authority can cancel it. You can revoke your application, but it seems like the visa has already been issued. Please do not do something like tear the visa page or otherwise vandalize it, this will cause you more problems than you can imagine. You can apply for another visa while one is already valid in your ...


2

It's largely up to the consulate processing your application. The Handbook for the processing of visa applications recommends issuing a visa valid for the duration of the trip (as documented in the application) plus a grace period of fifteen days (to make things simpler, in case you get delayed). But it even happens that consulates issue visas that are too ...


4

You're supposed to apply for a visa in the place where you live when applying. However, once you have the visa, there's no requirement that you enter the Schengen area directly from the place where you applied -- it's valid at all the external Schengen borders and for all anyone knows you could be on a longer itinerary.


2

You'll need to make an appointment for a personal appearance at the Embassy of Malta (call 020 7292 4821). Malta is a Schengen signatory and operates within that framework for tourists and business visitors. The items you listed will be part of your evidence: air tickets in and out, bank account details. If you are being hosted by a convent, they should ...


2

It seems difficult, for two reasons: You are supposed to apply for Schengen visas at the consulate covering your usual place of residence. The relevant regulation does however allow this requirement to be waived provided you have a good justification so maybe arguing that your theatre schedule prevents you from applying in South Africa would be enough. ...


6

You can enter Switzerland and stay there, for 90 days, under the usual rules which allow visa-free visits to the Schengen area for US citizens. The time spent in France under your French long-stay visa do not count towards these 90 days, see e.g. Does tourist visa (90 days) apply after a working holiday visa ends in Schengen countries? However I don't think ...



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