Hot answers tagged

31

You might be lucky with this, but it comes at a risk that Schengen authorities will not be happy about you arriving early even though you pass immigration only the next day. Your first problem will be to convince the airline to let you board as has been pointed out in comments and by @BurhanKhalid. If you do succeed, note that immigration in Zurich ...


24

I live in Zurich, and the Transit area is open 24/7 - also there's a Transit Hotel (which isn't cheap, but not super-expensive either) where you could sleep. Note that if arriving in the satellite building (which you will if flying from India or Singapore) you'll have to take the underground Train to the main building (follow the signs for the Exit), then ...


22

You do NOT have to return back to your home country. It's perfectly fine to travel to the US from anywhere as long as you have the right visa. Many people leave their home countries once, travel to many places as long as they have the right visas, then finally go back home. They don't have to go back home after every country they visit along the way. That'...


14

You do not need to return to India before going to the United States. In order to obtain a Schengen visa, you need to show that you are capable (have "sufficient means of subsistence", e.g. money) and intend to leave the Schengen area to a country where you are "certain to be admitted". As a practical matter, having a valid visa for such a third country, ...


10

Croatia will admit travelers who hold a Schengen visa only if that visa is valid for two or more entries. With a single-entry Schengen visa, you will not be allowed to enter Croatia. You should apply for a Croatian visa. See http://www.mvep.hr/en/consular-information/visas/visa-requirements-overview/.


9

No, you don't need any additional documentation. Your visa, which does allow you to go to the Netherlands or even to enter it directly from South Africa on a subsequent trip will probably not be checked by anybody. You will almost certainly need your passport to board the plane however.


8

I just noticed that you originally asked about EU countries in general, and not only about the Schengen area. You have to distinguish between different situations. Inside the Schengen area I doubt it's possible to get a stamp when traveling between Schengen countries. I cannot guarantee that it never ever happens and I realize it's not a very satisfying ...


8

Yes. It counts. You will enter the Schengen area as part of this trip. Under the right circumstances, you can make certain international-to-international air connections without entering Schengen, as airport transit lounges are secured areas that may permit you to get to your next flight without going through immigration. That is not how buses work. The ...


7

You met a woman on the net and she offered to sponsor you for a Schengen. She has children either older than you or in the same age range as you. This aspect of your sponsorship was probed during two interviews at the German consulate. You explained the premise of your visit was a family meeting in order to play football with her children. You are employed ...


7

That role falls to the sponsor to explain in a sponsor letter. There is no precise formulae guaranteeing success, but the object of a sponsor letter is to anticipate the decision-maker's questions and then to address as many as possible. You can treat this list as something like "pick and choose" the items relevant to your specific situation... the ...


6

Your father needs to send a notarized letter to the embassy stating his details, details of you and your brother stating that he authorizes you both to travel. The details should have your complete name (as listed in your passport) along with your passport details (like passport number / expiry date); and his details and a copy of his passport or other ...


6

There are indeed a few 'holes' in the external Schengen border, not only at the Spanish/Gibraltar border, but also: At the border of the European 'micro-states' Andorra, Monaco, San Marino and Vatican City, where the micro-states are not part of the Schengen area, but there is still no permanent immigration control at the borders. For most practical ...


6

Generally you must apply for a Schengen visa from the embassy or consulate serving the place of your residence. This is not necessarily the country of your nationality; if you are in a third country on a long stay visa such as a student or work visa, then you are a resident of that third country. Regulation (EC) No 810/2009 states: An application ...


6

A non-visa national, such as Argentine nationals, can pass in and out of the zone as long as the 90/180 rule is observed AND the person satisfies the landing interview with a valid premise. As a general rule, all interaction with border officials is governed by personal impact and articulation skills (along with demonstrating an understanding of the rules), ...


6

The passport number is not the only data point that countries can use to match an individual. Among other points that can be used are name, gender, date of birth, place of birth, all of which appear on the passport and together can uniquely identify pretty much anyone on earth, as well as biometrics (when available). In addition to demographics, they can ...


5

As @HenningMakholm mentions the belief that it's illegal or impossible to have two overlapping visas is misleading. The Visa Code (EU's main law on the Schengen area) mentions nothing about overlapping visas. However the Handbook for the processing of visa applications contains the following recommendation: A holder of a multiple-entry visa may apply for ...


5

Speaking from my experience. They're not going to reject it but they would tell you that there's no guarantee that you would get the visa in time because the person doing the paper is different than the person accepting the paper where you went to apply for the visa. If you explain to them nicely and ask for different options and prepare all the paper work ...


5

You have a visa with a day count restriction of 7 days and you want to stay for 14 days. The answer is yes, people do overstay their visas on occasion, there is not a border guard posted on every street corner checking documents. The problem comes when you exit the zone and your documents are inspected. At that point your overstay will be discovered ...


5

From this Home Affairs document explaining the codes: BNL 1 : visa issued following authorisation by the central authorities. BNL 2 : visa issued ex officio. BNL 3 + name of the border point of entry and/or the date of entry: this code will only be indicated for security reasons in exceptional cases. BNL 4 : visa issued in the ...


5

You are an Indian national with a 5 year UK Tier 2 visa and want to visit Portugal. Indian nationals need a Schengen visa before they can visit any of the member states, including Portugal. Having a UK visa is certainly helpful in determining your risk, but it has no value outside of the UK. By air, the carrier will not allow you to board and if you ...


5

He probably assumed that you were trying to immigrate there; you would go, and never come back - this is why he asked "What is your purpose of visiting Germany". It is clear from the rejection reasons that according to your application, you did not submit sufficient evidence of ties to Iran which convinced the officer that you intended to return back after ...


5

Answering if someone is looking for answer. Italian consulate website adds new slots (I guess these slots are a result of automatic cancellations in their system) everyday at 12 midnight Italy time. I made sure to login at that time and managed to find a slot well under a week.


4

While I agree with the first part of @MatthewHerbst's answer, I strongly disagree with his suggestion to "lose" your passport, so take this as a very extended comment if you wish: It depends a bit on your nationality whether you need a Schengen / UK visa or are eligible for a visa / leave to remain on arrival. However in both cases either in the visa ...


4

In early January 2016, I was flying from France to The Netherlands (so an intra-Schengen flight), as as a non-EU citizen, had my passport checked when leaving France, and stamped with a Schengen exit stamp. I was a bit confused what happened, so didn't have time to ask why this happened. In any case, I left the Schengen area from The Netherlands on a ...


4

According to the Schengen Visa Code: Nationals of the third countries listed in Annex IV shall be required to hold an airport transit visa when passing through the international transit areas of airports situated on the territory of the Member States. According to the German Embassy in India, Indian citizens also need to obtain an airport transit ...


3

If your airline boards you (which will be the biggest hurdle), you can then wait till midnight passes (the date switches) before crossing immigration. I don't think you can use the transit option as you are not actually in transit - that would be a false pretense. In the end, it will all depend on the airline.


3

Old post, but will answer anyway: the outbound trip (HEL-KBP-LCA) is not doable with a Finnish ID Card, whereas the return trip (LCA-KBP-HEL) is Why? The answer is that Finnish border guards won't allow Finnish citizens to board a plane to a country located outside both the EU and Schengen (in this case Ukraine). This is due to Finnish law, which states ...


3

As of 2016, the manned passport checks at Prague airport were replaced with boarding pass scanners. As a matter of fact, I didn't once have to show an ID flying PRG-BCN today. Therefore the question is now moot.


3

Yes, it counts, there are no exceptions for layover, transit or anything like that. If you cross an external border (which a bus must obviously do), you have to undergo a full border check and will get an entry stamp. The only reason it is sometimes (but only sometimes) possible to transit without a visa and/or without using up time from your 90 days is that ...


3

You have previously overstayed a Schengen and your application was referred to the Belgian national authority. You then learned that a refusal is in the pipeline. Would it be wise to reapply for a visa to Belgium itself or should I apply it for some other Schengen country ? No, an individual's history of applications is recorded in a central database ...



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