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29

The strategy gets a lot of mileage on the net because it sounds so perfect. Even on this site I read... Refusals to the Schengen area are not recorded centrally, you are not asked for prior refusals when applying for a new visa and chances are high that the only trace of the refused entry is a cancelled entry stamp in the passport. Get a new passport and ...


16

This answer assumes your entry clearance was issued under Appendix V of the rules. Your entry clearance was cancelled and you were removed from the UK. The stated reason is that you did not have the funds to pay for the cigarettes you were importing, I figure it was roughly GBP 160. The Immigration Officer was entitled to assume that you were in a ...


15

If your wife has an article 10 residence card, she does not need a visa if she travels with you. The UK's residence card for the family member of an EEA national is an article 10 card. She is also entitled to use the EU/EEA/Swiss passports queue when she arrives in the Schengen area, even though she doesn't have an EU, EEA, or Swiss passport, because she ...


14

There's several approaches you can take. They all involve some planning, and there are some extra marks of caution. Mix Schengen and non-schengen stays. The actual Schengen rules say for any given day in the Schengen area, you must have spent less than 90 out of the 180 preceeding days in the Schengen area. The EU even provides a calculator to help with ...


9

If you plan to "operate" your business over the phone, you might actually be working in Europe. That's not what a tourist does. There could be tax consequences, both home and abroad. If you can refrain from working on your business on your holiday, options might be: Apply for D visa for France or Italy, then only time in other countries counts against the ...


9

The information you found is outdated. There used to be a transit visa for the Schengen area but this is not the case anymore. And as you correctly surmised, the exemption for US visa holders only applies to the airport transit visa requirement. So you simply need a regular "uniform" short-stay Schengen visa if you want to leave the airport, no way around ...


9

Type B visas were abolished a few years ago. The site you've linked tois unofficial, despite its official-looking appearance. I am afraid you need a normal short-stay visa, type C. In any event, the application procedure for the two visas was essentially the same; you had to apply at a consulate. So the type B visa wouldn't have helped you anyway.


8

I got a single entry tourist Schengen visa to Germany. However, my travel plans have changed since then, because my friends are going to Italy instead. I don't have time to apply for a visa to Italy, but I have been told that I can use my Schengen visa to enter Italy. Is that true? This is true. A single entry into the zone occurs when a person ...


6

I'll give you some of my personal experience as a white American citizen living in France on a long-stay working Visa. Standard disclaimers apply, and this isn't legal advice. Firstly, I wouldn't worry too much about border checks coming into France, and not at all while traveling in the Schengen area after you have already entered the country. Border ...


6

It is impossible to say. Granting or denying a visa is often a subjective decision made by a consular employee and not based on well-defined rules leading to a 'yes' or 'no' decision. Assuming that you have enough savings to finance your holiday, in case of a Schengen visa you are required to produce further documentation, e.g.: 'information enabling an ...


6

I assume that you're actually a citizen of Australia, not just a resident, since that seems to be the interpretation under which the rest of the question makes the most sense. If that assumption is incorrect, please leave a comment on this answer, and I will change it as appropriate. The UK residence permit has no bearing on your ability to spend time in ...


6

There's no such thing as an "entry tourist stamp", only a Schengen entry stamp or a Schengen exit stamp; third-state nationals get the same stamp no matter what their basis for entering is. (With the single exception of EEA family members holding an Article 10 card, with is not relevant for you). You do not need to cross borders in order to go from a stay ...


5

This is taken up in Article 15 of Regulation (EC) # 810/2009 (otherwise known as the 'Schengen Visa Code'), which says... The insurance shall be valid throughout the territory of the Member States and cover the entire period of the person’s intended stay or transit. The minimum coverage shall be EUR 30 000. and for the case of multiple entry ...


4

The Schengen zone has (as of 3 March 2016) 26 member states. And despite Schengen being a single zone for visa and movement purposes, the responsibility for approving Schengen visas is factored out to each of the 26 members. Member state of first entry ... What does it mean exactly? A person arrives into the Schengen zone from outside of the zone, like ...


4

Yes, a residence permit from one Schengen country implicitly gives you the rights to travel within/through the rest of the Schengen area much as if you had a multiple-entry short-stay visa. You have to comply with the usual 90/180 day rule for days you're in a Schengen country that is not Denmark, but enforcement of this is mostly by the honor system since ...


4

We cannot possibly guess what your chances are since we don't know your particular circumstances or the data about you in UK or Schengen databases. But there are some things which can be said. Both the UK and the Schengen area welcome genuine tourists and try to keep illegal immigrants out. If the UK concluded from your application that you may become an ...


4

The Schengen Borders code contains several relevant dispositions. First, article 4 provides that […] By way of derogation from paragraph 1, exceptions to the obligation to cross external borders only at border crossing points and during the fixed opening hours may be allowed: (a) in connection with pleasure boating or coastal fishing; ...


4

As you probably noticed, there is no explicitly requirement to do so in the Borders Code and there is no other source that would be more authoritative. Another thing to understand is that the length of stay allowed in the Schengen area is entirely defined by the visas you hold and the relevant rules and regulations. There is no notion of being granted a ...


3

There are not different categories of Schengen short-stay visas -- there's just a single kind, which once issued is valid for both business and tourism purposes. The visa application form will ask you for the main purpose(s) of your journey, and you should answer that truthfully. From your short description it sounds like the business in Italy is your main ...


3

There is a reference per diem amount required to satisfy the "means of subsistence" requirement, which is €50 for Greece. So that works out to about €400 for your trip. But that's a minimum amount, you also have to show that you have a stable situation and that the costs of the trip you're planning is commensurate with your means. That's why it's best if ...


3

No perfect solution but there are a few things you can do: Bypass VFS, as the spouse of an EU citizen (because you wrote "EU spouse visa", I am assuming you're a British citizen and she would be travelling with you), your wife is covered by the EU freedom of movement. It means that she is entitled to get a visa under a simplified procedure, not the regular ...


3

Visas are valid until their expiration date (unlike passports which tend to begin to lose power up to half a year before their ostensible expiration date). Planning to leave Schengen on the last day of your visa's validity does puts you at risk of inadvertently overstaying, for example, if you end up stuck at the airport until the 4th for reasons outside ...


3

For border purposes, Sweden and Germany are located in the same "Country" (called Schengen), so he'll enter at Frankfurt with his passport and Swedish residence permit card and continue on a "domestic" flight to Sweden


3

Yes, you should -- as a matter of principle -- be as complete as possible about your travel plans when you apply for a visa. Not doing so is strictly speaking fraud and, if found out, can have much more serious consequences than the information you're concealing would have. There is essentially no risk that a few days of side trip on the way to or from your ...


3

I called consulate of country B and talked with the visa officer. He told me since you are visiting country A for a conference that is your main destination even though you spend more time in B. He said the rules say: 1. main destination 2. if no, longest stay 3. if no, entrance. He told me that he is reluctant to issue me a visa and asked me to contact ...


3

A residence permit does not make you a citizen, and other countries visa requirements are almost universally based on the citizenship of the traveler. So you need to apply for the same visas that everyone else with your nationality do -- except for very few and unsystematic exceptions. The Schengen rule that a residence permit from one member implicitly ...


3

I had to deliver exactly that some months ago. It is right what you described, and it makes not much sense at all, but that's what they want. A 'notary public' is a very common side-qualification, every office has typically one or two people that carry it. What you do is make photocopies of your (Green Card), the go to a Notary Public show your ID, and ...


3

Correct. The fact that Bulgaria allows holders of Schengen visas to enter Bulgaria does not affect the validity of the Schengen visa for actually entering the Schengen area. Your single entry will be used only when you actually enter the territory of the Schengen Area, which does not include Bulgaria. (And even if the Bulgarian border guards should happen ...


3

You have a type "C" single-entry Schengen visa issued by Austria for a student programme there. does that mean i can visit other other schengen countries during my travel? Yes, of course you may. A single entry Schengen initializes at the time of your entry into the zone and is fully consumed when you exit the zone. There are no controls within the ...


3

The embassy is more interested knowing whether you can afford to pay your accommodation costs for three months than the exact location where you are staying. The best option would be to have a preliminary booking for a short-stay apartment or the like for the full three months, complete with a cost estimate and proof of funds to pay for it. But you could ...



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