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21

Specific to Paris (and vegetarian food) : There are many Indian restaurants next to Gare du Nord, on Rue du Faubourg Saint-Denis, which has a significant Tamil presence. Passage Brady has many Indian restaurants too. Quality can vary, but I specifically recommend two restaurants, Sangeetha and Saravana Bhavan, both Chennai-based south Indian vegetarian ...


14

In big cities like that, you could probably find an Indian or a few Indian restaurants (if you know where they are), although I'm not sure about all of them. I suggest googling for Indian restaurants in these cities and look where they are, as they won't have one on every corner. Quality: don't expect it will (always) be the actual same food as in India ...


13

Yes, Switzerland is part of the Schengen area, so you will have no trouble traveling there, provided you remain within your 90 days of 180. You will still see border checkpoints for commercial traffic, as Switzerland is not part of the EEA, but you should not be affected.


8

When I left the UK to live in germany I missed Indian food more than anything. These days it's easy: Google is your friend. There are Indian restaurants everywhere. If you check out Trip Advisor you will even get reviews, though they are sometimes suspect.


7

You get stamps that only mention the date and both the day you enter and the day you leave count toward the maximum stay. It's not 90 nights or 90 24-hour period or anything like that but 90 calendar days of (even partial) presence in the Schengen area. More generally, following the rules is entirely your responsibility. Border guards can occasionally turn ...


5

I've definitely eaten Indian food in Paris (was a few years back so don't remember exact location). Can't speak for the other places. But I'm sure it won't be like it is at home - they'll have adapted things to fit local tastes - it's sound business. If they only like spicy things they could try Moroccan or Turkish. But as they saying goes, when in ...


5

The airline was incorrect to deny boarding. In fact, there is no "longest stay" option. The rules do not give you a choice. Rather, the rule specifies that you must get your visa from the country of longest stay if there is a country of longest stay. The "or country of first entry" part of the rule comes into play only if there is no obvious country of ...


5

Yes, the Swiss Ministry of Foreign Affairs requires that photographs attached to visa applications are not more than 6 months old.


4

I assume you are a US citizen, based on your statement that you will fly "back to the US." Because you are a citizen of a visa-exempt country, you should be able to enter on the date of your visa's expiration. Time spent in Spain on a Spanish long-term visa or residence permit does not count toward the 90-day total. Therefore, you should also not be ...


4

The general rule for customs in the EU is that you're only customs processed at your final destination -- except if you leave the airport terminal at an earlier transfer point. Usually customs will be located right after the baggage reclaim at the destination airport, and there will be signs directing you to choose between green lane (nothing to declare), ...


4

As long as your blue card is still valid, you can in any case visit other countries in the Schengen area (that's most of the EU together with a handful of other countries like Switzerland and Norway) for up to 90 days. You can also visit Romania, Bulgaria, Cyprus and Croatia (EU countries that are not Schengen members yet but apply the same rules). Even ...


4

Yes, you will need a visa if you get off the boat. There are different cases though, and the UK government offers some questionnaire to help you. You do not get off the boat If you do not get off the boat, or to be precise if you do not cross the UK border control, then you do not need a visa, according to the UK government website. You get off the boat, ...


4

Whether you can apply for a Schengen visa in London depends on the rules and conditions of the embassy that will be issuing the visa. And which embassy to choose depends on the "main country" of your planned travel. So first find out which is the main country of your travel, then find the website of the respective embassy, and then look at the rules on ...


4

I don't know how diligent each and every consulate is in enforcing this rule but in principle you should not be able to do that. Here is article 6 of the Schengen Visa Code: Consular territorial competence An application shall be examined and decided on by the consulate of the competent Member State in whose jurisdiction the applicant legally ...


3

The issue comes up often and unfortunately, there is no perfect solution for this scenario. A multiple-entry visa would of course be a good one but those are mostly intended for trusted travellers who have been to the Schengen area before and have a reason to visit the same country repeatedly. You can always ask but you can't really make sure you will get ...


3

Per the commentary on your question... To complain about a refusal, you need to prepare your complaint as a letter and send it to the consulate that issued the refusal. If you send it to a higher authority they will simply forward your letter to the consulate. Complaints cannot be escalated unless the original consulate has had the opportunity to examine ...


3

You need an UK entry clearance before you leave Denmark or your carrier will refuse to board you. It does not matter that you have a Danish work permit, it is entirely governed by what type of passport you hold. For your question about the difference between 'visa' and 'entry clearance'. An 'entry clearance' is what they will put in your passport if your ...


3

In a nutshell, for every possible 180-day window, you can spend 90 of those days in the Schengen area, regardless of your start and end dates of the journeys. In that sense, maybe it's easier for you to think about it the other way around, like in every 180-day period there should be 90 days that you are not in the Schengen area. By leaving a 5-month gap ...


3

Since you're arriving in Madrid from a non-Schengen origin (Lima) and leaving on a flight to a non-Schengen destination (London), it's quite possible that you won't need to leave the international transit zone in Madrid. If that is the case, you won't be entering the Schengen zone, and not get any stamps, entry or exits. Whether you need to leave the ...


3

There are several approaches to this problem, none of them perfect: Contact the Spanish consulate before the trip and ask them what to do. That's the safest and most proper way but it could be a bit difficult to reach someone who can actually answer your question, especially if that particular consulate uses a third-party outsourcing company to handle visa ...


3

Assuming that as a foreign student, your primary source of income / financial support is in a bank in your home country, online statements will likely be your only source of documentation. These are usually acceptable, but be sure to print out the entire document. If you want to go a step further, you might try asking your country's Embassy in the UK if ...


3

In principle, you are indeed allowed to spend another 90 days in the Schengen area, because the time spent under a long-stay visa or residence permit does not count towards the maximum duration of a visa-free short-stay, see Does tourist visa (90 days) apply after a working holiday visa ends in Schengen countries? One issue will however be how those 90 days ...


2

Not sure what can or cannot be done but you can always apply. If the consulate cannot issue a visa for a technical reason like that, they should decline to process the application, which means you would get back your visa fee and the documents you submitted. In principle, they should also tell you that quickly. There is no risk of an actual visa refusal, ...


2

You need to pay a highway tax (about 30 Swiss Francs) if you plan to travel by car on national highways. Provincial (Canton) highways are not effected by this tax. The sticker is valid for one year (for example year 2015). A national highway can be easily recognized. The signs at the entrance and at the exists are green, otherwise they are blue. The sticker ...


2

The rules for Switzerland are almost the same as for Austria. The country is part of the Schengen area, which means it honors Schengen visas (or visa-free visit rules for US citizens) but also that the days spent in the country count towards the 90-day duration of stay limit for your girlfriend. Even if you often see border guards standing around, most of ...


2

The place to apply for a visa is always a representation of the the country you want to visit. (Or in certain cases, another country that handles visa application for the destination country. For example, the Danish embassy in London processes applications for visas to Iceland). The South African consulate issues visas for visiting South Africa -- they ...


2

As long as you stay completely in the Schengen region, you don't need to re-enter, which means you don't need a multi-entry visa for a flight from Germany to France. It's similar to a domestic flight, essentially there's no difference in terms of visa issues between flying Frankfurt-Munich and Frankfurt-Paris. Obviously you should make sure the number of ...


2

No, airlines don't generally pass this information to the authorities. Some countries might still have more specific records but there is no general framework or legal basis to track people's movements within the Schengen area. It does however happen in other situations, including for flights in and out of the Schengen area. Very often, for internal ...


2

Yes, it's a problem. You should respect both the validity period (“from”/“to”) and the maximum stay. It's perfectly possible to get a visa valid for a longer time but with only a short maximum stay. It's not OK to stay longer if you have already exhausted the maximum stay, even if the visa is still valid. Best case scenario: Nobody notices and you can ...


2

Yes, the immigration officer can see all the stamps in your passport, and can, at their discretion, refuse you entry into the country (even if you have a valid visa to enter). Further, some countries share databases with this information that might effect your ability to get a visa in the first place. If you just want to get rid of the overstay stamp, you ...



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