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8

First I am a Doctor, of Indian origin. I had some interviews in Germany, and the interviews was being organised by a recruitment company. They were taking care of my accommodation and my transpiration. They had sent me an invitation letter stating we invite so and so for interview and we provide accommodation and transport. They had not mentioned the dates ...


7

If you stay in the Schengen zone for 90 days, the only way you can qualify for an additional 90-day stay is by leaving and remaining outside the zone for 90 days. You can't be in the Schengen zone for more than 90 days in any 180-day period. This answer discusses the recently-revised rule: http://travel.stackexchange.com/a/21461/19400. Another answer to ...


6

It's not a problem. As long as you don't exceed your visa's maximum stay or period of validity, you can stay in the Schengen area and crossing internal borders (borders between Schengen countries) does not make any difference. In all likelihood, you won't even see a border guard when traveling between Belgium and Germany. Your visa will also have a specific ...


5

To answer my own question: when I was crossing the border from Slovenia to Croatia, the border officer asked me about the lack of an entry stamp into the EU. I showed him my chewed-up IDBUS ticket and explained that, apparently, the French border control sometimes didn't stamp passports coming from the UK. He asked me why; I said that I didn't know, and that ...


3

It seems the French consulate made a mistake or only considered the stay in France (that's 15 days + a 5-day grace period, for a 21-day stay, you would customarily get 30 days or more). You must in any event abide by the maximum stay mentioned on your visa. If you leave later, you could be liable for a fine and could also have trouble getting another visa ...


3

Norway, Germany and Austria are all in the Schengen area, so as far as visas and border controls go you'll be making only one entry (Kosovo to Germany) and one exit (Austria to Kosovo). Any travel between Germany, Norway and Austria counts as domestic for border-control purposes.


2

Yes. While you are meant to apply for a visa to your main, intended destination country, it doesn't really matter that much once you get your visa. There's nothing to stop you changing your mind about where you go when you get to Schengen. You can travel freely within the Schengen Area and leave from wherever you like. Once you leave Schengen (in your case ...


2

Sounds exactly the same as I heard from friends - showed three day return tickets for Canary Islands and received three day visas from Spain. I would not expect EU embassies to give longer visas than the return tickets, unless more proof or an explanation or a good EU travel history is provided. I think this is fair. Please ensure that you take proactive ...


2

The purpose of the airline checking your ticket, visa and passport is to ensure that they can legally transport you to your destination, and believe from that evidence that you will be permitted into the country of destination. For this to occur, you need to usually show some or all of: a return ticket, or exit ticket out of the destination country a ...


2

All of the places you mentioned with the exception of the Vatican and the UK are Schengen members. Based upon what you wrote, you would apply once to Sweden and your Schengen, if successful will cover all the member states. The Vatican is not a Schengen signatory, but is a de facto member without border controls in the first instance. It means any visa ...


2

You can travel to the UK, but having a successful landing interview may present problems. You're in breach on your Schengen, and this would need to be disclosed to the IO because it is a material change in circumstances (Paragraph 321 (ii) and (iii)). If you chose to disclose it, you will need to think up a good explanation in order to convince the IO ...


2

United States nationals can enter the Schengen Area for stays of up to 90 days and travel freely within the area, as long as their total time spent in all Schengen countries does not exceed 90 days in any 180-day period. So your son will not need a visa at all. If he leaves the Schengen Area (such as to go to the United Kingdom) whether he needs a visa ...


1

I believe if I book online and travelling to another Schengen country, I would not need to show ID and only the boarding ticket? That depends on the airline's policy (and to some degree, the gate agent's knowledge of that policy). The EU no longer requires that airlines check for their passengers' identification so long as they do not check in luggage. ...


1

In Spain, you are required to carry your ID at all times: http://www.rondatoday.com/carrying-id-when-living-in-spain/ So I would advise not to travel to Spain without an official ID document.


1

London should be fine as you are travelling to Canada with a valid visa. See also Is there a way to find out if I need a transit visa for a layover in the UK? Munich should be fine too. Turkish citizens do need a visa to transit there but there is an exemption for Canadian visa holders, see Do I need a visa to transit in the Schengen area? for all the ...


1

Assuming both airlines let you check in online and print your boarding pass, you shouldn't need to exit the international area, so theoretically you wouldn't need a visa. However, there is a possibility that the airline will not let you board the flight in the first place, since as far as they know you are staying in Germany, so you probbly should contact ...


1

We have a lot of related questions but I don't think we have one covering this particular situation. Basically, your type D visa is equivalent to a residence permit in the Schengen area. It can also be used to visit Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia. From the Croatian Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs: Aliens who are holders of: […] long-stay ...


1

All Schengen consulates will have a record of the refusal in their databases. Officers at the Belgium consulate might even remember it or have some file about it. Applying immediately for a visa under another category, without any change in your situation and without submitting extra documentation is going to look bad and is likely to lead to a new ...


1

As @DumpCoder already said in the comments, you will need a Schengen visa to visit Hungary. Having a Uk Business Visa could be helpfull for the Schengen visa application, but you will still need a separate visa. The company office in Hungary is irrelevant, rent-a-car companies have offices all around the world, but having a visa for one of them will not ...



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