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5

The thing that's illegal is to be present within Schengen without being entitled to. Passports and entry/exit stamps are merely a means of detecting if you're guilty of that -- but ultimately what counts is what you do, not what your passport does. Once you're a Portuguese citizen you inherently have a right to be present within the Schengen area, and ...


5

To answer my own question: when I was crossing the border from Slovenia to Croatia, the border officer asked me about the lack of an entry stamp into the EU. I showed him my chewed-up IDBUS ticket and explained that, apparently, the French border control sometimes didn't stamp passports coming from the UK. He asked me why; I said that I didn't know, and that ...


4

You can enter Switzerland and stay there, for 90 days, under the usual rules which allow visa-free visits to the Schengen area for US citizens. The time spent in France under your French long-stay visa do not count towards these 90 days, see e.g. Does tourist visa (90 days) apply after a working holiday visa ends in Schengen countries? However I don't think ...


4

You're supposed to apply for a visa in the place where you live when applying. However, once you have the visa, there's no requirement that you enter the Schengen area directly from the place where you applied -- it's valid at all the external Schengen borders and for all anyone knows you could be on a longer itinerary.


3

Norway, Germany and Austria are all in the Schengen area, so as far as visas and border controls go you'll be making only one entry (Kosovo to Germany) and one exit (Austria to Kosovo). Any travel between Germany, Norway and Austria counts as domestic for border-control purposes.


2

Sounds exactly the same as I heard from friends - showed three day return tickets for Canary Islands and received three day visas from Spain. I would not expect EU embassies to give longer visas than the return tickets, unless more proof or an explanation or a good EU travel history is provided. I think this is fair. Please ensure that you take proactive ...


2

The purpose of the airline checking your ticket, visa and passport is to ensure that they can legally transport you to your destination, and believe from that evidence that you will be permitted into the country of destination. For this to occur, you need to usually show some or all of: a return ticket, or exit ticket out of the destination country a ...


2

All of the places you mentioned with the exception of the Vatican and the UK are Schengen members. Based upon what you wrote, you would apply once to Sweden and your Schengen, if successful will cover all the member states. The Vatican is not a Schengen signatory, but is a de facto member without border controls in the first instance. It means any visa ...


2

You can travel to the UK, but having a successful landing interview may present problems. You're in breach on your Schengen, and this would need to be disclosed to the IO because it is a material change in circumstances (Paragraph 321 (ii) and (iii)). If you chose to disclose it, you will need to think up a good explanation in order to convince the IO ...


2

You are free to search for a job in the Middle East on a tourist non-employment visa. However, you cannot be employed on that visa. This is highly illegal and there are serious repercussions for both you and your employer. If you are on a visit visa and you happen to be offered employment, you have to leave the country and come back on a suitable visa in ...


2

United States nationals can enter the Schengen Area for stays of up to 90 days and travel freely within the area, as long as their total time spent in all Schengen countries does not exceed 90 days in any 180-day period. So your son will not need a visa at all. If he leaves the Schengen Area (such as to go to the United Kingdom) whether he needs a visa ...


2

Yes. While you are meant to apply for a visa to your main, intended destination country, it doesn't really matter that much once you get your visa. There's nothing to stop you changing your mind about where you go when you get to Schengen. You can travel freely within the Schengen Area and leave from wherever you like. Once you leave Schengen (in your case ...


2

You'll need to make an appointment for a personal appearance at the Embassy of Malta (call 020 7292 4821). Malta is a Schengen signatory and operates within that framework for tourists and business visitors. The items you listed will be part of your evidence: air tickets in and out, bank account details. If you are being hosted by a convent, they should ...


2

It seems difficult, for two reasons: You are supposed to apply for Schengen visas at the consulate covering your usual place of residence. The relevant regulation does however allow this requirement to be waived provided you have a good justification so maybe arguing that your theatre schedule prevents you from applying in South Africa would be enough. ...


1

Europe's a big place, so I'm generalizing with a wide brush here, but if you work illegally, you're likely to get exploited, the chances of getting busted are high, and the consequences are severe. First, if you're working illegally, you have no rights. You can get paid less than minimum wage, not be paid what you were promised, be made to work illegal ...


1

You can visit France, or any other country in the Schengen zone, on your Canadian passport; if you enter as a Canadian and present only a Canadian passport, visitor rules will apply even if you hold citizenship of a member state. So yes, the 90 day restriction and cooling off period would apply. For your last question, you do not have to go through non-EU ...


1

As a Canadian citizen (your country of birth is irrelevant), you can enter and stay within the Schengen area for up to 90 days within a 180 day period. Unlike in many other countries, the Schengen immigration regulations do not require you to present a return or onward ticket to enter the Schengen area, only that you can prove means of subsistence to leave ...


1

As @DumpCoder already said in the comments, you will need a Schengen visa to visit Hungary. Having a Uk Business Visa could be helpfull for the Schengen visa application, but you will still need a separate visa. The company office in Hungary is irrelevant, rent-a-car companies have offices all around the world, but having a visa for one of them will not ...


1

I believe if I book online and travelling to another Schengen country, I would not need to show ID and only the boarding ticket? That depends on the airline's policy (and to some degree, the gate agent's knowledge of that policy). The EU no longer requires that airlines check for their passengers' identification so long as they do not check in luggage. ...


1

In Spain, you are required to carry your ID at all times: http://www.rondatoday.com/carrying-id-when-living-in-spain/ So I would advise not to travel to Spain without an official ID document.


1

London should be fine as you are travelling to Canada with a valid visa. See also Is there a way to find out if I need a transit visa for a layover in the UK? Munich should be fine too. Turkish citizens do need a visa to transit there but there is an exemption for Canadian visa holders, see Do I need a visa to transit in the Schengen area? for all the ...


1

Assuming both airlines let you check in online and print your boarding pass, you shouldn't need to exit the international area, so theoretically you wouldn't need a visa. However, there is a possibility that the airline will not let you board the flight in the first place, since as far as they know you are staying in Germany, so you probbly should contact ...


1

We have a lot of related questions but I don't think we have one covering this particular situation. Basically, your type D visa is equivalent to a residence permit in the Schengen area. It can also be used to visit Romania, Bulgaria and Croatia. From the Croatian Ministry of Foreign and European Affairs: Aliens who are holders of: […] long-stay ...


1

All Schengen consulates will have a record of the refusal in their databases. Officers at the Belgium consulate might even remember it or have some file about it. Applying immediately for a visa under another category, without any change in your situation and without submitting extra documentation is going to look bad and is likely to lead to a new ...


1

Canceling the application should be fine. Getting rejected is a problem, but a cancellation makes no difference either way. That said, since they're unlikely to refund you the application cost, I would just go ahead and get the visa. You never know when the next business trip will come along, and having one approved visa will make getting the next one ...



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