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17

The purpose of the Schengen Treaty is to let EU/EEA citizens pass internal EU borders without having to wait in line to have their papers checked. This greatly simplifies cross-border travel and commerce since there are no delays. Earlier treaties allowed EU citizens to pass those borders without visa or passports, just with their national ID cards. Those ...


9

The working holiday visa is national visa ("type D") and time spent under such a visa in the issuing country does not count towards the Schengen short-stay 90/180-day rule. As a South Korean citizen you don't need a short-stay visa, so you should be okay.


7

Romania has not yet been integrated into the Schengen border-control-free travel area, so there will be passport control between Romania and Italy. Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schengen_Area http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/schengen/index_en.htm


7

Yes, you have to go through immigration and passport control when flying from Romania to Italy, but your passport will only be stamped if your are a non-EU/EEA citizen. If you e.g. have a Romanian passport, your passport will not be stamped when entering Italy.


6

Quite apart from the Schengen situation, your national ID card is enough to travel and even reside everywhere in the European Union, even in a country like the UK where everybody is supposed to be checked upon entry and citizens don't have an ID card. So you have absolutely no reason to worry.


5

That is an incredibly interesting question! I will presume you land on Feb 7 well well before midnight which is when your visa expires. Edit: I didn't realize what @phoog said that South Koreans don't need a visitor visa at all. This is written for those who need a short stay visa but not a transit visa. There are many. My interpretation of the situation: ...


4

It is implicit in a multiple-entry visa that subsequent trips will be more or less different from the first trip. For example, your second trip on this visa could be to another country, or another Czech city. Nobody is going to take issue with the fact that you've changed the place where you're staying. A hotel booking is not required per se; it is just ...


4

A Schengen visa can certainly be cancelled (technically revoked and/or annulled depending on the circumstances) and such a cancellation would indeed be recorded in a database… but you cannot cancel it. After all, you did not issue it in the first place. Also, why do you care?


4

As phoog noted, your flight to London will count as exiting the Schengen area. Leaving Gothenburg you will pass immigration exit control, and once again entry control in Paris. Your options in this case seem limited to rebooking your flight to Paris as not to pass through the UK (or any non-Schengen country for that matter)


4

Contact the Hungarian Embassy in Washington DC The ONLY solution to this is to gather facts regarding border entry and governance of borders. Contacting the Hungarian Embassy will allow you to share your story and the difficulty, you can sprinkle in some tears if you think it will be effective. You will want to find out Length of time to return Audit ...


4

You Schengen visa is valid until its expiry date. It can be used for more than one visit to the Schengen area if and only if it is not a single entry visa. Schengen visas can be single, two, or multiple entry. In your case, if you have a multiple entry 2-year type C visa, you can use it until it expires, provided you leave the Schengen area within 23:59:59 ...


3

There are no requirements to provide proof of onward travel when entering the Schengen area. What you do need is adequate 'means of subsistence' both for the intended period of stay and for onward travel out of the Schengen area. Each Schengen country has their own guidelines when it comes to the required amount of money. Iceland operates with a guideline ...


3

This is not a new rule. It is expressed in article 6 of the Schengen visa code. If you have a justification for applying outside your country of residence, the consulate can consider the application. The justification has to be significant, though. For example if you left Australia not planning to travel to Europe and then changed your plans, you would ...


3

It's perfectly normal to stay in several Schengen countries and arrive/depart from different countries, the Schengen area has been created to make things like that easier. You don't need to worry about the plane tickets per se but you do need to present a coherent itinerary. Explain why you want to go to both countries, what you will do there (with evidence ...


3

There is no cool-down period between visas but a 90 days in any 180 day maximum stay rule, which does amount to a kind of cool-down period between stays. Note that this rule also applies across multiple visas, which is why no other restriction is really necessary. It's not a problem for you since you have only stayed for 25 days so far but if you had ...


2

First of all, your visa is not valid anymore, if you have exceeded the allowed period of stay (15 days). Even if different member states operate with different details in the implementation of the rules, extending your Schengen visa due to urgent medical issues (incapability of travel) should have been easily done, both for your wife and for you as a close ...


2

There is no regular passport control between Belgium and the Netherlands. However, you may be asked to show identification in either country. In the Netherlands, a residence permit ("vreemdelingendocument") explicitly suffices: ...


2

Given your itinerary, you will need to enter the Schengen area in Amsterdam no matter what (even if you had a very short layover and no intent to visit the city). Once you have done that, there is nothing physically stopping you from going to the city (there are one-way doors between the Schengen part of the airport and the luggage claim area and exits but ...


2

If you have valid marriage certificate, the name can be different for you and the spouse. They have a right to have their own name as they would like to have.


2

Exit and re-entry at the German border is no problem, as long as the passport is still valid (even on the last day). Note that you need a valid passport at all time while being inside Germany. A minimum validity is not required (§ 3 Abs. 1 AufenthG). Please note that you are not allowed to enter other Schengen member states, which would require a passport ...


2

You should not need an airport transit visa from Germany for this itinerary. The German mission in the US explicitly says that you are exempt from the airport transit visa requirement if: If they return from the USA after having used the visa Further, Timatic, the system which airlines will check to determine if your documents are in order, ...


2

When you apply for a tourist visa, the officials try to determine if you are a genuine tourist or attempting to immigrate. Your savings and income are part of that question. You need enough savings to pay for your proposed itinerary and you need enough income to make spending that much on a mere vacation credible. Few people would spend a year's income on ...


2

A Schengen visa can be revoked. From the Schengen Visa Code: A visa shall be revoked where it becomes evident that the conditions for issuing it are no longer met. A visa shall in principle be revoked by the competent authorities of the Member State which issued it. So, as mentioned in the comments by Lily, you can inform the consulate that issued the ...


2

It is unlikely, that a reentry ban has been imposed on you, but to make sure, you have the right to apply for a release of information from the German Central Register of Aliens. The application is free of charge, but you need a notarized confirmation of your signature. Obtaining a residence permit as a father of a German child should be a formality. At ...


2

I would say that depends on your home country. Leaving won't be a problem. But you might get into trouble applying for a new visa in the future. In the near future something this trivial will hardly be a problem. But if Europe tightens immigration laws down the road it can potentially be. Schengen might also be completely abandoned. If it is, then it might ...


2

Not a problem as long as you got return ticket before 29/02 24:00. Just check if your visa has "Last date to enter", if there is no such condition, then you can enter until the visa expiry date.


1

You can appeal, but your appeal may not result in an issuance considering the reason given goes towards either: Documents your provided. Your interview. It will be quicker, and easier, for you to apply again and this time address the specific concern that was listed as the reason for refusal. In your case, you need demonstrate that you will return at ...


1

Being an EU citizen, I have no personal experience with this but the relevant documents (EU regulations, webpages from the Romanian ministry of Foreign Affairs – the later are unfortunately usually quite poorly translated) make no mention of any requirement to enter Romania from the Schengen area to be exempted from the visa requirement, but only to hold ...


1

Even though Romania is not part of the Schengen Area, holders of a Schengen visa can enter Romania without a Romanian visa, whether they entered the Schengen area or not, for 90 days within a 180-day window. Entering Romania will not count as entry into the Schengen Area.


1

Yes, you can just go on a train and arrive there. A Schengen visa allows you to travel anywhere in the Schengen region. It should be even less trouble with a multiple-entry visa, where it is expected that you will use it for trips in addition to the one you originally applied for. The Schengen construction is currently creaking a bit under the weight of ...



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