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100

In order to acquire a canonical question/answer about lying on Schengen applications in our TSE archives, allow me to offer the following advice. The strict 'party line' on TSE is we do not encourage deception. We won't do it, and any answer that proposes it will be heavily downvoted anyway. Deception can have disastrous consequences. It goes into your ...


21

Refusal on these grounds... One or more member state(s) consider you to be a threat to public policy, internal security, public health as defined in Article 2(19) of Regulation (EC) No 562/2006 (Schengen Borders Code) or the international relations of one or more of the member states). ...means you will require a law practitioner with a specialty ...


18

As I understand your situation, you've made quite the mess. You lied about the purpose of your visit on your first application, were refused, and now wish to apply for substantially the same trip, presumably without too much time in between, with a different purpose. That is bad, yes. So you're proposing one of two options: Admit that you lied before and ...


18

Instead of faking your travel plans, you should simply mention your situation when applying for a visa in Italian consulate, and ask them if they could speed up your visa delivery a bit. If you have already submitted your application, call the consulate and explain your situation to them. In both cases, be polite, apologize for applying late and ask them ...


15

And I'd hate to have my holiday ruined or substantial money lost! It is far better to have your (ill planned) holiday ruined than to be in the list of deceptive applicants known to EU. That information will surely be shared with US as well. Just to cover up a mistake, do not make use of any such advice which has enough potential to forbid your future ...


8

What you have is a common format residence permit. It looks very much like a Dutch national ID card (same format and general appearance, but the colours are different) and is actually a valid ID for many purposes within the Netherlands. It even says "Identiteitsbewijs" on the card itself, which is arguably a little confusing. What EU law calls a "national ...


7

Generally speaking, the advice is still the same: You need to get assistance from a lawyer. The fact that the original delay for an appeal has (almost) passed isn't very important, especially now that the premise of the original trip is not valid anymore. If needed, you can just restart the process by applying for another visa. The details depend on the ...


7

As I understand it, you have been refused a Schengen visa for the formulaic reason... One or more member state(s) consider you to be a threat to public policy, internal security, public health as defined in Article 2(19) of Regulation (EC) No 562/2006 (Schengen Borders Code) or the international relations of one or more of the member states). ...


6

Switzerland – while not part of the European Union – belongs to the Schengen area so you don't need anything else than a Schengen visa. You won't even leave the Schengen area (or, in all likelihood, see any border guard) before leaving Zurich.


6

It doesn't matter if you have a green card or not, what matters is your nationality. This list says Philippine nationals need a visa. You can use the green card to prove ties to your home country though! A USA residence permit (green card) can only exempt you from having to get a transit visa. This won't matter for you as you are visiting and not ...


6

As far as the regulation are concerned you can get a multiple entry visa valid for up to five years. You are still bound by the 90 days in any 180-day period maximum stay rule but if you don't exceed that, you can do as many trips as you want during those five years, paying the visa fee only once, with no extra paperwork. The trouble is that you can't just ...


6

The UK border is very tough. I can't give you a yes/no answer, but since you have already overstayed one visa, it would be perfectly reasonable of them to assume you are going to overstay a second one. If they think this they won't let you in. You'll be officially declined entry, it will be entered in your passport, and then good luck travelling anywhere ...


5

In general, border guards in third countries have no business trying to determine based on your passport if you have complied with the Schengen rules in earlier visits. Passports don't consistently contain enough information for them to do that -- for example, non-EEA nationals with residence permits in a Schengen country will routinely have widely separated ...


5

As I read it, the requirement just means you need to have been previously issued a Schengen visa labeled "VIS," which demonstrates that your biometrics are already in the system (that's the Visa Information System, which Schengen states use to share visa data and biometrics), whether or not that visa is used or expired. Since you gave biometrics for your ...


5

As someone who did the same as you did, you only need proof of insurance for the first trip (the trip whose details you provide as part of your visa application). The insurance must have a minimum 30,000 EUR policy and cover the dates of your trip. I have used https://www.axa-schengen.com/en and found it to be easy and quick. Assuming you get your multiple ...


5

You only need to submit proof that you have insurance for your first trip, cf. article 15(2) of the Schengen visa code: Applicants for a uniform visa for more than two entries (multiple entries) shall prove that they are in possession of adequate and valid travel medical insurance covering the period of their first intended visit. You probably also ...


5

Is the site broken? Unlikely, it is more likely that the consulate in San Francisco is not booking appointments at the moment. Attempting to book an appointment using the link you gave, gives a screen like this... And on this page we observe that French consulates use an app called 'rendez-vous'. So switching the location to Vancouver gives us this ...


5

The Schengen rules make essentially no difference between a valid type D visa and a valid residence permit. Either of them gives you travel rights similar to a multiple-entry short-stay Schengen visa, and time you spend in Spain under a type D visa or residence permit do not count towards your 90/180 day clock. It is completely permitted to travel between ...


5

You do not need a visa. The relevant directive is 2004/38/EC. Article 5, paragraph 2 says: Family members who are not nationals of a Member State shall only be required to have an entry visa in accordance with Regulation (EC) No 539/2001 or, where appropriate, with national law. For the purposes of this Directive, possession of the valid residence card ...


5

This is a matter that is not fully harmonized between the Schengen countries. Romania and some -- but not all! -- Schengen states are parties to the European Agreement on the Abolition of Visas for Refugees, created under the auspices of the Council of Europe. If you're going to one of the states that implement the Agreement, you should be allowed visits of ...


4

As a general rule, it takes 15 days for the response to an application (see this link); and as you need to provide your travel details the consulate is aware of your deadlines - this however does not trump their internal process. You don't get the visa after the interview, the date when you can collect the visa is given to you by the consulate or VFS. The ...


3

In principle, I don't see how this could lead to a refusal, i.e. a negative decision. I don't see any basis for that in the regulation and can't see what refusal reason would apply. On the other hand, it's perfectly reasonable for the consulate to refuse to regard this as a single trip. You are kind of stretching the definition of a trip to save yourself a ...


3

Curious but the other related questions while answer the question whether you can travel on a D to other Schengen countries (yes) does not emphasize this fact: the 90/180 rule only applies to the countries you visit. The country where you reside with a D visa does not fall under the 90/180 rule as you are not a visitor there but a temporary resident.


3

The Schengen visa application form uses "sponsor" in the following context: Cost of travelling and living during the applicant's stay is covered: [ ] by the applicant himself/herself [ ] by a sponsor (host, company, organization), please specify: - [ ] referred to in field 31 or 32 - [ ] other (please specify) Since you're not paying ...


3

The rules of EU Schenghen Visa want you to apply to the Consulate of the nation where you make entry or the place of maximum stay. Given that travel plans can change and as a tourist there are many factors that can make that happen, it is not within the realm of "deception" if there is no "mal intent". But it does mean that you are "squeezing" around ...


3

Yes, there is a premium service provided by VFS called "Premium Service Lounge". I have got an appointment on same date by this facility. It is really great service by VFS and everything will be done very easily. The Premium Lounge Service includes: Separate lounge with personalized service by dedicated staff Refreshments Faster submission of ...


3

Does having a UK visa, of any sort, help improve my chances of applying for a Schengen? Yes, having a current, valid UK visa is an absolute plus and lends credibility to your application. It is not a guarantee however, and you will still need a viable premise for visiting the Schengen zone; and you will need to submit a well-formed itinerary (along ...


3

How do i get a multiple entry Uk visa so that I can visit the Uk more often on my trips to the rest of Europe? All "Standard Visitor Visas" are multiple entry by default. You can come and go multiple times. Of course you have a landing interview upon arrival where you state your premise. I would not like to apply for a UK visa each time I go to the Uk and ...


2

You can certainly apply -- in the sense that the circumstances you have described does not require the Portuguese consulate in London to reject an application from you. The Schengen visa processing handbook gives this example: However, an application may be accepted from a person legally present – but not residing - in the jurisdiction of the ...


2

As far as I know, foreign students in Germany holds residence permit instead of Schengen visa D. Could you check once again? A Schengen visa D is a green visa label in your passport with type D. This kind of visa could be only valid for the issuing country (say the item "valid for"). That means in this case, "Deutschland". If such situation applies, you ...



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