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8

May be you will be interested in this data. It's old by still shows dynamic how easy is getting visa C in the Schengen countries. Portugal and Netherlands looks like the best choises. Data from here: http://ec.europa.eu/dgs/home-affairs/what-we-do/policies/borders-and-visas/visa-policy/docs/overview_of_schengen_visa_statistics_en.pdf Here is also file ...


8

Entering and leaving a country with different passports is indeed not advised. If the country uses computerized records (like the US), the entry and exit could conceivably fail to be matched and you risk being marked as an overstayer. If the country rely on stamps and checks passports on exit (like the Schengen area), border guards will demand to see the ...


7

Finding a lawyer is indeed the best course of action but we can't help you with that. In principle, your wife should have been informed of the grounds for refusal and the procedure to appeal. Furthermore, since you are a EU citizen, if you intend to travel with her for a visit, there aren't many valid grounds for Spain to refuse the visa and a marriage ...


5

According to the official EU website: In addition to their own valid passport or ID card, all children travelling: alone; or with adults who are not their legal guardian; or with only one parent may need an extra (official) document signed by their parents, second parent or legal guardian(s) authorising them to travel. You should first ...


4

First you should call to embassy and ask them about the reason of rejection. In common visa can be rejected if there was some errors in documents or not all documents was served to embassy. Also it can be rejected if your wife have some problems with the law. The only way to understand what happened - is to call to embassy, or write them an e-mail. ...


4

It should be possible but you would basically be looking at vacation rentals. You might have a hard time finding anything on the regular market. Even if you find something, it's not unusual for agent to ask for a fee (Provision) of up to two months rent when signing the contract, which would make the rent much higher if you only stay three months. On top of ...


3

The rules should be the same no matter where you apply. The fact that you did not need anything else than the marriage certificate is unrelated to the fact you applied from the French consulate. In your situation, any consulate from a Schengen country should deliver a visa quickly and free of charge if you are traveling with your EU-citizen spouse. Since ...


3

Legally speaking, you need a valid passport or equivalent travel document to cross any border of a Schengen state, whether it's an inner or outer border of the Schengen area. I can't find a list of equivalent travel documents for France, but the one for Italy only lists “exotic” alternatives — documents for refugees, for seafarers, etc. (Nationals of an EU ...


2

Out of first hand experience in two different EU consulates (Italian and Greek), they actually return the passport to you and on the visa issuance date they will ask for it and they will post it there. Italian embassy even reserved the page with a stamp before handling it to me. I can't confirm this on all consulates or countries but I guess this is how ...


2

A “type A” Schengen visa is an airport transit visa. You cannot travel to Paris or enter the Schengen area with it but you might be able to connect between two flights to non-Schengen destinations there. The Canadian visa might make the type A visa unnecessary but isn't directly relevant otherwise. Also, the validity duration isn't important as such but the ...


2

Official documents can be found on the EU website. In fact, there is no such thing as a “tourist” Schengen visa, the main distinction is between a short-stay (no more than 90 days in a 180-day period) visa and long-stay (national) visas. But you must always specify the purpose of your journey on the application form. In fact, the standard application form ...


2

Applying should be OK, if there is no overlap between the visas. Otherwise, you can go to a consulate from the country that issued the first visa and have it cancelled before applying for a new one. What is definitely not OK (and perhaps the source of the confusion you found on the web) is having two visas with overlapping validity. Thus, if you had to ...


1

No, it makes no difference. Only your port of entry is tracked: since there are no more border controls within Schengen, the EU has no way of knowing where you went after arrival. Update: However, you are supposed to apply at the embassy for the country where you spend the most time. If that's France, great; if not, you might be better off applying ...


1

I am a bit surprised that the Dutch consulate would not cancel the visa but you can definitely apply for a new visa from the Spanish consulate and combine two visas to cover your trip. This particular scenario is even offered as an example in the Handbook for the processing of visa applications and the modification of issued visas Example: A Moroccan ...


1

According to this document, you do not need a transit visa. This is because you stay in the transit zone (Croatia is not a Schengen member) and as a South-African you do not feature on the list of countries which need a transit visa: Afghanistan Kamerun Äthiopien Kongo (dem. Republik) Bangladesch Nigeria Eritrea Pakistan Ghana ...


1

The requirements of a non-EU citizen may depend on local country law, but you should assume that only a passport will be accepted. For Germany, I unfortunately must tell you that only a passport is acceptable and that airports and train stations are used extensively for “racial profiling”. That means essentially that police looks for someone looking foreign ...


1

By law most EU nations require all people to carry photo ID at all times and present it to police when requested. There's usually a hefty fine for failure to be able to do so. And possibly a trip to a police station for fingerprinting and other means of trying to find out who you are. While it's not common for police to be around, even when you need them, ...


1

I was asked for my passport on the Metz, France train station while leaving for Luxembourg. Note: This was NOT ON the train but simply on the station because I was clearly a foreigner. This was an anomaly, I would believe. I have moved around quite a bit in Europe. Always carry my passport with me, but not for this specific reason, and have never been ...


1

No special visa for the purpose of studying required. Of course, you're not able to get a job and work officially. The purpose of a visa is necessary in the case of a long-term (over 90 days) visa. From my experience, I had a 90-day EU visa and was able to visit a 6-week intensive language course. After that I was travelling to EU several times without the ...


1

Yes, it should be possible as this particular scenario is even offered as an example in the Handbook for the processing of visa applications and the modification of issued visas Example: A Moroccan lawyer representing a gender equality NGO who frequently participates in meetings in various Member States holds a multiple-entry-visa which expires on ...


1

The European Commission has a calculator as well, available in a “pop-over” from this page about Border Crossing. It comes with no guarantees (from the user's guide: “The calculator is a helping tool only”) and presumably gives the same results as other calculators but it's from a somewhat official source so hopefully it's maintained by people who know the ...



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