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9

I've done a tour of the Salt flats in January 2010 which is the summer down there and even then it got cold at night because it is pretty high up - 3,656 meters (11,995 ft). I did a tour with a local operator as everybody else did, there are dozens of 4x4s out there every day. The accommodation was indeed very basic, especially on the second night. We ...


8

Most tours to Salar de Uyuni start from Uyuni town, you can get there both by train and bus from further north in Boliva. We took a bus from Potosi in the morning and arrived in the mid afternoon, at least 5 hours. Nice landscape but bad roads, our bus broke down twice. From Sucre you can go via Potosi, but I am not sure whether you can do the whole way ...


7

Actually, you can reach it easily from three different directions/starting points. From Chile, you'd be departing from San Pedro de Atacama. From Bolivia, either Uyuni or Tupiza. There IS a train, from Calama in Chile, but it's so unreliable and nobody knew if it was even running. Although while driving from Uyuni to La Paz at night, I did see it going ...


5

Short answer: You really can't. Long answer: The most direct way (ie not taking a Potosi bus and connecting) is to take just two buses. The first bus will be from Uyuni to La Paz. This can take 12-15 hours depending on the time of day, the bus company, your driver (some will pull over for a few hours to sleep!) and stops (some stop in El Alto to drop off ...


5

Yes, you can travel to Oruro by bus from Potosí or Sucre, and from there you can take the train or bus to Uyuni. As Peter mentions it can be hard to find accommodation in Uyuni late at night so arriving earlier is recommended. Oruro train station is on the road Velasco Galvarro slightly south of the centre of town. It usually doesn't open until a couple of ...


4

So there are two options. 1) You're planning on doing a Salt Flats tour, if you're going to Uyuni? Most of these run from Uyuni to San Pedro de Atacama in Chile, or vice versa, and take 3ish days. It's well worth it and you should consider that if you haven't already, as it'll make the next part really easy. Once you're in San Pedro, there are buses over ...


4

I also started in Uyuni, on a standard three day tour you spend the first day on the salt lake, getting off it in the evening, then going further south the second day visiting various lakes and rock formations, the third day you are going back to Uyuni. If you want to go to San Pedro you are dropped off at the border to Chile in the morning of the third ...


4

It will depend on how much time you have. Salar de Uyuni is HUGE (10,582 square kilometers), and not only you will need time to get there, but also to see the many different facets of it. Still, it is possible to visit it from Chile if you have enough time. You can get a train from Avaroa on the Chilean border, but keep in mind the schedule is not exactly ...


4

Unfortunately, I don't think there's many options in Uyuni for accommodation. I slept in the same place Peter mentions, and I was honestly anxious when it began to get colder and colder outside. The 'common area' was fine though, the tour guides (a really nice couple) gave us some sleeping bags and there were also blankets in the room. It might be because ...


3

By bus, the easiest is going to be a stop in La Paz, Bolivia. You have two options from Puno. The direct - through the border and round the south side of Lake Titicaca to La Paz. It doesn't take that long - about 5 hours from memory, although I've heard it can take 8. Option B is the ferry through to Copacobana. It's meant to be quite the experience, but ...


1

You can go on a tour from San Pedro de Atacama (in Chile) which takes 3/4 days, visits sites in both Chile and Bolivia and will get you back to San Pedro, for about 200USD. As an alternative, you can get a bus from Calama to Uyuni, which takes 7-9 hours, depending on border formalities, while the bus only runs by day and only on 4 days a week. The ticket is ...


1

You can get there from Sucre, Potosí or Tupiza. They also have an airport so you have the option of flying in. Source: I live in Tarija. I give tours of Tarija.



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