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16

As owner of a yacht there is no problem. I have been in contact with Bobby Schenk, a well-known German open-sea sailor who writes about problems on board, in your case firearms. As owner of your boat the relevant law for possessing and storing weapons is your country of origin, in your case USA, more specifically your state law. I suppose you have all ...


16

Besides marinas there are several websites/forums you can search: Sailnet Cruisers Forum There are also “professional” websites that list ads like: Crew Seekers Find a crew Some of the websites require that you pay a fee. Anyway, as I commented before you may be required to have skills. Nevertheless make sure that the crew (and the captain) are also ...


16

A friend did something similar, where he kayaked from Vancouver, Canada to Alaska. Turns out you need to report in the same day you arrive. He was tired and slept that night, and the next day went to check in. Naturally there was a) no record of him leaving Canada and b) he'd been on US soil for 24 hours as an illegal alien. They sent him packing and ...


13

I am assuming you don't have much experience at sea by the question. First of all, be careful. The duration of a crossing depends of your boat and luck with the weather. You can be lucky and get a nice 20 Knots wind, or unlucky having 0 Knots or worse 30 knots or above. You should check the dominant wind and direction on the route you want and their ...


10

You can't really count on Harbor Masters knowing English although International Maritime Organization mandates at the very least a basic proficiency in English and knowledge of Standard Marine Navigational Vocabulary for all people responsible for communicating to ships at sea or ports. In addition to this I have found Standard Marine Communication Phrases ...


9

I think you need to radio the authorities when you near the port and they will give you instructions. They will either send a boat to meet you or tell you where to dock. Before leaving your home country, you should be in touch with the embassy or consulate of each country you plan to visit to obtain any necessary visas and also to ask about their policy on ...


9

Your sailing boat (assuming it is properly registered) has the same rights and responsibilities as any other ship, up to and including a cruise liner or supertanker. As long as you fly a yellow Q flag when you enter territorial waters and keep it flying for a reasonable period, it's up to Customs to come and inspect your boat and papers. If you are passing ...


9

The best options you have is looking for sail boats requiring a crew. You should be careful with that. Make sure the captain is experienced enough. Cape horn is not known by being easy. But you're aware of that probably. They will, most likely, be looking for someone with experience as well. Things can go in many ways. It's not easy to get a good crew ...


9

My father did Liverpool - Azores - Halifax in a 26 foot wooden sailboat (a Thames Bawley, mahogany) in 1984 with a total crew of 3. Liverpool - Azores took 17 days; Azores - Halifax took 21. (They spent a week in the Azores resupplying and changing some of the crew since taking 6 weeks vacation to be part of something like this is quite a challenge.) BTW he ...


8

First the general route to get to Europe over South America with sails: You start at the East or North Coast, move over the West Indies, go north to the USA, move northeast with the Gulf Stream and if you get far enough to the north, you have wind from the west and you can cross the Atlantic. Now you are in Chile and this is really the absolutely worst ...


8

Disclaimer: I have no real experience in crossing the atlantic, what follows is an educated guess. . Looking at the map for ocean currents, I think that finding a sailing boat heading for Europe in southern-South America will be quite difficult. [source: wikimedia As a sailor it would only make sense to follow the currents, which means that crossing from ...


8

As stated by Karlson, there are some mandates about basic proficiency in English, but the reality can be something quite different. Some years ago I was sailing from Sicily to Croatia and visited several harbours on the southern shore of Italy. I didn't find many places where officials would understand a word of English (or Finnish, my native tongue ;-) ), ...


7

It might actually be dangerous to answer this question. It sounds innocuous, like "How long would it take me to drive from New York to San Francisco?", but any answer to that question can assume that the driver knows how to cross mountain ranges and deserts safely, and that if the car breaks down it can be fixed by a mechanic. Telling somebody who doesn't ...


7

Take this view of Tokyo Harbor. Scan around the coastline. You will notice that a vast majority of the property on the ocean is occupied by things related to: Manufacturing (Oil, Chemical, Petrochemical especially) Shipping (Warehouses, Ports, Airports, etc.) As you can tell by the coastline, a lot of land gets created artificially to increase the amount ...


6

Your best bet is on a site like findacrew. I've had a friend do it this way - she overlanded from London to NZ, and used findacrew for the ocean parts inbetween. Generally there are categories of sailors on it - from beginner to expert, and as you've mentioned, you're already skilled. This will give you a considerable advantage. Thinking about it, ...


6

There have been various attempts to introduce ‘simplified marine English’ (the commonest is Seaspeak), but the reality is that you don't need to pass any exams, in language or anything else, to become a fisherman, lifeboatman, or (in some places) harbourmaster. English is more widely understood at sea than in the world in general, for a variety of reasons; ...


5

"tall ships" is the magic google-incantation. Jubilee Sailing Trust Classic Sailing Tall Ships Youth Trust The ships are probably more modern than you want.


5

Sailing is actually a pretty diverse field. There's a lot to learn, and a lot of choices to make about what to learn. E.g. Racing or cruising? Big boats or small boats? Keel boats or catamarans? Solo or crew? That being said, you should be able to find an introductory crew course that will fit into 2 days. One day is likely to be a stretch since it's ...


4

For reference, Tripadvisor has a review of it from earlier this year (actually several). It appears there are two options for boating : row boat for an hour (160 rupees per person), or motor boat ride for 40 minutes for 1100 rupees total. The motorboat can sit at least 6, so if you have a group this would work out quite reasonably. Further reviews ...


3

I'm far from being an expert in sailing, but being a native speaker helps when searching so this is what I came across: A 13 page guide in English from visitgreece.gr (PDF, 24.4 MB) CONTENTS Introduction Sail the Ionian Sea Sail around Peloponnese and Kythira Sail around Attica and Saronikos Gulf Sail through the Cyclades Sail through the Sporades Sail ...


2

As you point out yourself, this is rather impossible to answer constructively and satisfyingly; there are just too many undefined paramaters involved. Still, purely theoretically, it's probably hard to beat the cumulative cost of traveling by campervan. Sure, fuel is more pricey, but as it provides accommodation while allowing you to cook yourself, assuming ...


2

It appears from @KateGregory's research there are no longer any original ships of the line sailing in Britain or the world. I have found there is a 6th rate ship of the line(frigate) replica named the Grand Turk which is still sailing, used in the ITV series of Hornblower. Also of interest for Australians and New Zealanders, there is a replica of HMS Bark ...


2

In Sydney at present, they're advertising the historic Tall Ship - James Craig, as sailable for a day. It's technically a barque, but is the original fully restored real deal - one of only four still sailing in the world - originally called the Clan Macleod.


2

I can only agree with some of the others here. Sailing south of South America is a very demanding route. I've been in Antarctica with my own boat and are now heading back from Uruguay/Buenos Aires. I'm looking for crew and I get some proposals. Mostly from people with just that 'a bit romantic' touch: I have no experience and no money, but I work hard' ...


1

Don't do it. As long as you stay within American waters, you are ok (I suggest keeping a copy of your gun permit with you). While you are in international waters, you are probably still ok. However as soon as you cross a border into any other country, you are bound by laws of that country. If by the laws of those countries you are not allowed to ...


1

There are several travel golf bags that will protect your clubs in the hold, as bags can get thrown around quite a bit. For example, Bagboy has two hard-cases. Hard cases are recommended over soft as some airlines won't pay for damage caused to clubs in soft cases. If you want a cheap option, some pvc piping to protect the clubs, wrapped inside a soft bag ...


1

If you are sailing in northern Greece then the blog on Puresailing has a lot of info about sailing. http://puresailing.gr/category/blog/ as well as the sailing areas at http://puresailing.gr/sailing-areas/



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