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11

I have not "trekked" through the Balkans but I have cycled unaccompanied with no support through Croatia, Bosnia, Montenegro, Albania and Macedonia and found the people very friendly and helpful and the overall experience 'safe'. Although my description of safe may differ from yours. I stayed in a hostel/b&b for one night in Podgorica but the rest of ...


11

You should go. I've never been to Montenegro, but I have been to various places in Dalmatia, and I have spent a good deal of time in and around Sarajevo, where my mother in law lives. I'm not sure exactly what you mean by "trekking" (and I have no idea what you mean by "integrist"). Land mines are a problem in Bosnia, but the problem is dwindling, thanks ...


0

I don't know very much about how it would work with an Israeli passport, but I lived in Israel for a few months with a US Passport. We participated in a few tours that took us into Zone B and I think Zone A. I confess that I don't know if those tours were pre-screened or arranged with the government, but we never had to produce our passports.


1

In one sentence: absolutely go for it! Traveling alone has the advantage that you can always decide yourself what to do, and won't have to compromise..on the other hand, you're very likely to find people to travel with...this will provide invaluable input like destinations or sights you haven't thought about.. As far as security is concerned, don't worry... ...


4

Tell your Mom to not base her ideas about foreign countries on Hollywood movies such as "Taken". That's quite xenophobic, frankly speaking. Also, Europe is not a country but a continent of many different countries with different cultures and standards. And these countries themselves are not culturally homogenous - they have cities, towns, villages, ...


1

My opinion as a 26 Your old from the UK is this. Take a map and a good book. Dont worry about getting lost, injured, robbed etc, and don't rely technology like GPS to take you everywhere. A lot of the charm of travelling for me is the adventure and the getting lost and finding incredible places on backstreets that you would never see if you weren't lost. ...


13

One thing I haven't heard anyone else mention is your clothes. You can help avoid being singled out by pickpocketers by not dressing like a naive American. For example, don't wear shorts, sleeveless shirts, baseball hats, or even tennis shoes. Get a GOOD pair of nice walking shoes; if you can buy them over there even better. Nice slacks, with a belt, ...


8

it's GREAT to hear of young people getting out there and doing things. You literally couldn't be safer. You've listed the safest possible countries to visit. (Maybe Japan would be in the list, I can't think of anywhere else safer.) (Maybe Monaco??) So that's a non-issue. My advice, I would actually encourage you to STAY IN ONE SPOT and really get to know ...


5

In the UK, it's pretty commonplace for Students leaving High School at 18 to go travelling on their own in Europe - especially as part of a 'gap' year before going on to University. Having said which most 18 year olds will go with one or two friends. As the whole thing is more enjoyable if you share the experience. But there are pros and cons to going ...


6

If you use common sense, you should have not a problem at all. Being an Eagle Scout, I assume you are from the USA. Europe is in many aspects as safe or safer than the USA, I suspect there are too many movies like Taken which portray Europe as dangerous. I think your most important problem will be money. Life is relatively expensive in Europe, so for ...


0

Pick up an international phone to use on travel. Europe has carriers where you just pick up a SIM card or top it off. If you have a current carrier, you can consider a global plan from them but be advised that typical charges on voice can be upwards of $2/min and then one needs to be weary of data charges. One colleague of mine visited England on business, ...


4

I hitchhiked around in France when I was 21 and only spoke basic French. No problems whatsoever. Regarding France (and probably other southern European countries, but less so in nothern Europe), as a single girl/women, picking up a map (or using a map app in a smartphone in an obvious way) in Paris and other major French cities in the evening or night is a ...


10

Here's a little data about the UK which will hopefully ease your security concerns: London is one of the safest big cities in the world. It was ranked number 12 in personal safety by the Economist Intelligence Unit in their 2015 Safe Cities Index (see page 33 of ...


5

Yes, you can do this. I did almost exactly what you were talking about when I was 18, quite a few years ago. It's mostly extremely safe, but there are some potential places or people which might be possibly a problem, though you should be able to avoid most or all of those. I almost always felt completely safe, or at least able to deal with the situations I ...


10

Feasible, and highly recommended. I traveled alone for the whole year when I was 18 -- and not just around Europe, but also South and Central America, Central Asia, and North Africa. The biggest lesson I learned was that people everywhere are pretty much the same. One of the things that means is that if you have common sense in the US, it'll apply ...


25

You are 18 and travelling to Europe for the first time and want to know if it's safe, and what other things you should be aware of. I assume you are an American or Canadian. I also assume you will be unemployed and with few, if any, demonstrable ties to your home country. Unforeseen Obstacles The first and foremost thing to be aware of is the likelihood ...


25

No problem, many people do it all the time. Rick Steves, the travel writer of the 'Europe through the back door' guide books did it himself and that was years ago. It's arguably safer now. Accommodation - hostels. Use sites like Hostelbookers to find accommodation (book early if possible, they can fill up). They're social, fun, and you'll find lots of ...


34

I'm not sure where you are coming from, USA? Cities in Europe are like cities in the US, there are business areas, residential areas, entertainment districts with restaurants & theatres. In general you will be safe in Europe but you should probably get a guide book for each country you plan to visit, guides such as Lonely Planet warn of the rough areas ...


1

For travel, you can buy special tourist train passes "EUrail" and "BritRail" that will give you pretty cheap train travel. I can't give you a good idea of price, since I'm in Europe and it's only for tourists. Many cities also have effective public transport bus/tram/local rail, with day passes available. Most cities are generally very safe, though ...


50

I suspect your Mom hasn't spent much time in the places you're planning to visit, because the notion that these countries are dangerous is frankly ridiculous. I've spent most of my life living in Europe, including Ireland, UK, France and Germany and have never been the victim of any personal crime. Maybe I've just been lucky, but if you want something a bit ...


6

I've been to France and Italy a few times and haven't had any dangerous encounters so far. I think that a lot of states in USA are actually more dangerous than these countries. People are actually very friendly, especially in areas profiting from tourism and will be delighted if you speak in their mother tongue. It also depends on what kind of landmarks you ...


12

Try out https://www.couchsurfing.com/ you will save some $, meet great people and get an experience of a lifetime. Europe is a lot less scary than your mom thinks, I lived in Amsterdam for many years and visited lots of the places on your list without any issues.


2

Rail safety in the US is a far cry from the images of the old movies. Just about all long-haul passenger operation in the US takes place on signaled lines protected by interlocking and under the watchful eye of a dispatcher at a desk (what's known as Centralized Traffic Control or CTC for short). The dispatcher will have a computer terminal in front of him ...


1

I am a little disturb about people's fear of shark attacks. Your odds of being harassed by a shark is something like 1 in 3,748,067 (+/- 0.0000267%) and to be killed by a shark is roughly 1 in 89,953,608 (+/- 0.00000111%) https://www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/sharks/statistics/GAttack/World.htm In period from 1580 to 2014 the Confirmed Unprovoked Shark Attacks is ...


17

I'm assuming you mean onboard. It's perfectly safe. I've travelled from Washington, D.C. to Chicago, and down to Austin, Texas (two and a half days). I've also done a bit in the Pacific North West, and from NYC to Phily. So I feel I can speak on this a bit. (I also did a LOT of it in Canada on a coast to coast trip, but that was split up with buses ...


1

One source of information about safety in foreign countries is your own country's Ministry of Foreign Affairs. They are in a good position to learn about many problems (from victims seeking assistance, etc.) and many of them publish “travel advice” for foreign countries. The tone tends to be a bit scary but it's one way to go beyond anecdotes from other ...


2

If you go to http://tripcheck.com, you can get the Oregon Department of Transportation's report on road conditions. In particular, the little blue circles on the map indicate "snow zones"; you can click them for information on how much snow is on the road, etc. Also noted are chain requirements; it seems that all of them are marked "Carry chains regardless ...


3

If you've truly never driven on ice or snow before, my recommendation is: neither. A winding mountain road is not the place to be learning. The first time you try to stop, you will skid, the first time you take a corner, you will be going too fast, and it's much better to do so in a place where the worst that can happen is that a tow truck needs to pull ...


0

I found a site which has a lot of information about plane crashes, including accidents history, statistics and events by airline. I checked for RyanAir and found just 2 accidents, (as @Kate wrote in her answer). The first one was in 1980, so if you consider that RyanAir is flying for the last 35 years with only 2 accidents, that seems pretty safe, at least ...


0

Ryanair as many other European operators is very safe due to high ATC & maintenance & crew training standards applied in EU in general. Accidents of such are extremaly rare last to think of Spanair crash back in 2008. Relatively recent AirFrance crash was related to extreme weather conditions and took place outside Europe so wouldn't qualify for ...


1

I will offer a slightly different opinion. I am a 6'3" and 220lbs+ white male and San Francisco is on the bottom of my favorite places ( I travel an awful lot ) somewhere in line with Amsterdam. In particular, I never felt unsafe on the (trolley) buses I take but the surface area of the 16th and the Powell BART stations make me very uncomfortable especially ...


3

Most park entrances are only open during daylight hours (6am to 6pm), so entering after hours might be considered a violation of park rules. I didn't pay attention to signs along the roads when last there (too busy looking for wildlife while my driver did the navigation), so can't say how well signposted the routes are within the park. But that could be a ...


2

I was there for Google I/O last year and the public transit seemed very safe to me. I used it to visit the touristy places like Fisherman's Wharf and the Golden Gate bridge from the Civic Center/Market St. area. Like the others so far, though, I too am a tall male. I would consider the public transit safer than walking, especially at night in some areas, ...


5

In 2011, US News and World Report rated San Francisco 13th best in the US for public transit. I agree with Vince that it's pretty safe overall but you might want to avoid certain lines, particularly at night. (But like Vince I'm also a large white guy, so...) Here's a list from 2010 of the top 10 bus lines for reported crime incidents. As a city resident ...


1

Every tourist takes a cable car. That's why the fare is triple the standard. (If you are into museums, there is a combined museum transit "City Pass" that may be worth it.) Personally, I like the old streetcars that run up Market Street on the surface to Fisherman's Wharf. Unless you come from the handful of cities with their own historic streetcars (=trams, ...


9

It is always hard to tell about safety because people have very different criteria about safety. Having used the public transportation, buses in particular, in San Francisco, including poorer neighborhoods, I would consider it safe. I am a tall white man though, so the feeling of security might be different. San Francisco buses are the places that show the ...


-3

The safer seat direction and position within the car will depend entirely on what kind of accident happens. If your train derails and hits a bridge, you want to be in the back, facing rearwards. If it is stopped and gets rammed from behind, you want to be in the front facing forwards. If it catches on fire in a tunnel, you want to be at whichever end is ...


3

I think what you're are looking for is an analysis similar to the one published by Vocativ, so if one looks at the analysis and one of the underlying studies published by Robert Thomas Anderson at University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign the safest cars would be 1-2 from the back with seats in the aisle in the front of those cars facing to the rear where 2 ...


1

Hasslers: cape verdean people never ever hassle tourists, they are extremely laid back people who will simply let you visit their shop and browse through the products and only help you if you ask. However, there are more and more immigrants from Senegal who do hassle tourist, they are a minority of the population but do have a negative impact on the touristy ...



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