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3

Human minds don't deal well with the statistics of low-probability events. Take a six-sided die and record a hundred throws. The chance that the first two results are both "6" is 1:36. The chance that there is another "6" after you throw a "6" anywhere in the sequence is just 1:6. Consider the recent cases: On July 24th, a Syrian refugee exploded a bomb ...


3

According to the 1968 Vienna Convention a vehicle is legal to drive in a signatory country if it is legal to drive in its country of registration. So if your car is legal to drive in your country, and your country has signed the Vienna Convention, you don't have to worry about local mandatory equipment you should not be fined for not carrying the local ...


6

Currently there are no travel restrictions I have heard of. Politicians are still undecided about what measures to take. For example the mayor of Munich announced that he thinks that more bag controls should be in order and that he considers a ban of backpacks on the Oktoberfest which starts in two months. So as a tourist you should expect that your luggage ...


2

If it is still painted in military fashion, then yes it will attract all sorts of unwanted attention. If you have spruced in up a bit with civilian colors, etc, it will still attract attention but likely more out of curiosity. Have you checked the laws of each country you plan to traverse? A vehicle that size could come with commercial driver license ...


2

I am the founder of the website CitySafe which aims to assess the crime and safety levels of large cities and countries worldwide (it’s still work-in-progress, but so far I have done c. 40 cities and countries). For my answer, I am referring to the page about [safety in Rio de Janeiro] (including a crime map).(FYI, Citysafe’s rating algorithm has assessed a ...


9

To answer your questions: People who arrived their place and cancel their booking due to unacceptable quality are unable to leave reviews. This doesn't really affect safety, as finding out the apartment is actually a moldy hole in the wall isn't dangerous per se. That being said, Airbnb is reliable in refunding misleading bookings. In many cases they ...


8

Some airline authorities recognise the exact scenario you raise. The UK CAA state: Young children and infants who are accompanied by adults, should ideally be seated in the same seat row as the adult. Children and accompanying adults should not be separated by more than one aisle. Where this is not possible, children should be separated by no more ...


-4

[Edited to include actual answer:] Safety is relative. Think about which person is more likely to commit a crime: an Airbnb host, whose name, address, and photograph are inextricably linked with with the victim one of the hundreds of hotel employees, who are wholly anonymous to the victim, who may not even be in the country legally or working under their ...


6

There are a few regulations towards passenger seating: All passengers must have a designated seat with a seat belt. Passengers cannot sit on seats designated for crews. Minors, elderly or anyone else deemed unsuitable or unfit (by the cabin crew) cannot be seated in an exit row. There are no other obligations or regulations or rules that airlines must ...


9

Assuming you're driving a regular passenger car, the list of mandatory equipment (Czech wiki link) for Czech Republic is: Spare spark plugs Spare light bulbs Car jack Wrenches Spare tire (or tire patch kit, if the tire is patchable; or neither, for run-flat tyres) Medical kit Emergency warning triangle Reflective vest So no, you won't need a spare tire. ...


6

I travelled to Erbil two months back. You should not have any issues but it is not advised to stay for many weeks. The same is not the case with Kirkuk and Sulaymaniyah. During my stay I was advised to not leave Erbil city because of possibility of widespread terror attacks. However, i am not sure if this qualifies for all types of trips. It is not a place ...


5

Of course your question is very subjective and there won't be a correct answer, but I want to give you some details on the safety layout of the airport in Istanbul. I went through the airport this January (before the bomb attack in central Istanbul) and as opposed to other airports that I have been too, there was an additional security check right at the ...


8

Your planned itinerary is too ambitious. You might make it, but might is not enough. Considering the uncertainty of hiking off-trail in unknown terrain, you need to have a plan that allows shortening/escaping if your route fails. I did my first trek in Iceland last year, in Lónsöræfi. I have previous hiking experience in the Alps, Swedish Lapland (Sarek, ...


5

It's true that there's been a lot of issues with security in Xinjiang over the past 10 years or so. There's always been a bit of tension between the Han Chinese people and the Uyghur people, but it wasn't until 2008 when things started to really boil over. The fact is, however, that as a traveler it's really not a big risk to travel to Xinjiang. Having ...


7

Yes, it does exists :) As I can say, night life in Moscow is much more glamourous, rather than in Saint-Petersburg there are a lot of small clubs, each with a small dance hall (there are big ones also, but not in such number as in Moscow). Many of them are located across Nevsky prospekt, so pick and go there :) One should note that the right company will ...


14

I have been to night clubs in Moscow, although last time a few years ago, so this relates to my own experience. Note that Russian is one of my native languages, therefore I didn't have to deal with the language problem (although I am not native Russian). It's often very difficult to get into very "high class" clubs, although not impossible. If you don't ...


2

(Disclaimer, I've never been to Russia, and only been clubbing (before and afterhours) in London, Paris, Barcelona and my hometown Montreal). I do believe that clubbing in Russia is safe, at least for the major clubs that attracts international DJs. See your previous post about language issue in Russia. If you feel that language is an issue during the day ...


14

No, there are no such districts in either Moscow or St. Petersburg as of 2016. Prostitution is illegal in Russia and locations which become too well-known to the public are frequently raided and shut-down. Obviously prostitution still exists, but it's not centered in any particular street or district. There are many websites online dedicated to reviews of ...



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