Hot answers tagged

105

You don't have to be too worried about it, since the aircraft is able to cope with this. People are instructed to turn them off in order to avoid some disturbances and parasite noise in the communication between the pilot and the airport. As electronic devices using radio frequencies, they could also in theory cause some troubles to some aircraft equipment's ...


74

I understand that logic doesn't always help in times of stress, but the first thing I want to assure you is that people are not going to run off with your things. This is something we all worry about but that essentially never happens. The folks who manage the checkpoint are monitoring and your things are not out there without you for more than a few ...


69

As a cabin crew member for long time, I can tell you that your responsibility ends by notifying a crew member, that's it. Let the crew members deal with it. This is true for all other violations, unless it's a life threatening situation that cannot wait, for example fire! Grab the extinguisher and fight the fire. But that's a whole different issue. ...


68

Airlines today charge for everything, including choosing your seat. If it's important, and a matter of safety, that your seat be chosen in advance, such as seating two people together, then you need to spend whatever amount the airline charges to ensure that. It's not a practical strategy to assume the charged-for service will be provided to you for free ...


61

Short answer: Yes, it appears you can, I wouldn't. Longer answer. I certainly can't find anything that would prevent you from doing so, there's similar threads over on FlyerTalk and Yahoo! Answers where people come to the same conclusion. Additionally there's at least one case of it actually happening. However, as noted it those threads and the comments, ...


56

I suspect your Mom hasn't spent much time in the places you're planning to visit, because the notion that these countries are dangerous is frankly ridiculous. I've spent most of my life living in Europe, including Ireland, UK, France and Germany and have never been the victim of any personal crime. Maybe I've just been lucky, but if you want something a bit ...


53

The Thomson Select A Seat page implies that you can purchase seats together for extra money. Although you may be re-assigned and, interestingly, their definition of 'together' is: Seats together may be across an aisle or behind each other. So that may not solve the problem. That page say Thomson follows the Civil Aviation Authority guidelines, from ...


44

You're fortunate enough to have never hit really bad turbulence. Although injuries from turbulence are rare they do happen. And from the FAA page: Why is it important to follow these safety regulations? Consider this: In nonfatal accidents, in-flight turbulence is the leading cause of injuries to airline passengers and flight attendants. Each ...


42

As a cabin crew member, I have first hand experiences with real turbulence, both anticipated and unanticipated. The story of asking passengers to fasten seatbelts is not about people being thrown off their seats only, here are the reasons: Flying people Passengers and crew can literally fly around the cabin in real turbulence causing injuries not only to ...


41

Next time, maybe swap seats with your son? Then at least you don't have to crane your neck to check on him - he will always be in your view. As for the danger of pedophilia: the preponderance of pedophile crimes involve a trusted adult, not a stranger. Going by statistics, your family members present a danger many times greater to your son than the stranger ...


40

I'm not sure where you are coming from, USA? Cities in Europe are like cities in the US, there are business areas, residential areas, entertainment districts with restaurants & theatres. In general you will be safe in Europe but you should probably get a guide book for each country you plan to visit, guides such as Lonely Planet warn of the rough areas ...


39

The United Arab Emirates (Dubai) does not care about your religion: it's not even asked on your landing card, because there isn't one! I've visited/passed through a dozen times and never been asked, and neither have I ever heard of anybody being asked. The only country in the region that I'm aware of asking for your religion is Saudi Arabia, where you need ...


38

This is very common in many airports around the world, someone who is trying to make a living by driving people form the airport and offering their services. Usually they are tourist traps and they will try to take as much as they could from you, unless you know how to deal with them. Their services vary, they can be taxi drivers, they do offer ...


38

IKeelYou's answer is excellent for the general case, but I'd like to add some specifics, since you mention this is in China. This guy was trying to sell you transportation service. This is a very popular way for people with cars to make money, because just getting tags (i.e. current stickers, registration, license plates, etc.) is both expensive and ...


37

Basically it is a warning of the potential for rock falls. Two warnings built into one, 1) rocks could being falling into your path or on your vehicle 2) rocks could have fallen and maybe on the roadway ahead. Your actions should be to watch not only the normal driving issues, but also keep your eyes out for rocks that maybe be present on the roadway or ...


37

Don't take it personally, that happens in other countries as well. It's not common, but there are hostels in the US, Canada, and Europe that don't allow people from their own country to stay there. So if it makes you feel any better, there are U.S. hostels that will happily accept you, but not a U.S. citizen. I ran into that once myself when I wanted to ...


33

Whenever you're planning a journey, consider if you really have to fly. I am Asperger myself, and I avoid flights (although not for the exact same reason as you). Between The Netherlands and the United Kingdom, there is absolutely no need to fly. There are three ferry links from The Netherlands to England: one to the south, one to the centre, and one to ...


33

Many "Western" countries provide travel advice to their citizens. To give some English-language examples, the US state department provides ongoing events alerts here as well as more general, less frequently updated advice about travel to a country. The UK's Foreign and Commonwealth Office also provides a very complete advice page for pretty much all ...


31

No problem, many people do it all the time. Rick Steves, the travel writer of the 'Europe through the back door' guide books did it himself and that was years ago. It's arguably safer now. Accommodation - hostels. Use sites like Hostelbookers to find accommodation (book early if possible, they can fill up). They're social, fun, and you'll find lots of ...


30

Offically the answer seems to be yes. There's no mention of bullet proof vests (or any item of clothing) on the BA information page or restricted items document. Equally there's no mention in the Heathrow restricted items page. However, I can see a great many practical problems that may be thrown in your way. Aside from the discomfort and inconvenience of ...


27

You are 18 and travelling to Europe for the first time and want to know if it's safe, and what other things you should be aware of. I assume you are an American or Canadian. I also assume you will be unemployed and with few, if any, demonstrable ties to your home country. Unforeseen Obstacles The first and foremost thing to be aware of is the likelihood ...


27

The ability to leave phones and small electronics turned on is a relatively new privilege with many airlines. And some flight crews still ask travelers to turn them off during take off and landing. During the flight, the captain and the crew under his command are the final authority and can impose additional safety restrictions if they feel them warranted ...


26

Yes, ships sink. Someone already mentioned the Costa Concordia sinking; ferries sink a fair amount as well (for instance, a South Korean ferry sank last year with the loss of almost 300 lives. On June 1 of this year, a ferry in China sank with the loss of at least 440 lives. In addition to deaths from sinking, there are also deaths from maritime collisions, ...


26

I have to add another very important point that is not listed so far: When you see this sign you should also avoid any unnecessary stops to decrease the chances to bet hit by rocks. This is in particular the case when you see this sign on hiking paths in the mountains. The sign is not only used on roads but also paths. It's not really a law though, but you ...


26

A few years ago I read a study about cell phone usage on U.S. domestic flights. Using RF locating equipment, they determined that the average U.S. flight has 2-3 cellphones left transmitting during the flight. Unconfirmed pilot anecdotes notwithstanding, if there were any significant risk of planes malfunctioning from cellphones, they would be falling out ...


24

Can't see how security will have a problem with a purely defensive device, but there are other considerations. Specifically: It is of zero value to you during the flight. Anyone attempting to hijack an aircraft today will be promptly beaten to death by the other passengers. In the exceptionally unlikely event that someone does get a gun onboard, and they ...


23

Your personal safety is not affected by your fellow passenger using a cellphone. In the US, the FCC (not the FAA!) has limited use of cellphones on aircraft because of the potential effect on cell towers on the ground. From an empirical standpoint, if there was a significant risk, it would have been observed many times by now as people frequently leave ...


22

According to this map from the Nuclear Threat Initiative (2006), your GPS reading at the western bend of the road between Rasht and Qazvin corresponds almost perfectly to "Mo-Allem Kalayeh: Suspected nuclear research center". However! This (ancient) page gives the site's coordinates as 36°26'05"N 50°29'53"E, which is a) a lot closer to where Wikipedia ...


21

Usually driving down a steep hill with narrow turns is more dangerous down than up for the simple reason that gravity will accelerate you going downhill. Going up hill gravity slows you down and your engine needs to work to overcome that which usually means that you're not driving fast enough to lose control, although the condition of the road may still ...


20

This is an interesting conundrum. Of course it's totally unacceptable to have three yer old sitting alone and I'm actually surprised (and sadly disappointed) that none of the other passenger would trade seats. It's atrocious that the airlines allow this. But then again, not all seats on the plane are the same and a better seat costs more these days, ...



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