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54

I suspect your Mom hasn't spent much time in the places you're planning to visit, because the notion that these countries are dangerous is frankly ridiculous. I've spent most of my life living in Europe, including Ireland, UK, France and Germany and have never been the victim of any personal crime. Maybe I've just been lucky, but if you want something a bit ...


51

Short answer: Yes, it appears you can, I wouldn't. Longer answer. I certainly can't find anything that would prevent you from doing so, there's similar threads over on FlyerTalk and Yahoo! Answers where people come to the same conclusion. Additionally there's at least one case of it actually happening. However, as noted it those threads and the comments, ...


44

You're fortunate enough to have never hit really bad turbulence. Although injuries from turbulence are rare they do happen. And from the FAA page: Why is it important to follow these safety regulations? Consider this: In nonfatal accidents, in-flight turbulence is the leading cause of injuries to airline passengers and flight attendants. Each ...


43

For whatever reason the subject comes up in context of the Bill introduced in New Zealand with respect to Maori. In addition to that the article also has specific information regading kirpan: The Sikh Centre brought to the select committee the need to be sensitive to the diverse cultures and beliefs of individuals passing through airport control to ...


41

As a cabin crew member, I have first hand experiences with real turbulence, both anticipated and unanticipated. The story of asking passengers to fasten seatbelts is not about people being thrown off their seats only, here are the reasons: Flying people Passengers and crew can literally fly around the cabin in real turbulence causing injuries not only to ...


38

I'm not sure where you are coming from, USA? Cities in Europe are like cities in the US, there are business areas, residential areas, entertainment districts with restaurants & theatres. In general you will be safe in Europe but you should probably get a guide book for each country you plan to visit, guides such as Lonely Planet warn of the rough areas ...


38

This is very common in many airports around the world, someone who is trying to make a living by driving people form the airport and offering their services. Usually they are tourist traps and they will try to take as much as they could from you, unless you know how to deal with them. Their services vary, they can be taxi drivers, they do offer ...


36

IKeelYou's answer is excellent for the general case, but I'd like to add some specifics, since you mention this is in China. This guy was trying to sell you transportation service. This is a very popular way for people with cars to make money, because just getting tags (i.e. current stickers, registration, license plates, etc.) is both expensive and ...


31

Follow the steps: Remain calm. Ask for identification before going anywhere with them or giving them anything. Don't sign anything without a lawyer present. If they start accusing you of anything, state that you require they then contact your embassy to help you with a lawyer. Generally if they're scamming, they don't want documentation or third parties ...


31

Is it possible? Yes it is, in most planes a pointed object (a pen or so) to be inserted in the small manual release opening in the oxygen mask compartment will release that specific mask. Are they released manually for sick passengers? No they are not, the seat oxygen masks are not meant for medical reasons, only for emergency reasons, namely ...


30

No problem, many people do it all the time. Rick Steves, the travel writer of the 'Europe through the back door' guide books did it himself and that was years ago. It's arguably safer now. Accommodation - hostels. Use sites like Hostelbookers to find accommodation (book early if possible, they can fill up). They're social, fun, and you'll find lots of ...


27

The ability to leave phones and small electronics turned on is a relatively new privilege with many airlines. And some flight crews still ask travelers to turn them off during take off and landing. During the flight, the captain and the crew under his command are the final authority and can impose additional safety restrictions if they feel them warranted ...


26

You are 18 and travelling to Europe for the first time and want to know if it's safe, and what other things you should be aware of. I assume you are an American or Canadian. I also assume you will be unemployed and with few, if any, demonstrable ties to your home country. Unforeseen Obstacles The first and foremost thing to be aware of is the likelihood ...


26

Yes, ships sink. Someone already mentioned the Costa Concordia sinking; ferries sink a fair amount as well (for instance, a South Korean ferry sank last year with the loss of almost 300 lives. On June 1 of this year, a ferry in China sank with the loss of at least 440 lives. In addition to deaths from sinking, there are also deaths from maritime collisions, ...


23

I work in an airline (cabin crew), and I know for a fact that there is no published list for such a thing. Beside the famous (bomb, explosive, hijack, etc.) words, which is usually said by naive people trying to be funny, the current political situations and international or national threats related words/sentences would raise a flag. Cabin crew are ...


23

Offically the answer seems to be yes. There's no mention of bullet proof vests (or any item of clothing) on the BA information page or restricted items document. Equally there's no mention in the Heathrow restricted items page. However, I can see a great many practical problems that may be thrown in your way. Aside from the discomfort and inconvenience of ...


21

Karlson beautifully took care of the international aspect of this situation wherein unfortunately you cannot carry a kirpan as carry-on on yourself. But, since Mr.Sardarji is a religious person and it is possible that he would like to make his family happy without making sacrifices with his beliefs I would like to provide more information with regard to the ...


21

Can't see how security will have a problem with a purely defensive device, but there are other considerations. Specifically: It is of zero value to you during the flight. Anyone attempting to hijack an aircraft today will be promptly beaten to death by the other passengers. In the exceptionally unlikely event that someone does get a gun onboard, and they ...


20

Realistically China Airways is as safe as any other major airline. That's not to say that there couldn't be a safety issue on them tomorrow, just like there could be on any airline - but realistically the odds are incredibly low. Historically (going back 15-20 years or more) they did have a relatively poor reputation for safety, however in recent years ...


18

I was born in Iran, am not living there, but have traveled a bit in the country. My Farsi (Persian) is not very good and because I grew up outside of Iran stand out on the streets. In short, I'm not exactly a tourist when in Iran, but I'm also not a local. In a few words, Iran is safe for tourists. This both from my own experiences and from the experiences ...


17

I'm assuming you mean onboard. It's perfectly safe. I've travelled from Washington, D.C. to Chicago, and down to Austin, Texas (two and a half days). I've also done a bit in the Pacific North West, and from NYC to Phily. So I feel I can speak on this a bit. (I also did a LOT of it in Canada on a coast to coast trip, but that was split up with buses ...


17

One thing I haven't heard anyone else mention is your clothes. You can help avoid being singled out by pickpocketers by not dressing like a naive American. For example, don't wear shorts, sleeveless shirts, baseball hats, or even tennis shoes. Get a GOOD pair of nice walking shoes; if you can buy them over there even better. Nice slacks, with a belt, ...


16

I've lived in Austin for about 15 years, so I have a pretty good idea of areas that are dangerous. Thankfully, most of the city is quite safe, especially the places where a visitor is likely to be walking around. The following crime heat map should be helpful: http://www.trulia.com/real_estate/Austin-Texas/crime/ However, that map may be a little ...


13

Try out https://www.couchsurfing.com/ you will save some $, meet great people and get an experience of a lifetime. Europe is a lot less scary than your mom thinks, I lived in Amsterdam for many years and visited lots of the places on your list without any issues.


13

Feasible, and highly recommended. I traveled alone for the whole year when I was 18 -- and not just around Europe, but also South and Central America, Central Asia, and North Africa. The biggest lesson I learned was that people everywhere are pretty much the same. One of the things that means is that if you have common sense in the US, it'll apply ...


13

To quote Wikipedia on Clear-Air Turbulence, under "Cases": Because aircraft move so quickly, they can experience sudden unexpected accelerations or 'bumps' from turbulence, including CAT (as they rapidly cross invisible bodies of air which are moving vertically at many different speeds). Although the vast majority of cases of turbulence are ...


12

I'm a fellow Sikh, and unfortunately there isn't much you can do in this situation. You will have to remove your kirpan and place it in check-in luggage as posted by @karlson. Some sikhs wear these small kirpans in their necklace, Others don't travel by plane at all. While traveling do remove kirpan. You should do ardaas before and after, Guru Sahib ...


11

One by one: Yes, Indonesian ferries are that bad. Overcrowding is rife, safety precautions are often non-existent, and the open sea can often be rough. As a simple example, Jakarta Globe's category "Indonesia boat accident" has at least 7 separate sinkings that killed people for 2014 alone, and see the links in this answer for some stories of a typical ...


11

Here's a little data about the UK which will hopefully ease your security concerns: London is one of the safest big cities in the world. It was ranked number 12 in personal safety by the Economist Intelligence Unit in their 2015 Safe Cities Index (see page 33 of ...


11

it's GREAT to hear of young people getting out there and doing things. You literally couldn't be safer. You've listed the safest possible countries to visit. (Maybe Japan would be in the list, I can't think of anywhere else safer.) (Maybe Monaco??) So that's a non-issue. My advice, I would actually encourage you to STAY IN ONE SPOT and really get to know ...



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