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73

The best tactic in India is to ignore beggars / paupers and keep moving on. The very fact that people give money creates a vicious cycle where people are forced into the profession by local mafia. Yes, you may think your alms to a small kid will feed him but it reality very often what happens is that the kids' parents or local mafia will take away their ...


69

I think the current usual solution is to get a debit card (or failing that a credit card) with low/no foreign transaction and cash withdrawl fees. (In the UK, the Halifax Clarity Card is the best for this at the moment) Then, when you get to the country, take out cash periodically. Not too much in case of issues, but don't assume you can do it too often as ...


66

I live in a very corrupt country - Ukraine. Let me give you some advice. First, try to avoid looking like stranger. Try to look like the locals. That is often difficult, I know. It's the only advice about how to avoid corrupt police. They often search for strangers just to get some money from them, because strangers are easy meat. All the other advice is ...


66

One of the steps of preparing the cabin for landing is checking that all passengers are seated and buckled up, and no passengers are in the toilet and toilets are locked (it can be [un]locked from outside). The reasons behind checking the toilets for passengers during landing and takeoffs are related to safety and security. The safety related reasons are ...


63

Before you leave, call your bank. You'll want to alert them that you'll be using your credit or debit cards overseas, so as not to trigger fraud alerts. Then ask them if there is a network in your destination that involves lower fees. For example, my bank gave me names of specific banks in England, Italy, and Germany and told me that if I used ATMs at those ...


52

If you do not look like a native, then you will be hounded by paupers/beggars. If you help one, generally onlooking beggars may come asking you for money as well. The rule to respect would be to ignore anyone asking for money - a conversation isn't going to lead anywhere. Keep yourself safe - do not make a display of your money. You never know who's ...


43

From EU traffic rules for pedestrians: If, at the side of the carriageway, there are pavements (sidewalks) or suitable verges for pedestrians, pedestrians shall use them. It is recommended that domestic legislation should provide as follows: pedestrians walking on the carriageway shall keep to the side opposite to that appropriate to the ...


41

For whatever reason the subject comes up in context of the Bill introduced in New Zealand with respect to Maori. In addition to that the article also has specific information regading kirpan: The Sikh Centre brought to the select committee the need to be sensitive to the diverse cultures and beliefs of individuals passing through airport control to ...


37

Well, if you want to know something about culture of other country, why not to try solving general problems in that country? For example: Try to buy food in a supermarket. Or even in a small shop near the center. Try to go and use a barber. Try to find a battery for your cell-phone Try to ask people where is the best cafe they know (this is a fantastic ...


36

I have had conference organizers remind us not to wear our badges out on the street. (For example in Barcelona, where everyone I knew was robbed or had a robbery story, including someone whose bag was slit in an elevator and laptop removed.) It's not so much because strangers will know your name (I am reminded of advice not to put children's names on their ...


36

All other answers are correct, but I think there is one exception: In a sharp corner with limited visibility, walk in the outer corner, regardless of traffic direction Source: Flickr, by Wally Gobetz, Creative Commons by-nc-nd. See page for more information. When you're walking here, it's safer to go in the outer corner, than in the inner corner, even ...


35

Basically, you can't. The world is full of GI diseases, even in developed, First World nations. There are some decent steps to trying to minimize your exposure: Properly cooked foods. Everything heated to a proper internal temperature (depends on the dish, check the USDA's site for guidelines), no sampling the raw chicken dish, etc. For fruits and veg, if ...


34

An american software engineer living in Japan gives a good overview of how big Japan is and why you shouldn't be afraid to travel there after the nuclear accident. Essentially, the summary is that Japan is very large. It's unlikely that your travel plans as a tourist will be anywhere near the accident. Source: http://mapfrappe.com/index.html?show=3057


34

All modern aircraft have to go through incredibly stringent safety checks and are essentially equally safe. Accidents are so rare that any apparent differences in aircraft safety are mostly meaningless statistical anomalies. Airfleets.net has a chart of accidents per aircraft type, but it's not easy to make any practical conclusions about it. For example, ...


33

Sure you can. Just go to the right gun show. Selling guns is hard for private citizens so they can skip all that background check foolishness. We've been unable to close the gunshow loophole in spite of discovering documents from Al Qaeda advising cell members to purchase weapons at gun shows. It's not legal of course but clearly no one's interested in being ...


33

In rural North America, roads without sidewalks (aka pavements) are common. In fact, so are unpaved (gravel) roads, and in winter roads narrowed by snowbanks. School children in Canada are taught to walk facing traffic: From colouring pages by Elmer. There simply is no debate. Not being able to see a car that has already passed you is irrelevant. Walk ...


31

I lived in London for four years. Perhaps I just didn't appreciate it, but I can't say I really was that aware of the class system on a day-to-day basis. Sure, you were aware that in Peckham in South London there tended to be a lower socio-economic 'category' of people than say, Kensington. And yes in Mayfair there were the private members' clubs and ...


31

Certainly not. As a foreigner who lived in the UK for four years, I definitely only needed my passport for international travel. I used my New Zealand photo driver's license initially for ID (eg, to get into a bar), and then my UK one. For opening bank accounts and others where you sometimes require two forms, then you bring your passport. The UK is not ...


31

Very simply, no, they can not. In order to purchase a firearm in the US you must be a resident of the state in which you are buying it, and able to prove that residency. As a tourist is not a resident of the state, they are unable to purchase firearms. There was previously an additional requirement that non-citizens had to have been a resident of a state ...


29

First, in problematic places I would try to avoid interacting with the police as much as possible. Another strategy is patience. Usually, corrupt police are just trying to make quick money off an easy victim. Tourists are an obvious target because they tend to have more money and are more likely to be unfamiliar with the local language and customs. If you ...


29

No, you can't. I know a lot about planes and their systems and I can tell you for sure, some tissues can block the toilet. I am sure your butt is a bit heavier and bigger than some tissues. Also, some planes have a manual handle to control the flush in case it is stuck open. It happens sometime and the only bad side is not sucking people's butts, but the ...


27

Many countries have travel advice agencies run by their respective governments. The US: http://travel.state.gov/travel/travel_1744.html The UK: http://www.fco.gov.uk/en/travel-and-living-abroad/travel-advice-by-country/ Australia: http://www.smartraveller.gov.au/zw-cgi/view/Advice/ France (in french): ...


26

From the UK Highway Code: Rules for pedestrians 1 Pavements (including any path along the side of a road) should be used if provided. Where possible, avoid being next to the kerb with your back to the traffic. If you have to step into the road, look both ways first. Always show due care and consideration for others. 2 If there is ...


25

First, it's not a binary you're-in-the-tourist-zone-or-you're-not kind of thing. There's a spectrum. Second, often the "real" is only 20 feet from the "for the tourists". Something as simple as sitting down in a park and watching people go by can tell you a lot. I like to talk to the hotel clerks. On my most recent trip (to Venice), the woman who was at the ...


25

There is no clear explicit rule regarding sleeping next to bulkheads. Why are some airlines strict about it? the usual "safety" excuse is used here and I can assure you this time the safety excuse is legitimate. In addition to that, passengers are only allowed to sit in "passenger seats", they are not even allowed to sit on crew seats, so this can be used as ...


24

I suggest you don't cancel your trip. I have been working in Athens during a period of unrest. I can't predict what will happen, but usually many people demonstrate peacefully, then a small group of a hundred people starts facing the police for an hour, then a few people start throwing rocks/tear gas, and run a bit. Actual violence is very local, like one ...


24

Non-airconditioned classes tend to have less strict ticket checks starting with the lowest class and gradually increasing till the highest class. Unreserved coaches are usually jam-packed with no place to sleep; you often have to travel standing even at night and not advised. Three-tier non-AC (three bunk beds in one 'column') and second class / two-tier ...


24

If you define safe as 'not contracting a water-borne disease', then yes, you will be safe from contracting typhoid, jaundice, etc when you drink tea/coffee from street-side vendors. Boiling during the preparation effectively kills of the disease-causing germs, even if kept in covered kettles/pots as they usually are. A dirty clay cup would not cause a ...


24

I'm afraid I can't find any government numbers to back up my anecdotal evidence, but Shinjuku, Shibuya and Ikebukuro are all very safe - much safer than their equivalents in London, New York or any other 'world' city. I've spent many nights in each, in varying states of sobriety, and never had any problems at all. I've lost my wallet a few times (on trains, ...


23

India does have a well-documented problem with sexual assault and harrasment directed at women. So I start off with the basics: Try to avoid walking on streets that are not well-lit. This can be more of a problem than you think because the infrastructure in sections of big cities and / or smaller towns can be bad. Know the emergency numbers. Police can be ...



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