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37

Passengers are prohibited from the car decks on ferries in most every country in the world. Vehicles can shift position in rough seas and injure people standing between them. And since a rogue wave can appear at any point in time without any warning, the ban applies throughout the entirety of a sailing.


36

Even in ferries where your coach stays on the top deck, you sometimes have to leave the vehicle. This is because in case of accident, the fear is that it will take too long to escape the vehicle and the risk of going down with the ferry is high. And it is not just for rogue waves, it is also for the ferry getting hit by (or hitting) other craft on the ...


8

Airlines and tour companies are usually not obliged to give refunds on travel warnings. After all It's not their fault. The only exceptions are if they are unable - or unwilling - to actually provide the services you paid for, for example it's so dangerous they won't fly to your airport. For any other circumstances you are expected to claim from your travel ...


8

The reason passengers are not allowed on the car decks on ferries is that it is illegal. The reason for it being illegal is of course safety, preventing theft from cars, fire hazards (people smoking in their own cars) etc. This is from Marine and Coast Guard Agency (UK) on ro-ro passenger ships. 3.1 The SOLAS Convention Chapter II-1 Reg. 20-3, requires ...


7

There is a night train-ferry across the Baltic, which (for example) leaves Germany (Sassnitz) at 23.15 and arrives Sweden (Trelleborg) at 03.15. The whole point of the night train is that train passengers are allowed to stay in their sleeping berth for the crossing, but they can also wander around the ship including the train deck. I suspect the difference ...


7

Selling something I live in Indonesia so I get it a lot. When they come at me I banter with them. I tell them (the taxi drivers) to find the taxi "over there". I tell them "besok" (tomorrow). Until they get confused and give up in disgust because their friends are laughing at them. My wife hates it but I have fun with them (nicely, with a smile). It avoids ...


5

I can't find any government advice from the South African government for South African travellers. As such, I'll point you to the CDC website, giving advice to American travellers, which only recommends "routine vaccines" - you can follow the link to see what those are for Americans. (With a note that you could also choose to get Hep A (rare but can ...


5

Yes, it is as safe as before. There is a lot of rubble in some coastal towns but the rest of the country is intact. Every major city , the entire Andes, Galapagos, Amazon and cloud-forests are just as they were before the earthquake.


4

Yes, you have to be aware. But there is no need for panic. Carry your papers with you at all times. In the summer of 2015, some roads and rail lines along the balkan route were closed because of refugee columns. For safety reasons, and also to discourage helpers from giving refugees a lift. Likewise border crossings were closed to legitimate traffic ...


3

There are no special vaccinations recommended for the UK, the basic recommendations are basically the same as in the rest of European Union and probably South Africa (but I am not sure here). For example take a look at: http://mdtravelhealth.com/destinations/europe/united_kingdom.php


3

It's specifically banned by the Maritime Safety Committee of the International Maritime Organization. (See page 20). It appears to be in response to the loss of the Estonia in 1994.


3

People on a bus inside a ferry could do all kinds of mischief. You'd have to expect that someone might do something totally idiotic like starting the engine of a bus and starting to drive. That's obviously idiocy of the highest order, but it could endanger the lifes of hundreds of passengers and crew, and you don't want to take that risk.


1

After a major earthquake, the area typically experiences aftershocks for quite some time. Every earthquake series is different, but by way of example consider the 2010 Christchurch earthquakes. The largest one (the first of the series) was a 7.1 in September 2010. The most destructive was a 6.3 five months later, in February 2011. There have been 65 quakes ...



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