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1

It ought not to be a problem. Your citizenship determines whether you need a visa, but once you have determined you need one, it is generally your current residence that determines where to apply -- that is, if the country you're need a visa for has any restriction on where you can apply at all. In fact it doesn't look like Russia is picky about where visa ...


1

The US State Department website indicates (updated after the executive order): The Department of State warns U.S. citizens to defer all travel to the eastern regions of Donetsk and Luhansk. In addition, Russian military forces continue to occupy the Crimean Peninsula and are present on the eastern border of Ukraine. It does not explicitly ban it, ...


3

As I'm posting this from a French laptop plugged into a wall in a Moscow apartment, I can confirm that everything works perfectly without any need for adaptors.


1

In case someone else checks this page. My daughter has been in Russia for 5 months. She was using her visa check card from her bank. Found out that between the bank and each transaction she makes she was being charged $15 a transaction. Watch out for this. She now takes out a large amount of money at a time. She will now be getting a prepaid card in ...


9

Yes, it should work. Electricity supplies with nominal voltages of 220, 230 or 240 volts are in practice the same. There are tolerances of about ±10 % in the voltage (to account for the voltage drop in transmission lines which depends on the load), so devices labeled with either of these voltages will actually be designed to function on anywhere between 200 ...


5

Yes, the socket delivers different voltage but electric appliances will support a range of voltages, and plug types C, E, F are compatible with the sockets. See http://www.worldstandards.eu/electricity/plug-voltage-by-country/


2

Since you are leaving the airport and do not only stay in airside transit, you will need a visa even though you're staying less than 24h - unless you're from one of the countries whose citizens are allowed visa free travel, see this wikipedia article for a list of countries. If you were staying airside in international transit and you're staying for less ...


1

Being British and living in Moscow fifteen years on and off I will say it is far safer than London (the city I was born and raised in). Even the Militsia seem to be approachable nowadays and Moscow has just gotten 200 Tourist police (50% speak fluent English) with many more to come. It's safe and it is awesome.



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