New answers tagged

4

Yes, it does exists :) As I can say, night life in Moscow is much more glamourous, rather than in Saint-Petersburg there are a lot of small clubs, each with a small dance hall (there are big ones also, but not in such number as in Moscow). Many of them are located across Nevsky prospekt, so pick and go there :) One should note that the right company will ...


0

As Volodymyr mentioned, the train is called Sapsan, Russian for peregrine falcon. It is a Siemens-built high-speed train based on the ICE 3 running in Germany and Siemens calls it Velaro RUS. Formerly, they not only served Moscow–Saint Petersburg but also Moscow–Nizhnyi Novgorod, but they were phased out of the latter in favour of Talgo trains in 2015. You ...


7

I have been to night clubs in Moscow, although last time a few years ago, so this relates to my own experience. Note that Russian is one of my native languages, therefore I didn't have to deal with the language problem (although I am not native Russian). It's often very difficult to get into very "high class" clubs, although not impossible. If you don't ...


2

(Disclaimer, I've never been to Russia, and only been clubbing (before and afterhours) in London, Paris, Barcelona and my hometown Montreal). I do believe that clubbing in Russia is safe, at least for the major clubs that attracts international DJs. See your previous post about language issue in Russia. If you feel that language is an issue during the day ...


6

Google streetview shows the wall segment here: Source: google maps An aerial view of the location: Source: google maps It can be seen that there is no gating or railings and the wall segment is on a public road with legal parking: Source: google maps Question: Is this area of the park accessible at night? [I]s a visitor likely to be ...


1

TL;DR - You can renew the passport whenever you like. In 2011 I held a 5-year passport that was due to expire in -- IIRC -- 2013. I was still enrolled at university at the time, which made me temporarily exempt from military service. Since males of the appropriate age need approval (a specific form) from the military commissariat for an international ...


12

No, there are no such districts in either Moscow or St. Petersburg as of 2016. Prostitution is illegal in Russia and locations which become too well-known to the public are frequently raided and shut-down. Obviously prostitution still exists, but it's not centered in any particular street or district. There are many websites online dedicated to reviews of ...


0

Different prices for locals and foreigners are (or were) common in state museums, because it is assumed that we locals sponsor them with our taxes. As for the sport activities, they shouldn't be priced differently. After all, even having separate web sites with different prices won't work if you use Google Translate to read the Russian version. So just ...


5

I'm just going to speak from my own experience while I was traveling in St. Petersburg and Moscow. Granted, I didn't go outside of the cities. I found that both areas I get by with English and people are friendly. While I was walking in local farmer market trying to buy fruits, the people there didn't speak English but we were able to communicate with hand ...


8

I'll confirm what people have already basically said in the comments: English knowledge, especially beyond the very basic level, is surprisingly uncommon. (Furthermore, English with a Russian accent can be very difficult to understand. It's not at all like the Russian accent in the movies : ) The situation is somewhat better with younger people The ...


5

Here are some techniques. Unfortunately the best ones require either knowledge of Russian (or a Russian-speaking friend, hostel employee willing to help, etc), or skillful use of Google Translate: There are many "Groupon-like" sites in Russia, selling gift cards for various activities. They tend to be city-specific, so I can't point you to specific sites. ...


5

This situation is hard to answer, as the trains has much more stable schedule rather than planes, so there are no such situations I can find about Russian railways. This could be two ways - the border officers would have a previous date stamps or not. If the train would be delayed and dates switched, your friend still has a trouble. But, again, this ...


5

It's not clear if they "tend to", but its clear that sometimes they will, as evidenced by your experience. In general, immigration officals tend not to waste time doing more than finding the space they need before stamping/applying stickers etc. Sometimes you can ask for a stamp or visa in a particular place, but a request is all that is.


10

Not that I am recommending it, but it happened to me. I received a Russian visa with wrong date on it. (Note to self: check visa for correctness in future). The boarder guard put a stamp on it like VMAtm described, without further comments. No one noticed on departing the country, either. Now I have a cool visa in my passport with a stamp, and not even the ...


38

Let's think logically. Imagine one is a Russian border officer. One got a job during which each day got the stamp for the passport and visa checks: As you can see, there is a date on it, and it's numbered (the stamp is adjustable itself, however is sealed, so officer can't change the date by himself). So there is no time there (this is important). So ...


64

I wouldn't risk this. I exited Russia with a friend. He had given the end date for his visa, by mistake, as the day we left Moscow. Travelling by train, we didn't reach the border until a couple of days later. They got that he'd made an error, but they were not understanding. He was led away by armed guards. There was no explanation. The entire train was ...


63

I've been on a Russian train with a Canadian whose visa expired during the train ride (so just a couple of hours) as we crossed the border after midnight into Mongolia. Said passenger was marched off the train ("there is ... problem") and returned hours later with multiple fines and a black mark against their name. Short answer: It's not worth the risk. ...


73

There are things I would try doing and there are the others. Attempting to enter Russia before my visa is valid (or attempt to overstay my Russian visa) even if by a few hours only clearly belongs to the others. The visa is valid from a minute before 00:01 of its first validity date and until a minute after 23:59 of its last validity date. Entering the ...


4

As of June 2016, I can confirm that a foreign non-resident can apply and receive a tourist visa to Russia in Tbilisi, Georgia. I've just picked mine up from the consulate. The process wasn't simple, and the application is long, but it is possible. There are some additional requirements for Australian citizens, requiring the application to be completed in ...


8

None, if you're looking only at commercial airlines. This is a map showing non-stop Russian destinations reachable from Fairbanks, Alaska. Here's Juneau, Nome and Anchorage. However ! Air Russia operates for 8 weeks in the summer and for the fifth season this year, you can go from Anchorage to Petropavlovsk. You can also charter a flight with Bering Air, ...


5

Yes, both foreigners and Russian citizens usually need a special permission to enter regions in Russia designated as border zones and Chukotka is one of them. On Google Street View, you can along the Finnish border find some of the signs indicating the start of the regulated border zone. This might sound as an odd, paranoid remnant from the communist era, ...


5

First of all, August and September are "two big differences", as they say in Odessa. September the 1st is the start of school year, so lots of families with children will end their vacations near end of August. The worst you can do is try to leave Crimea in the last week of August. On the other hand, getting there at the same days may be easier than usual. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included