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28

From Wikipedia (same article as your other question): Westray - Papa Westray (Loganair) flight number: LOG 313, 2.7km (1.7 miles) 02 min, aircraft: Britten-Norman Islander, first flight - 3 February 2004 It is obvious from that list that the best option is try searching near the islands. Second place is for the LI 507 (from St. ...


24

The City of Boston's Hackney Carriage Rules [PDF], section 5.II.y: Passenger’s Right to Direct Route: Hackney Carriage Drivers shall take such route to the destination as the passenger shall so direct. So you are absolutely allowed to declare your own route, and the driver must follow it. The Rules explain what recourse you have if they refuse. NYC ...


23

Won't using U1 be faster and easier? Yes - but Google Maps doesn't know about it. Apparently the public transit data in Germany is based exclusively on a cooperation with Deutsche Bahn (which operates the S-Bahn). Other public transit (including regional trains not operated by DB) are not taken into account. They may eventually expand their data base ...


22

I always do it if I think the route is not optimal. You are paying the bill after all!


15

What you're describing is called an "Open Jaw" ticket, and there's a very simple rule for determining if it applies or not. Lets say you're flying A-B and then C-A. There's 3 distances involved here - A-B, B-C (ie, the overland segment) and C-A. For a ticket to be a valid "open jaw", the distance B-C needs to be shorter than both A-B and C-A. eg, SFO-STL ...


15

Cabbies almost always choose the route they think is going to be the quickest, not the shortest. That's because a busy cabbie will lose money whenever they are stuck in traffic - the extra on the meter for stopped time doesn't make up for the fact that they could be getting another fare. So if you try to direct them to a shorter but slower route they will ...


15

I've flown directly over the north pole on a route from ATL to PEK (beijing). Here's a pic of the seatback flight map from a United 747, where I spent the entire flight with my face pressed to the window. Amazing scenery from Hudson Bay north through Baffin Island and on. It was July of 2008. When we crossed the pole (as indicated in the flight map) the ...


14

This past summer I followed quite a bit of it through Central Asia, in areas which I'd consider to be moderately difficult to navigate - like Uzbekistan. Wikitravel shows more information on the Silk Road, and it's worth noting there are several branches of it, depending on whether you go through the deserts, or through Afghanistan. Individual links on ...


13

The longest non-stop (by Wikipedia source) flight is Newark to Singapore on Singapore Airlines flight SQ21 which is and 18 hour 50 minute flight of some 15,345km However for single flight number, allowing stopover, Things are hard to research. Not many websites list tables of distances by flight number. So I resorted to thinking of a route and then looking ...


13

The mythical, even mystical, route I think of, is not by car but by foot. It is not even a single route but a network of paths from everywhere in Europe to a single place: This is the Way of St. James. I never heard of something close to Route 66 in Europe. Though car has an essential role in today's Europe, its history is relatively young. Famous paths are ...


13

In order to fly over the north pole (or more broadly just the Arctic), you'd have to travel to a city that is approximately across the globe as then the shortest distance would go over the north pole. You can try out which cities satisfy this criterion with the distance tool of Google maps. One possible route is for instance from the Middle East to the ...


12

I was in South America (Argentina to Colombia) and in Ecuador & Colombia met a lot of people coming down from (and afterwards friends I'd met travelled up into) Central America. With just one exception (who flew), the others had all gone via the San Blas Islands. http://wikitravel.org/en/San_Blas_Islands Which to me look simply stunning! I'd seen ...


12

Well, you can go old-shool: buy a decent road atlas. Usually there is a table with distances between larger cities (either at the beginning or at the end) - so using it you can have an idea about the scale. Moreover, on every decent road map you will have distances on the actual map - however these are usually between junctions etc., so you will have to sum ...


12

Searching Google for "rude place names" turned up this list, which has lots of entries for Europe. This might be useful in conjunction with a traveling salesman solver, to compute an efficient route between several of the points.


11

I am using Wikipedia for this. Each english wikipedia listing of an airport lists serving airlines and their destinations. So if you want to know where you can go from Hannover airport, just type Hannover (HAJ) airport wikipedia in google and you will be directed towards its listing in wikipedia, with a section on Airlines and destinations. I haven't found ...


11

Western Europe is divided north and south by the Alps. For this reason, there are currently no water routes that go all the way from northern to southern Europe. The closest thing for now to a pan-European waterway is a route along the Rhine to Bavaria, to a point just over 100 miles from the Danube. A canal connecting the two was completed in 1992. This ...


11

From Wikipedia: Newark - Singapore (Singapore Airlines) flight number: SQ 21, 15,345km (9,535 miles, 8,285 nautical miles) from 18 hr 40 min to 18 hr 50 min, aircraft: Airbus A340-500, first flight - 29 June 2004 Second place: Los Angeles - Singapore (Singapore Airlines) flight number: SQ 37, 14,114km (8,770 miles, 7,621 ...


11

What you're most likely hitting up against here is "Interline agreements" (not to be confused with Interline baggage). When you book multiple flights on a single "ticket", even when the flights are on multiple airlines, the ticket is issued by a single airline. eg, if you say SFO-JFK on United, and then JFK-LHR on British Airways, the ticket will be issued ...


10

The route depends on how far you want to run, if you want to get buses, etc. Really, it's just getting the train timetables and matching them all up. Problems The Hainault Loop: The Central Line runs from Ealing Broadway - Hainualt (via Newbury Park) and West Ruislip - Epping (via Woodford) in regular service. The problem is Hainault to Woodford. You may ...


10

Per GCMap, the route flies clearly south of Japan's Okinawa island chain, and thus does not enter the ADIZ. Of course actual flight routings will vary from the ideal great circle route, but usually not by much. (courtesy Great Circle Mapper) Also, Singapore has stated that they will file flight plans with Chinese authorities. Not entirely sure if this ...


9

The same page on Wikitravel as referenced in Zeocrash's answer continues: As of March 2007, travel beyond Kengtung to the rest of Myanmar is not possible, even with a valid tourist visa Kengtung is a town several hours by bus from the Thai border. We stayed there for a few days and then took a domestic flight to Inle Lake. You can also fly to ...


9

When I was in Panama City about 4 or 5 years ago all the hostels had ads posted by private people, sometimes families, that sailed back and forth in their yachts and wanted travellers to come along to help with costs. There was a waiting list for each yacht. At the time the price to sail was pretty much the same as a flight which was in the region of $300 ...


9

Several people already mentioned the sail boat option, but as none of them has done it themselves, I will add my experience from May 2009: As said elsewhere the hostels in Panama city act as intermediaries between travelers and the boats. They have a list of boats leaving on certain dates with prices which ranging from 250 to 350 US dollars. While some of ...


9

What immediately sprang to mind was not as rude as your opening question, but will still upset people in the Bible Belt of the US and probably a few other people too I suppose: Hell, Norway Thanks to Wikipedia & WikiMedia Commons for the photo


9

Thorn Tree - Travel Companions The Thorn Tree travel forum on the Lonely Planet Web site has a branch called 'Travel Companions' where you can post about your plans or current location and people can respond to it. I am reading it via RSS and have sometimes 'talked' to people who have similar plans as I, but I have not met up with anybody yet. You usually ...


9

One of the joys of living in a 3 dimensional world (Eat your heart out The Simpsons!) is that there's more than just the East or West - there's actually numerous routes you can take from the US to Australia - including both North and South! How much these routes actually add obviously depending on where you're starting from - if you're in San Diego it's ...


9

I suppose the only real European equivalent is the ill-defined 'grand tour'. But you'll be hard pressed to actually find it. Here's another question on the grand tour. That said, there are plenty of semi-epic drives around Europe. In fact, much of Europe is so compact, that you can easily come up with your own epic ride in pretty much any part of Europe, ...


9

You may be interested in Via Francigena too. EDIT: I recently stumbled upon the European Institute of Cultural Routes and apparently its main purpose is to preserve, promote and improve historical/cultural routes in Europe. On the Wiki page there's a comprehensive list of the routes they monitor: Major Cultural Routes of the Council of Europe Pilgrim ...


9

Yes, there are many modern roads and highways - especially in Italy - that follow the old roads. They were some seriously industrious workers - with roads throughout Europe, over mountains, across the UK and in the Middle East and Africa! Firstly, voila, Wikipedia to the rescue! Italy Major roads Via Aemilia, from Rimini (Ariminum) to Placentia Via ...



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