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21

From Saint-Peter's Basilica site:


21

Vatican City is certainly open to visit for tourists at large; as you perhaps know, there is no actual boundary between Rome and Vatican City, meaning that nobody checks the papers of those who move from one to the other. However, when I first read your question, I thought that you meant St. Peter's Cathedral, which takes up so much of Vatican City and ...


13

There's no point in bringing US$, Euro is what you need. You can change from CAD before leaving or on arrival. You'll get slightly better rates in the business district (whether in Toronto or Rome) than in the airport. In most countries in the Eurozone, notes up to €20 are in common use. Larger notes may be slightly awkward to spend (you might not be able ...


12

With 109 acres (44 hectares) within its walls, the Vatican is easily traveled by foot; however, most of this area is inaccessible to tourists. No reference about Anglicans, Muslims or any other - just tourists. Any where that a Catholic can get in, you can too, regardless of your background. And also importantly, regardless of your gender - a recent ...


12

I'm Italian and I visited Rome as a tourist myself about one year ago. The image which mouviciel so usefully linked is self-explanatory, but it is not true for Rome or Vatican City only, all the churches in Italy have something similar being displayed IF they are regularly visited by tourists (otherwise, the same rule holds but there is no specific warning,...


11

I was in Venice last year on 27th Nov. Based on my experience on that day : You definitely need to wear jacket. It was around 6-8 Celcius. I put some of my photos below. As you can see, all the people wear jackets. On that day, it was sunny. I love photography as you do, and my photos in Venice were my best photos during my trip in Europe. However ...


11

One option is to take the train. I've just looked for a random weekday in September, and there's basically one train an hour in each direction. It's direct, and takes just shy of 4 hours. To get train times, your best bet is to use Bahn.de and search from there. (Yes, that is the German railways rather than the Italian I'm suggesting, but they have a better ...


11

A Roma Pass may be worth it for the discounts on tourist attractions, however, my wife and I found that most tourist attractions were not easily accessible from the public transit system (e.g., there are only a handful of metro stations that are close to the historic center of Rome, and they are on the periphery). The bus network is extensive, however, it ...


11

In France you can almost always pay with a credit card but for small amounts (say up to €10,) cash is often preferred. In Paris cards are a little more often accepted than in small towns off the tourist track. I have not been in Italy, so not in Rome, but I have heard the same for there. Get some cash and use your card for the bigger payments. If you are ...


11

Rome is always full of tourists. The best time (IMO) to visit is September, just after the most popular summer vacation time for most people Your best bet will also be October and November to mid-December or in January, February when the weather is "less nice" Do not go to Rome if there is a Christian holiday or celebration (Christmas, Easter...) For ...


10

Transportation and getting around wise, your best bet would be to stay somewhere near the Termini train station. That is where the long haul trains arrive, and you are pretty much 10-20 minutes away from pretty much every major attraction. Being close to the Termini station can be helpful if you plan to go/come from Florence, or Civitavecchia, where the ...


9

You can book this train on my website, loco2.com: http://loco2.com/journey/rome-paris-1q0w3dk Unfortunately we can currently only ship this ticket to a UK address. If you cannot book elsewhere, I would recommend trying http://raileurope-world.com as they ship globally.


8

I remember having walked one evening from Vatican to Termini train station and found my way through Piazza di Spagna and Fontana di Trevi. Maybe Piazza Navona as well. You definitivelly should discover Roma by foot. The city is not that big. By the way, one full day in Vatican is what I would have suggested if you hadn't mentioned your schedule. The view ...


8

On Hafas sites (I used the Belgian one), I found 10h41 with one change at Torino: EuroStar Italia - ES 9630: Roma Termini (13h00) to Torino Porta Susa (16h52) TGV - TGV 9248: Torino Porta Susa (17h35) to Paris Austerlitz, (23h51) I got a quote on voyages-sncf.com, the french railways company: 208€ in 2nd class and 262€ in first class. For such a trip, ...


8

The Schengen Agreement is an agreement between several states that created the Schengen Area within which there are little or no border or visa controls. STATI Schengen in Italian means "Schengen countries", so those countries that are part of the Schengen Area. You can find a list of these countries here. I guess your Visa is stating that you can visit ...


7

I've been to Rome several times for long durations and I did not notice any particular day of the week to be more busy than any other. However, weekdays I found were less busy and especially in the early morning you can see tourist sights and not be as overwhelmed with other bodies. Since you will be there in the summer the sun rises early so if you don't ...


7

Your aggressive sightseeing goals are entirely possible. We were in Rome when our cruise ship docked in Civitavecchia, which is about 1 1/2 hours from the city center! We were able to finish all these spots (although the Sistine Chapel was closed), with a few 60+ year olds in tow. That said, it was extremely tiring, and I wouldn't do it again the same way. ...


7

According to historvius.com, among the oldest structures you can visit are the Mamertine Prison, dating back to the 7th century BC, as well as the Temple of Vesta (wikipedia link) on the Forum, which dates from the same period.


7

Long-distance and suburban trains terminate at the Roman Termini train station. From the train station, you need to change to the Metro station. Metro trains run undergound on dedicated tracks. When you disembark the train, follow the white-on-red M signs towards the Metro station. In the Metro station, you'll find ticket vending machines, then fare gates ...


7

Yes MasterCard works in Italy. The question really should be does your bank's credit card work in Italy. Is it a chip & pin card or a chip & sign card (primarily US banks) or a swipe only card? Having a chip equipped card is essential in Europe as most POS (point of sale) terminals are set up for chip cards not swipe cards. Does your bank ...


7

My recent experience as an American tourist in several European countries, including Italy (Rome and Trieste): MasterCard is widely accepted. If your card is a "swipe" card (ie, it is neither chip-and-signature nor chip-and PIN), it will work in slightly fewer places, but will still be adequate for your trip. If your card is a swipe card, read on for some ...


7

Here is a presentation regarding tourism in Italy. It's for 2011 and doesn't show the Colosseum specifically, but does have breakdowns per month for paid and free museum entry. For paid entry, November to February are the months with lowest visitor counts followed increasingly by March, April, May, September and October. August has the highest visitor counts ...


6

Basically, €50 banknotes and smaller (including all the coins) are used in daily life all the time. Some stores may refuse to accept 200€ or 500€ banknotes (€100 is kinda in between). So the best idea is probably to bring your cash in €50 notes. There is no €1 banknote, only coins. Some vending machines only take coins, but nothing important. You probably ...


6

Schengen countries rely on each other to check travellers who cross an “external border”. What this control entails is defined in the relevant EU regulations. If you are only there to visit, you should therefore show that you intend to leave the whole Schengen area, and not merely the country you happen to visit first. Leaving France to Italy would not be ...


6

Traveling to France (mostly Paris) and Italy (Rome, Venice, Sorrento) I mostly pay my day-to-day expenses (local transport, lunch, souvenirs...) with cash. Bigger expenses (mostly restaurants) with my Credit card. I usually keep 60 to 100 euro with me all the time; I keep 20-ish euro in my front pocket and the rest in the wallet in my back pocket (not ...


6

As far as I know, you have two (three) options: The Rome Airport Bus that connects Ciampino to Termini (the main train station) Terravision which is another private airport shuttle that connects the airports passing by the center and Termini The taxi (the most expensive but faster option) Living in Rome, I have never tried one of this options. But I've ...


6

Being the FL1 a regional train operated by Ferrovie dello Stato, I would trust their official FS site more than the ATAC journey planner (or Google for that matter). The FS page on the Airport train services says that the FL1 takes you from Fiumicino to most train stations within Rome. These are (ordered by closest distance from the airport): Roma ...


6

I would like to put forth my experience. We forgot to take our camera when alighting at Florence; the train was bound to Naples. We had very little time left before boarding the next train to Pisa and from Pisa, the flight back to London. We ran to the Trenitalia counter at Florence, and clearly told them the details of the location and attributes of the ...


6

You Will Need an EMV Supported Credit Card EMV stands for Europay Mastercard and Visa. This is the new standard for security related to PCI compliance in Europe. This standard has been adopted in the United States and is currently being rolled out and is behind schedule. Most large banks support this standard in the US, Europe and most of Asia. You can ...



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