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21

From Saint-Peter's Basilica site:


20

Vatican City is certainly open to visit for tourists at large; as you perhaps know, there is no actual boundary between Rome and Vatican City, meaning that nobody checks the papers of those who move from one to the other. However, when I first read your question, I thought that you meant St. Peter's Cathedral, which takes up so much of Vatican City and ...


12

There's no point in bringing US$, Euro is what you need. You can change from CAD before leaving or on arrival. You'll get slightly better rates in the business district (whether in Toronto or Rome) than in the airport. In most countries in the Eurozone, notes up to €20 are in common use. Larger notes may be slightly awkward to spend (you might not be able ...


11

A Roma Pass may be worth it for the discounts on tourist attractions, however, my wife and I found that most tourist attractions were not easily accessible from the public transit system (e.g., there are only a handful of metro stations that are close to the historic center of Rome, and they are on the periphery). The bus network is extensive, however, it ...


11

One option is to take the train. I've just looked for a random weekday in September, and there's basically one train an hour in each direction. It's direct, and takes just shy of 4 hours. To get train times, your best bet is to use Bahn.de and search from there. (Yes, that is the German railways rather than the Italian I'm suggesting, but they have a better ...


11

I was in Venice last year on 27th Nov. Based on my experience on that day : You definitely need to wear jacket. It was around 6-8 Celcius. I put some of my photos below. As you can see, all the people wear jackets. On that day, it was sunny. I love photography as you do, and my photos in Venice were my best photos during my trip in Europe. However ...


10

With 109 acres (44 hectares) within its walls, the Vatican is easily traveled by foot; however, most of this area is inaccessible to tourists. No reference about Anglicans, Muslims or any other - just tourists. Any where that a Catholic can get in, you can too, regardless of your background. And also importantly, regardless of your gender - a recent ...


10

I'm Italian and I visited Rome as a tourist myself about one year ago. The image which mouviciel so usefully linked is self-explanatory, but it is not true for Rome or Vatican City only, all the churches in Italy have something similar being displayed IF they are regularly visited by tourists (otherwise, the same rule holds but there is no specific ...


9

You can book this train on my website, loco2.com: http://loco2.com/journey/rome-paris-1q0w3dk Unfortunately we can currently only ship this ticket to a UK address. If you cannot book elsewhere, I would recommend trying http://raileurope-world.com as they ship globally.


8

On Hafas sites (I used the Belgian one), I found 10h41 with one change at Torino: EuroStar Italia - ES 9630: Roma Termini (13h00) to Torino Porta Susa (16h52) TGV - TGV 9248: Torino Porta Susa (17h35) to Paris Austerlitz, (23h51) I got a quote on voyages-sncf.com, the french railways company: 208€ in 2nd class and 262€ in first class. For such a trip, ...


7

I've been to Rome several times for long durations and I did not notice any particular day of the week to be more busy than any other. However, weekdays I found were less busy and especially in the early morning you can see tourist sights and not be as overwhelmed with other bodies. Since you will be there in the summer the sun rises early so if you don't ...


7

I remember having walked one evening from Vatican to Termini train station and found my way through Piazza di Spagna and Fontana di Trevi. Maybe Piazza Navona as well. You definitivelly should discover Roma by foot. The city is not that big. By the way, one full day in Vatican is what I would have suggested if you hadn't mentioned your schedule. The view ...


7

The Schengen Agreement is an agreement between several states that created the Schengen Area within which there are little or no border or visa controls. STATI Schengen in Italian means "Schengen countries", so those countries that are part of the Schengen Area. You can find a list of these countries here. I guess your Visa is stating that you can visit ...


6

Your aggressive sightseeing goals are entirely possible. We were in Rome when our cruise ship docked in Civitavecchia, which is about 1 1/2 hours from the city center! We were able to finish all these spots (although the Sistine Chapel was closed), with a few 60+ year olds in tow. That said, it was extremely tiring, and I wouldn't do it again the same way. ...


6

According to historvius.com, among the oldest structures you can visit are the Mamertine Prison, dating back to the 7th century BC, as well as the Temple of Vesta (wikipedia link) on the Forum, which dates from the same period.


5

I'd agree that the train is the least expensive option - especially if you take advantage of the Trenitalia MINI discounted tickets - see my blog article on Trenitalia fares for more information. These tickets can be bought 4 months in advance or the day before - if they are still available. You also could fly via Easyjet. If you book in advance you can ...


5

On average, November in Venice is relatively chilly (average daily high is 11°C) and with a good chance of rain as it is the wettest month (weather.com). Still, as with most of Europe, the weather fluctuates and you might experience better (or worse) weather. You will however definitely need to pack for chilly weather.


5

There's an article on the Daily Mail that covered (heh) when this was released. From the article: 'Inappropriately dressed' visitors to the Holy City have been told to cover up by Swiss Guards or face a ban. From this point, shorts skirts and bare shoulders are not allowed. The guards drew aside men in shorts and women with uncovered ...


5

The weekly public transport pass in Rome (in Italian CIS = Carta Integrata Settimanale) is valid within the area called "Roma Capitale". You can buy it for € 24,00 at any automatic vending machine located in every metro station or at almost any newsagent in Rome. With the weekly pass you can ride all the buses, trams, metros and trains within the validity ...


5

Schengen countries rely on each other to check travellers who cross an “external border”. What this control entails is defined in the relevant EU regulations. If you are only there to visit, you should therefore show that you intend to leave the whole Schengen area, and not merely the country you happen to visit first. Leaving France to Italy would not be ...


4

Even if I do agree that during October you won't find super long queues, it's still a good to book some tickets in advance, where "in advance" stands for "one day in advance". The places you mentioned in your post are among the most crowded places in Italy so spending couple of minutes online would save you 30 mins to 1h of queues. I strongly suggest you ...


4

From Wikitravel's great piece on Rome: Rome has excellent shopping opportunites of all kinds - clothing and jewellery (it has been nominated as a top fashion capital) to art and antiques. You also get some big department stores, outlets and shopping centres, notably in the suburbs and outskirts. Main shopping areas include Via del Corso, Via Condotti, and ...


4

You've pretty much sorted things out between Day 1 and Day 2. The only observation I'd make about Day 1 is that the two non Roman sights "book end" the Roman sights south and north. Starting in the south, and moving north, you would see the Spanish steps, Colosseum, Roman Forum, Pantheon, and Trevi Fountain (nearest the Vatican) in that order. If you wanted ...


4

You can use www.tgv-europe.com to book the train tickets. According to the schedule there, the fastest train takes 10:09, with one change in Torino, Italy. However, there are also some direct trains, but all of them are slower. The price depends a little bit on your country of residence, but it seems to be around 200€ for a one-way ticket in the 2nd class.


4

I think there will be almost always available tickets, but the price will be high. If you can buy a lot in advance, you will have the lower prices: Roma - Milano : from 19 €, 3 h, max 4 months in advance, http://trenitalia.com Milano - Paris : from 29 €, 7 h, max 3 months in advance, http://voyages-sncf.com If i look in one month, around 22 feb, it will ...


4

Rome Toolkit .com says no. What Is Not Covered By Rome Travel Passes For buses, you can only use the Rome travel passes on the city buses. You cannot use them on the Rome hop on, hop off sightseeing buses or the airport buses to either of Rome's airports. On the trains the entire Metro system is covered and local services in the city of Rome ...


4

It's not very clear what you mean with "explore the area between" since you will spend all days in cities. Anyway, since I guess it just means how to move from Milano to Roma, you have possibly two ways: Trains: on that route you can take the FRECCIA ROSSA which is a somewhat new train (for Italians standard) with wifi on board, nice seats and so on. It is ...


4

Basically, €50 banknotes and smaller (including all the coins) are used in daily life all the time. Some stores may refuse to accept 200€ or 500€ banknotes (€100 is kinda in between). So the best idea is probably to bring your cash in €50 notes. There is no €1 banknote, only coins. Some vending machines only take coins, but nothing important. You probably ...



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