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12

Cars are by far the most popular way to get around, so renting a car would be the first choice if you look for comfort and flexibility. Just be prepared for very long driving times. Roads are not bad, but they are usually 2 lanes (which means you can get stuck behind trucks or other slow vehicles), and pass through villages (where speed limit is 50km/h). ...


9

Easy. If you're taking a laptop, Skype is the answer. Romania has the second fastest internet speeds in the world (I know, I was shocked when I read it two months ago, which is why it stuck in my head). Hostels have wifi as well, some hotels will too, so that's really probably your best option, if price is your primary factor to consider. Others may ...


9

I was there in 2009. I highly recommend it, and the trains are very easy to use and are quite comfortable. Even when we had an overnight train on chairs, they have a 'backpacker' carriage just for the foreigners, and if there's space they assign you an empty seat next to you at all times, so you can stretch out and try and sleep. I'v also been told ...


8

From http://www.ferrylines.com/en/ferries/ferries-in-the-black-sea/ it would seem to be NO, but it does indicate you could travel to Bulgaria. Aussies don't need a visa for Bulgaria, so you could then take a train up to Bucharest from within Bulgaria. Bucharest to Istanbul is 16 hours, so from Bulgaria wouldn't be a long trip.


8

As usual, the definitive resource for this kind of information is the embassy of the country you want to visit in the country where you are a citizen of, in your case the embassy of Ukraine in Australia. Its visa requirement page, as is common, doesn't have all the information you want. You do need a visa to enter Ukraine, either a tourist visa or a transit ...


7

I think the question is fine, and very valid. As a New Zealander, when I went in 2008 it was required to get an invite from someone in the Ukraine - easy to get, just google for Ukraine invites. Once you have that, you need the visa, where you have to present your invite too, as well as an itinerary (that you're not held to). If you do get in, and can ...


6

A Romanian friend who used to stay in the US told me recently that she purchased a cheap pre-pay card from the carrier Orange that included many minutes of free calls to the US. Perhaps this is something to look into if you don't have reliable internet access (in which case communication is a non-issue). I suggest you find an Orange shop where they speak ...


6

Your first choice is Skype. Skype has a helpful list of minimum and recommended network bandwidth needed for various types of calls. As you can see there, the recommended minimum for voice calls is 100kbps, which you should find easily at most WiFi hotspots. And this is a bit anecdotal, but if you have a smartphone then install Skype on it and use over WiFi: ...


6

We have been in Romania in 2003 and we were using public transport most of the time - very reasonable, I don't remember having any issues with it. Both trains and minibusses were fine. Hitchhiking is quite popular, but beware that you are supposed to pay for it! (similar fee as for the bus). If we couldn't find any form of transport, we actually ended up ...


6

The most comfortable and popular way is by train. There are trains toward most of the cities/villages. The train station in Bucharest is called "Gara de Nord" You can go fast from Bucharest to mountain cities such as Brasov, Sinaia, Predeal (all these in the same zone) or farther to Sibiu. I think you may hire guides for mountain trips. Young Romanians also ...


6

Officially at least, the information you've received seems to be completely wrong. As you're probably already aware, Romania is NOT a Schengen country. They do however have special provisions to allow people with a Schengen Visa to transit through the country for up to 5 days, but only where the intent of the travel is for transit to a third country. In ...


6

Bing Maps shows a route to Sulina by car. However, you shouldn't trust it, because... The Sulina article on English Wikipedia says Sulina is only reachable by boat The Sulina article on Romanian Wikipedia says you can only reach it by way of the Black Sea or the Danube. (That article offers a link to what it claims is the official web site for the city, ...


5

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Bulgaria doesn't mention anything on their website about a relaxed visa regime for holders of Schengen visas or resident permits, so it's safe to assume this doesn't provide any additional benefits. However, a holder of a Schengen visa can stay up to two days in Bulgaria provided that the arrival and departure countries ...


5

I googled your question and found some websites (listed below), that contain general information regarding visa for the ukraine. You might find your answers there. On a dutch website, I also found an advice to ask ukraine travel questions on an expat forum specifically for the Ukraine http://www.travel-2-ukraine.com/visa-support/ ...


5

I found an official site for the Romanian railways, and according to it, there is really a train from Constanta to the Bucharest, which will be at your station at 13:06 local time. There is no other trains to the Bucharest, according to the same site (and here), so I think this train will be :) According this site, the price will be 23.8 RON. All I can ...


5

About the crime, Romania is a civilized EU country and you are safe. The border officers are susceptible to bribes, especially since you have foreign plates. There were recent controls/arrests, one of the measures in order for Romania to qualify for Schengen (which didn't happen yet). There are very few sections of highway (1), so the traffic might be ...


5

Yes you can! This is how to do: You have to have a valid Schengen Visa You are eligible to stay up to 5 days in Romania You have to show the immigration that your next destination is a Schengen Country (ex: Greece, France, etc.) and in this case your trip should be Dubai - Romania - Athens (for transit) - Dubai This type of visa is called a transit Visa ...


5

Answers to both questions are found on the website of the Romanian embassy in the UK under the section "consular services, visas" In short they are: 1 - yes that's correct. 2: You may apply for or collect the Romanian Visa, in person, based on prior appointment, TUESDAY from 14.00 to 15.00 hrs or FRIDAY from 10.00 to 11.00 hrs (excluding public ...


4

About 4 years ago I received a Ukrainian visa from the embassy in the Netherlands (I'm Australian). They even did it super fast as I didn't have much time. There is a train from Romania to Odessa that passes through Moldova. For $20 you can get a transit visa for Moldova (at the embassy in Bucharest) within an hour or so.


4

According to the InterWebs there are only two Korean restaurants in Romania, both in Bucharest (Dami and Korea-house), however where-ever there is a good number of Korean tourists or workers, there is usually also a Korean restaurant. Looking at the web site of Daewoo Mangalia Heavy Industries. all the managers listed there have Romanian names, the ...


4

There's a couple of restaurants that sometimes have live gypsy music. If you got in touch with them you should be able to find out if they have any bands playing while your friends are in town (assuming this isn't too late). Casa Doina sometimes has them playing in their wine cellar. Locanta Jaristea sometimes has Taraful Cailor de Curte Veche playing.


4

Good to hear you like Romania so far, my suggestion is you visit more of the west part, Transilvania (Sibiu, Brasov, Sighisoara or Cluj) than Bucharest. I don't think you should feel obliged to tip at all. Romania in not a third world country although it is the second poorest in the EU. Tipping in hotels, I do not know about, as a Romanian. Do the same you ...


4

I recommend you have a look at rome2rio which find both bus and train connections between those two cities. Trains seem to go every two hours, take 7h of total traveling time and cost €26, changing twice in Püspökladany and Biharkeresztes. Buses are direct either from Budapest Nepliget bus station (easily reachable by metro from anywhere in Budapest) or ...


3

If you have health insurance that's valid in one country in the European Union (plus Iceland, Lichtenstein, Norway and Switzerland), you are usually covered in all of the EU. All you need to do is get a European health insurance card (EHIC); this is free and you can apply online. The EHIC entitles you to medical coverage in the country you travel to, for ...


3

I have been researching Romanian visas about 1.5 years ago, and I also inquired at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs at that time (which, by the way, gave me some unclear and contradicting information...). I took another look at their website now and the following may be relevant for your case: People with a valid Schengen visa can transit through Romania ...


3

No, you can't, not really. There are some threads on 4x4 enthusiasts' discussion forums on how to get closer to Sulina, but even that depends on the water level. What's certain is that there's no official road to Sulina, everybody gets there by boat. There are a few cars in Sulina but just for moving things around, from the docks to the shops or getting ...


3

The taxis in the cities are easy and convenient, though they will probably charge you more if you don't speak Romanian. Make sure they reset their meter when you get in (and that the meter is even on!). Going between cities, I recommend the train. I once took the train from Timisoara to Bucharest (an over-night trip). Three one-way tickets (for three ...


3

Honestly there isn't much to it. I went through the pain of getting an invitation from my aunt in Kiev, and when I applied at the Ukrainian embassy in London the guy there didn't even look at or take the invitation! You pretty much just front up (allow plenty of time), pay, hand over your passport and some photos, wait 14 days...return, collect your ...



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