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50

Provided there were no other sign or rule forbidding it, turning was perfectly fine. The red X cross on blue background means it's forbidden to stop (absolutes Halteverbot). It's somewhat similar to the more well-known “no parking” sign, but stricter (parking is defined as leaving your vehicle or letting it stand longer than three minutes whereas this signs ...


29

Buying option For a one-month trip, I do not recommend buying and selling a car. Although it probably could be done, let me address some of the complications with that first, then I'll discuss rentals: A $3000 car will be old, and probably not very reliable. I would not trust a car in this price range to get me safely around the country without thorough ...


29

I traveled all the way through the USA from the east coast to the west coast, by car and RV. I thought about getting a UMTS / LTE stick for my Notebook, too. But there really wasn't any need for this. You can get FREE WIFI almost everywhere: Coffee Shops (Starbucks, etc.) Fast food Restaurants (Pizza Hut, McDonalds, KFC, etc.) Camp grounds Hotels Shops / ...


23

Red circle means Prohibition, round signal means law-enforced (as per driving code and rules), upper left to lower right red bar means prohibition to park your vehicle (2 or more minutes and stopped engine supposes your car is parked) and upper left to lower right with a 'mirrored' lower left to upper right red bar means prohibition to park or pulling over ...


20

The mythical, even mystical, route I think of, is not by car but by foot. It is not even a single route but a network of paths from everywhere in Europe to a single place: This is the Way of St. James. I never heard of something close to Route 66 in Europe. Though car has an essential role in today's Europe, its history is relatively young. Famous paths are ...


20

You can walk into any large carrier store - AT/T or T-Mobile in your case (since you probably have a GSM phone), and ask for a prepaid SIM card. No address proof, I don't even think they check your ID. T-Mobile usually has the best deals (value for money) and their 3G/4G network is pretty fast. Of course, I am assuming you have an unlocked GSM phone. ...


18

The area you will cover is a bit broad but there are generally rules that you can follow: If you see the No Overnight Parking sign that has an obvious meaning. There are plenty of roadside motels and camping grounds where you can park overnight and sleep. The municipalities may institute their own rules for overnight parking and sleeping in cars so when ...


18

California has some rigorous laws against vagrancy and homelessness and depending upon local ordinances or just plain bad luck you could be in for a nightmare. If you have to do it, try to be outside the city limits. Based upon what you wrote, you will most likely have a license plate that identifies a rent-a-car. That will flag up as unusual for anybody ...


18

I've found (anecdotally) that initially in London, the walking times were way too slow - I was beating the times regularly. Then I moved to Vancouver and found them too fast. I'm a quick walker, so wasn't sure what was happening. I eventually figured it was down to knowledge. I 'knew' London far better, and even though I might be using a map, I could ...


17

The mordida (nibble) is unfortunately deeply ingrained in Mexico, although mostly a feature of local police and not the federal police or the military, and there are various anti-corruption initiatives at work in the larger cities. Generally, the interaction involves being pulled over for a traffic offense like speeding or not wearing a seat belt. The ...


17

The Greenland tourist board says No. There are no ferry connections between Greenland and Iceland, Denmark or Canada. However, more and more cruise shipping companies are choosing to include Greenland on their itineraries, whereby it is possible to begin the voyage from Iceland or go onboard at, for example, Kangerlussuaq. Greenland being an island, I ...


16

The answer is most definitely NO. The fuel prices could be different from station to station some time from block to block and gas stations across the street from each other may have different prices for the same grade of fuel. Reasons for this may vary from local rents and taxes to the ownership of a particular gas station. Case in point close to me ...


15

(The last paragraph is the TL;DR version...) I have bought a car in the US as a tourist four times, but twenty years ago. The first time I was only there four six weeks but I expected to go to all kinds of odd places at odd times so never considered doing it another way given the country's bad reputation for public transport. As pointed out in another ...


15

I have lived in NJ (currently living in NYC) for several years and I can confirm that it's not legal to pump your own gas. Pull your car at the gas station and someone will attend to you.


14

Sounds like you just want a list of more 21+ (not child type of guides) travel guides. I'm 27 and I understand what you're getting into. I've been to Vegas a lot for conventions (photography more specifically). Last time i was there was '09. Vegas grows so fast. There are already new hotels sprouting when I was there, like Aria (newest hotel / condo / loft / ...


14

You may be interested in Via Francigena too. EDIT: I recently stumbled upon the European Institute of Cultural Routes and apparently its main purpose is to preserve, promote and improve historical/cultural routes in Europe. On the Wiki page there's a comprehensive list of the routes they monitor: Major Cultural Routes of the Council of Europe Pilgrim ...


13

The usual way for European students to backpack across Europe is to buy an Interrail pass and travel by train. 30 countries during one month in first class costs less than 1000€. Railways are very efficient in Europe.


13

Unfortunately no, according to Wikitravel. There is no road or rail system. The easiest way to get around Greenland is by plane, particularly Air Greenland. In the summer, Arctic Umiaq Line passenger ships provide service to destinations between Narsarsuaq and Uummannaq along the west coast. Of course, if you got a skidoo or dog sled, you could ...


13

The short answer is yes, larger trucks like moving trucks will be required to go through a weigh station in some states; AAA has a guide to weigh station requirements in Canada and the United States, and you should also ask the agency you are renting from. You will not necessarily have to stop at the weigh station for an inspection, as modern weigh stations ...


13

Good, but not perfect. Any planning tool can only give you estimates based on past experience, but predicting the future is by nature fraught with risk. For reasons explained below in detail, Google Maps is currently less accurate for this route in particular and Japan in general than it would be for, say, the SF Bay Area in the US. As Mark points out, ...


13

As per the official EU Travel Guide: There are no limits on what private persons can buy and take with them when they travel between EU countries, as long as the products purchased are for personal use and not for resale, with exception of new means of transport. You do not have to prove the origin of the goods or show any sort of invoices, unless ...


12

I am bit confused because you say "visiting las vegas" and "we don't want it to be to much of a tourist thing". Las Vegas is a tourist thing. If you want to get drunk then visit the Hooters opposite the MGM. You find a lot of people handling out flyers for strip clubs on the main street (The Strip), and there is a place where you rent a ferrari or lambo ...


12

I did a route like that last year with a friend of mine. We started in Belgium, went first to Ukraine, then down through Romania, Bulgaria, Turkey, Syria and Jordan, where took the boat to Egypt, then went down to Sudan and Ethiopia. We could easily have driven further down, but we ran out of time. (Planning to continue later on in my/our life.) We ...


12

Don't sleep in your car in cities and suburbs in California. Most have local laws covering this, and I wouldn't consider it safe, especially in a new-looking car. Consider getting out of the cities (which can be very unfriendly places) to smaller towns and more countryside. There can often be free camping spots in parks. One resource for free camping is ...


12

No and no. Each location sets its own price for different prices of gasoline (and diesel and kerosene, where they are available). This is true both of independent stations and those branded with a national chain (e.g. Exxon, Shell, Chevron, 7-11, Sunoco, and so on). Most gas stations in the U.S. are independent franchise operations— most people, including ...


11

I'll answer your first two questions: Technically, the road can be done with a normal car, but practically it can't. Too many bad patches, particularly between southern Egypt and northern Kenya or Uganda. That same stretch is also the most insecure. People are kidnapped, robbed and murdered on that stretch, though plenty, particularly locals, do travel the ...


11

IMHO, driving yourself is the way to do it if you want any freedom at all once you get there. I've been to Yosemite several times - the most recent just over a week ago. The drive from the San Francisco Bay Area depends a little on where you start out, and what time of day/week you go, but if you plan for about 4 hours you'll be close to the mark. Once ...


11

I suppose the only real European equivalent is the ill-defined 'grand tour'. But you'll be hard pressed to actually find it. Here's another question on the grand tour. That said, there are plenty of semi-epic drives around Europe. In fact, much of Europe is so compact, that you can easily come up with your own epic ride in pretty much any part of Europe, ...


10

If you have only the toddler (and not, say, a 6 year old and 12 year old as well) I don't think it matters much where you stop. A full on amusement park is wasted on someone who can get hours of joy from a cardboard box or a stick (or, luxury, a cardboard box AND a stick.) You're wise to plan a route that takes you into towns large enough to have parks with ...



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