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26

I traveled all the way through the USA from the east coast to the west coast, by car and RV. I thought about getting a UMTS / LTE stick for my Notebook, too. But there really wasn't any need for this. You can get FREE WIFI almost everywhere: Coffee Shops (Starbucks, etc.) Fast food Restaurants (Pizza Hut, McDonalds, KFC, etc.) Camp grounds Hotels Shops / ...


23

Buying option For a one-month trip, I do not recommend buying and selling a car. Although it probably could be done, let me address some of the complications with that first, then I'll discuss rentals: A $3000 car will be old, and probably not very reliable. I would not trust a car in this price range to get me safely around the country without thorough ...


19

You can walk into any large carrier store - AT/T or T-Mobile in your case (since you probably have a GSM phone), and ask for a prepaid SIM card. No address proof, I don't even think they check your ID. T-Mobile usually has the best deals (value for money) and their 3G/4G network is pretty fast. Of course, I am assuming you have an unlocked GSM phone. ...


16

The answer is most definitely NO. The fuel prices could be different from station to station some time from block to block and gas stations across the street from each other may have different prices for the same grade of fuel. Reasons for this may vary from local rents and taxes to the ownership of a particular gas station. Case in point close to me ...


15

The mordida (nibble) is unfortunately deeply ingrained in Mexico, although mostly a feature of local police and not the federal police or the military, and there are various anti-corruption initiatives at work in the larger cities. Generally, the interaction involves being pulled over for a traffic offense like speeding or not wearing a seat belt. The ...


14

Sounds like you just want a list of more 21+ (not child type of guides) travel guides. I'm 27 and I understand what you're getting into. I've been to Vegas a lot for conventions (photography more specifically). Last time i was there was '09. Vegas grows so fast. There are already new hotels sprouting when I was there, like Aria (newest hotel / condo / loft / ...


14

The area you will cover is a bit broad but there are generally rules that you can follow: If you see the No Overnight Parking sign that has an obvious meaning. There are plenty of roadside motels and camping grounds where you can park overnight and sleep. The municipalities may institute their own rules for overnight parking and sleeping in cars so when ...


14

California has some rigorous laws against vagrancy and homelessness and depending upon local ordinances or just plain bad luck you could be in for a nightmare. If you have to do it, try to be outside the city limits. Based upon what you wrote, you will most likely have a license plate that identifies a rent-a-car. That will flag up as unusual for anybody ...


13

The usual way for European students to backpack across Europe is to buy an Interrail pass and travel by train. 30 countries during one month in first class costs less than 1000€. Railways are very efficient in Europe.


13

(The last paragraph is the TL;DR version...) I have bought a car in the US as a tourist four times, but twenty years ago. The first time I was only there four six weeks but I expected to go to all kinds of odd places at odd times so never considered doing it another way given the country's bad reputation for public transport. As pointed out in another ...


13

The mythical, even mystical, route I think of, is not by car but by foot. It is not even a single route but a network of paths from everywhere in Europe to a single place: This is the Way of St. James. I never heard of something close to Route 66 in Europe. Though car has an essential role in today's Europe, its history is relatively young. Famous paths are ...


13

Unfortunately no, according to Wikitravel. There is no road or rail system. The easiest way to get around Greenland is by plane, particularly Air Greenland. In the summer, Arctic Umiaq Line passenger ships provide service to destinations between Narsarsuaq and Uummannaq along the west coast. Of course, if you got a skidoo or dog sled, you could ...


12

I am bit confused because you say "visiting las vegas" and "we don't want it to be to much of a tourist thing". Las Vegas is a tourist thing. If you want to get drunk then visit the Hooters opposite the MGM. You find a lot of people handling out flyers for strip clubs on the main street (The Strip), and there is a place where you rent a ferrari or lambo ...


12

I did a route like that last year with a friend of mine. We started in Belgium, went first to Ukraine, then down through Romania, Bulgaria, Turkey, Syria and Jordan, where took the boat to Egypt, then went down to Sudan and Ethiopia. We could easily have driven further down, but we ran out of time. (Planning to continue later on in my/our life.) We ...


12

No and no. Each location sets its own price for different prices of gasoline (and diesel and kerosene, where they are available). This is true both of independent stations and those branded with a national chain (e.g. Exxon, Shell, Chevron, 7-11, Sunoco, and so on). Most gas stations in the U.S. are independent franchise operations— most people, including ...


11

IMHO, driving yourself is the way to do it if you want any freedom at all once you get there. I've been to Yosemite several times - the most recent just over a week ago. The drive from the San Francisco Bay Area depends a little on where you start out, and what time of day/week you go, but if you plan for about 4 hours you'll be close to the mark. Once ...


10

If you have only the toddler (and not, say, a 6 year old and 12 year old as well) I don't think it matters much where you stop. A full on amusement park is wasted on someone who can get hours of joy from a cardboard box or a stick (or, luxury, a cardboard box AND a stick.) You're wise to plan a route that takes you into towns large enough to have parks with ...


10

Casual thieves will try to defeat the ignition/steering lock and either ride off with it or ramp it onto the back of a pickup. Professional thieves will bring a couple of bars of rebar and a buddy or three, pick up your ride and haul it into a truck. Prefer covered/underground/garaged parking over uncovered/lot/street parking. If fewer people can see your ...


10

From 1995 to 2010 Italian Radio Television (RAI - Radio Televisione Italiana), conducted a series of road trips with a couple of trucks, usually starting in Italy, with the final destination on various continents including South America, (South) Africa and Asia. So it would be possible to do, but you would need special trucks (not cars), a lot of money, ...


10

Well at 6400km for 28 days, that's around 250km a day (allow extra for finding hotels, seeing sights, etc). That's a LOT of driving. In 2005, I did a trip around South Africa, where we drove 7100km in 23 days. We had some long days (800km) and many shorter days, and it was doable, but wow we did get a bit tired of the car ;) At that rate, the 13 cities ...


10

A nephew of mine witnessed a shooting at a gas station in Northern Mexico when driving from Mexico City to Texas, but then again that can happen anywhere. I saw a shooting last time I was in L.A. When I was in Mexico in 2008/2009 the northern states felt just as safe as the rest of the country. I did not drive but used public transport and walked a lot. I ...


10

All taxes (federal, state, local) are already included. Be careful though, it might get more expensive depending on where you go. One year ago, gas was ~$3,5/gallon around Las Vegas but in Northern California it was more $4. The lowest and highest I've seen were $3,3 and $4,2. So you should still have some margin in your estimate. But like everywhere, ...


10

I think you are misreading the picture. There is a grate running across the road itself that cars can cross without problems but hoofed animals (e.g. sheep) can not. Next to the road there is a gate that can be opened when driving herds. But this gate is never used to close off the road. Generally, in Iceland, a closed gate means no entry. Unless there is ...


9

I suppose the only real European equivalent is the ill-defined 'grand tour'. But you'll be hard pressed to actually find it. Here's another question on the grand tour. That said, there are plenty of semi-epic drives around Europe. In fact, much of Europe is so compact, that you can easily come up with your own epic ride in pretty much any part of Europe, ...


9

You may be interested in Via Francigena too. EDIT: I recently stumbled upon the European Institute of Cultural Routes and apparently its main purpose is to preserve, promote and improve historical/cultural routes in Europe. On the Wiki page there's a comprehensive list of the routes they monitor: Major Cultural Routes of the Council of Europe Pilgrim ...


9

Yes, there are many modern roads and highways - especially in Italy - that follow the old roads. They were some seriously industrious workers - with roads throughout Europe, over mountains, across the UK and in the Middle East and Africa! Firstly, voila, Wikipedia to the rescue! Italy Major roads Via Aemilia, from Rimini (Ariminum) to Placentia Via ...


8

You can certainly go all over Asia. As for Africa, there's nothing in the way except politics, and the ruggedness of your vehicle. For other continents, you'll probably need a specialist vehicle to traverse the ice cap to get across from the top of Russia to the top of Canada. Once you're there, there's nothing physically stopping you driving down to ...


8

If you're driving along northern Ohio and Indiana, you'll be skirting the Great Lakes. Ohio abuts on Lake Erie, western Indiana touches the cleaner Lake Michigan just before you get to Chicago. If you want a "change of pace," it might be worth taking a small detour to see some lake views. There might be some parks along the way. It's been a number of decades ...


8

Careful here. If Google says "8h drive" this means absolutely no red lights, no traffic jam, going max allowed speed all the time and no pit stops. I would double that for a realistic estimate, or plan 3x as much if you want to stop for roadside attractions every now and then. I have been to Toronto during winter. The area on the Canadian side is pretty ...



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