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11

I have not been to Brazil myself yet, but this is on my list, so here is what my research thus far has found. As hippietrail pointed out, the Carnaval in Rio (and in Sao Paulo) has grown to be a huge event that requires a purpose-built stadium in each city. These Carnavals are put on as big mega-parades by Samba Schools and are nowadays meant to be seen ...


8

OK, December 31st is not a public holiday in Brazil but January 1st is. The Wikipedia article on Rio de Janeiro states in the public transport section that buses run 24 hours, but the metro runs a Sunday service on public holidays (new years day happens to be a Sunday next year anyway) Rest of week metro service: 5am - 12am Sunday metro service: 7am - 11pm ...


7

"Do you just buy a ticket to Rio, book any hotel and just enjoy?" That's about exactly what I did for my visit in February 2009. Well I chose my hotel carefully - a decent hotel - search engines are your friend as are reviews. I chose a major airline as well. I booked tickets to the Sambadrome online and for one of the Samba school balls at a ticket seller ...


7

I'm Brazilian and I live in Rio, and I can tell you from first-hand experience. Buses do work on New Year, but if you plan on taking a bus to either go to the most crowded spots, or to leave from them after the fireworks, keep in mind it will be slow. Painfully slow. Anyone going to Copacabana beach after 5~6pm of Dec. 31 will experience traffic jams and ...


7

Source: Rio de Janeiro City Hall web site. Convetional Taxis: Ride starts at R$ 4.80. Price 1 - R$1.95/km (from Monday to Saturday, from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.) Price 2 - R$ 2.34/km (from Monday to Saturday, from 9 p.m. to 6 a.m., and, Sunday and Holidays all day) For each hour stationary - R$ 24.57 (this is a reference value). ...


7

I'll answer my own question after staying in Rio and doing the trekking. This trail is completly safe in all sense. There are police controls in the first part of the trail (the Pista Cláudio Coutinho) and in the upper part (the cable-car station). In reality, all the area is a militar settlement, so I doubt that anybody try to attack you there. In the ...


5

I lived in Copacabana. There are 3 options: Individual-operated cabs - yellow cabs which doesn't have a company name written on its side. Don't take those, they can be dangerous. Company-operated cabs - companies that are allowed to get people from the airport. The company name will be stamped in the car. There will probably be a line of people in the ...


4

Yes, although it will still require a few preparations, as you'll need to join a samba school. Although you won't need to know how to samba! From BookersInternational: What you require All you require is to choose which samba school you’d like to parade with and which wing of the parade you’d like to be in. Each wing has its own costume and you can ...


3

I've never been there myself, but I'll try to answer your question as well as I can. There are several YouTube videos that give insight into the hike. Here's one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=97nw7rblN00 It appears to be very steep in some parts, with ropes built in to facilitate getting up. However, it is of course difficult to come to a conclusion ...


3

The city bus to Corcovado railway station (Cosme Velho street) stops at the lower station of cable car. Link to Google Maps with this bus stop. The cable car is one option. AFAIK, price is R$43 per adult, which is around 21 USD. There is also a road to the top, but city buses don't go there. At the station you can usually also find people that will offer ...


1

I'm quite sure that at arrivals, you can only get prepaid taxis into town. The price is fixed based on your destination. Three weeks ago, the lowest price was about 50R$, the highest, I think, a bit more than double that (presumably for something like Copacobana). That means that if you want a metered taxi, which, depending on the time of day, could be ...


1

Any Rio de Janeiro travel agency (like riocharm.com) can buy you costumes ahead of time, which guarantees your participation. Costumes can range from US$250 to US$2000, depending on the school's ranking, fame and intricacy of the costume. The part-taker should learn a few samba moves, so as not to look like a total gringo, which can harm the samba school's ...



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