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6

Konoko (more commonly kuchiko) and konowata are both examples of chinmi, strong-tasting delicacies intended to be eaten in small quantities as an accompaniment to liquor. There thus aren't any restaurants that specialize in them, they're more the kind of thing you will (or will not) find on a rotating menu of today's specials. But here is one random ...


1

Wong Kei on Wardour Street (in China Town) used to have tables up stairs for bigger groups, and singles and pairs were sent downstairs to sit on these long bench-like tables. This is sort of catering for eating alone, as everyone else downstairs is as well. I haven't been since they refurbished though, so it may have changed (can anyone confirm or deny?) ...


6

I often end up eating alone, and you won't stand out. You particularly won't stand out if you are in a hotel aimed at business men/women, but the food / atmosphere may be boring, and you want to avoid that. I know of no restaurants in London that cater explicitly for single diners (and it would seem a very odd concept). You just get a table for two. Bring a ...


13

Eating Alone Rocks! I will not deny that there might be a social stigma associated with eating alone in some cultures/countries. Comments like "what a loser" immediately come to mind. Truth be told, people will always watch/stare/comment/judge since curiosity is an intrinsic part of human nature. The bottom line is that you should not care. There is ...


5

What you want is a casual dining place. Any formal restaurant tends to have all groups and couples, so you'd stand out. If you like Mideastern food, try Edgware Road. There are many Mid-eastern cafés. One of my favourites is Beirut Cafe. (Nearest Tube: Marble Arch) If you like Vietnamese food, try Kingsland Road. There are half a dozen Vietnamese ...


7

Borough Market, near Southwark Cathedral, very often has a lot of stalls selling good food during the day with a few benches to sit on, but maybe not so much at night. I spend a lot of time in London on my own and there are a lot of "apartment" style hotels, where you get (essentially) a studio flat. There will be a kitchenette, plates and cutlery and it ...


33

London has a constant flow of business travellers who are on their own and likely to be seen dining single. Also, there are several neighbourhoods that cater to the singles crowd. As a consequence, there is no stigma attached to eating alone like there might be in other cosmopolitan cities. But more to the point, London restaurants will happily ...


42

I can reassure you that eating anywhere in London is not perceived as out of the ordinary. Any place you want to have lunch/dinner of just a coffee they will serve you with out any hesitation. London is a very busy city, individuals eating alone is common especially in the city centre where most businesses are placed.


5

I've worked in a bunch of restaurants (many years ago) as both a waitress and a bartender. In both instances I've placed takeout orders for customers either in the restaurant or calling in to pick up. At the time I was making below the standard minimum wage because it's assumed by the government that I'll make it up in tips. That was not always the case. ...


4

In the US, it is generally advised you do not tip for takeout; however, this does not prohibit you from tipping the cashier anyways (which I do). There's no concrete answer for this. Remember, tipping is a way to show that you appreciate the service wrought upon you; people don't tip if the service is bad or horrible, or tip less. For myself, if I have to ...


11

The people at the takeout counter probably aren't dependent largely on tips as their primary wage (as waitstaff in the US are), but if your order is complicated, it is courteous to tip. And, I'd recommend being consistent with a dollar or two if this is a neighborhood restaurant you order from frequently — they'll remember. The blog "Wait But Why" has a ...


12

Generally the worker at the cashier will take tips if given, but they aren't required. Usually the "tip jar" in those circumstances serves as a "put that pocket change you didn't actually want here," like if you're paying cash or the like. Just because there is a jar of some sort next to the cash register doesn't mean they take tips, either; Some ...


16

No, I wouldn't. A tip is for good service (someone bringing food drink to your table, keeping on top of your requests etc.) but with takeout you're buying a product. Its similar to going to McDonalds or Wendy's. Generally, its waiters and waitresses that get tips as they make a lower Federal minimum wage than the other staff. While some states have laws ...


32

No. You don't tip unless it's a delivery charge. For example, if you order takeout food and have them deliver (especially common in hotels), then you'd want to tip the driver. From Wikipedia: Tips are also generally given for services provided in golf courses, casino, hotels, concierge, food delivery, taxis, spa and salons. If you're going to the ...


4

In addition to the kebabs, falafels, pizzas and US-style burger joints European cities have their own variants of cheap, available, mostly eat-on-your-feet food. These are not as healthy as the Asian counterparts, unfortunately. Netherlands: Patat (french fries), kroket (deep fried thing with pulverised meat), and other meaty products like frikandel, and ...



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